Science and Technology

Science
1:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Maybe Dinosaurs Were A Coldblooded, Warmblooded Mix

Being a bit coldblooded has its charms, scientists say. A mammal the size of a T. rex, for example, would have to eat constantly to feed its supercharged metabolism — and would probably starve.
Publiphoto Science Source

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 4:23 am

If you go to a zoo on a cold day and watch the snakes, you'll see what it means to be coldblooded. Not much action going on — most reptiles and other coldblooded creatures take on the temperature of their surroundings, so they tend to be most sluggish when the outside temperature is cool. The monkeys, however, act like they've had one too many cappuccinos.

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All Tech Considered
12:14 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Facebook Ad Targeting Will Use Even More Of Your Data

Facebook says that starting soon, ad targeting will "include information from some of the websites and apps you use," making ads more relevant to users' interests.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 10:53 am

Facebook says it will pull from more user data, including browsing histories, to better target ads to consumers. As the changes roll out over the next few weeks, users will also have more control over their own data profiles, the ones that help determine which ads they see.

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The Salt
11:11 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Has The FDA Brought On A Cheese Apocalypse? Probably Not

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 11:39 am

The Food and Drug Administration official who recently suggested that the wooden boards used to age cheese for centuries may be unsafe probably did not expect to start a cheese storm. But she did.

In a letter to the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, FDA dairy safety chief Monica Metz wrote:

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All Tech Considered
7:09 am
Thu June 12, 2014

How Dame Shirley Jumped Over Tech's Gender Gap In The 1960s

Amid the calls to "lean in" and endless head-scratching over how technology companies can recruit and retain women, the statistics — and their refusal to budge — are sober reminders that tech still has a gender problem. Women head only 3 percent of startups and represent only 20 percent of software developers.

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All Tech Considered
2:20 am
Thu June 12, 2014

How Well Do Tech Companies Protect Your Data From Snooping?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 12:12 pm

What happens to your information online? Is it safe? Is it private?

The answers depend in part on what services you use. So we set out to help you figure out the answers for yourself.

But you may have noticed there is a lot of stuff on the Internet, and I am sorry to say we didn't test it all.

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All Tech Considered
2:15 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Uber's Rapid Growth Pits Innovation Against Existing Laws

Taxi drivers gather in Berlin before joining an anti-Uber protest through the city. It coincided with similar protests in cities across Europe.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 10:53 am

To see the speed of technological innovation, look no further than a street corner. Hailing a cab from the street is less common in cities with Uber, a service that lets you request a ride with the simple tap of a mobile phone app.

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The Salt
2:09 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Fight Over Calif. Oyster Company Splits Chefs And Land Defenders

The Drakes Bay Oyster Farm caters to local residents and restaurants. But unless its lease is renewed, its days are numbered.
Richard Gonzales NPR

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 3:38 pm

Drive just an hour and a half north of San Francisco, and you're in Drakes Estero, named for the first English explorer to lay claim to California.

This near-pristine, wind-whipped marine wilderness is a federally protected home for large beds of eelgrass, the base of the marine food chain. The estuary hosts the largest colony of harbor seals on the West Coast, and tens of thousands of resident and migratory birds.

It's also home to the Drakes Bay Oyster Co.

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Shots - Health News
7:45 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Suicide Rate In U.S. And Europe Climbed During Great Recession

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:12 pm

When trying to tease out the painful effects of the Great Recession, economists often point to the unemployment rate. The global economic crisis, which first took hold in 2007, left thousands jobless and financially insecure.

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The Salt
3:55 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Can You Call Yourself An Environmentalist And Still Eat Meat?

There's little consensus in the debate on how meat consumption fits into environmentalism.
Jit Lim iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 3:28 pm

Earlier this week, we told you about a school backed by director James Cameron and his wife, Suzy Amis Cameron, that may become the first vegan school in the U.S.

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NPR Ed
3:36 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

A High School Band Where Everyone's Voice Can Be Heard

Adam Goldberg, the creator of the PS 177 band, conducting at band practice.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 6:53 pm

(This is Part 2 of a two-part report. Read the full piece here.)

On the surface, the PS 177 Technology Band looks like a typical high school orchestra. But there are two big differences. First, while they use traditional instruments, they also play iPads. And all of the band members have disabilities. Some have autism spectrum disorders.

"I'm Tobi Lakes. I'm 15 years old. I'm in ninth grade. I'm four grades away from college."

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