Science and Technology

Environment
3:59 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

With New EPA Rules, McCarthy Sees Economic Upside In Health Savings

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:50 pm

For more on the new pollution regulations, Robert Siegel speaks with Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy about her agency's carbon emission plan.

Environment
3:59 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

EPA Lays Out Centerpiece To Obama's Climate Change Policy

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:50 pm

The Obama administration is announcing new pollution standards Monday. The rules, key elements of President Obama's climate change policy, may decide the fate of coal-fired power plants in the U.S.

All Tech Considered
2:56 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Apple Makes A Play For 'Smart Homes' By Connecting Appliances

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 7:57 am

Into the quickly crowding field of automated home gadgets and appliances comes Apple, which announced HomeKit at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference keynote on Monday. HomeKit is its entrance into a nascent, fragmented market for home automation, aka the Internet of Things.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

EPA Chief Says Greenhouse Gas Rules Will Save Country Billions

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy signs new regulations targeting greenhouse gas emissions on Monday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:48 pm

New federal regulations that aim to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants will have a large economic upside, largely through health savings, says Gina McCarthy, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency.

"We are talking by 2030 having $90 billion in benefits," McCarthy told NPR's Robert Siegel in an interview airing on All Things Considered.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Jacques Cousteau's Grandson Plans To Spend A Month Underwater

Fabien Cousteau sits inside Aquarius Reef Base in 2012. If he is able to remain under water for 31 days, he will have lasted one day longer than his grandfather, Jacques Cousteau.
Mark Widick AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:43 pm

Fabien Cousteau has been following in his grandfather Jacques Cousteau's flipper-steps for years — scuba diving around the world and making underwater documentaries of his own. Now he's seeking to break the elder oceanographer's record for the longest period of time spent underwater.

Read more
Technology
10:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Google 'Courageous' For Admitting Diversity Problem, So What Now?

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We want to turn to a topic we've discussed quite a bit over the past few months - diversity in the tech industry. Just recently, one of the biggest names in tech, Google, has started talking openly for the first time about diversity.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:02 am
Mon June 2, 2014

EPA Unveils New Proposal Targeting Greenhouse Gases

The EPA is proposing rules that would govern carbon dioxide gas emissions by U.S. power plants. Here, coal is transported via conveyor belt to the coal-fired Jim Bridger Power Plant outside Point of the Rocks, Wyo., in March.
Jim Urquhart Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 10:52 am

New federal regulations announced Monday aim to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030.

The draft proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency has sparked opposition from industry groups who say the changes would be prohibitively expensive. But the proposal's backers say the rules are needed to cut carbon pollution that scientists say contributes to climate change.

Update at 10:45 a.m. ET: Proposed Rule Published

Read more
NPR Story
4:11 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Even If Keystone Pipeline Rejected, Oil May Still Cross Neb. By Rail

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 10:01 am

The proposed Keystone XL pipeline has generated controversy, especially in Nebraska, where opposition to transporting crude from the oil sands of Canada has delayed a national decision on the project.

The Two-Way
12:07 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

A Sisyphean Task Begins As 'Forget' Requests Roll Into Google

Following a European court ruling, Google is taking requests to delete personal information. At one point on Friday, the search engine was getting more than 20 requests a minute.
Jens Meyer AP

Google opened an online form this week allowing European users to request that information about their lives be deleted from the search engine.

In the first 24 hours, more than 12,000 people asked to be "forgotten."

The company was responding to a European Court of Justice ruling in May that said citizens have the right to request certain information be removed, if, for instance, the information is inaccurate or outdated.

Read more
Research News
6:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Creativity, Dirty Eggs And Vocal Fry: The Week In Science

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 1:44 pm

Science is always churning out weird, funny and fascinating findings. What did we miss this week? NPR's Rachel Martin checks in with science writer Rose Eveleth.

Pages