Science and Technology

Media
11:08 am
Mon May 19, 2014

'New York Times' Upheaval: Is This A Barack Vs. Hillary Moment?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a good chunk of the rest of the day's program talking about issues in the media that all happen to bubble up at the same time. Later, we'll talk about why the new fall season just got more colorful. We'll hear about one show that puts an Asian-American family front and center in a network sitcom for the first time in 20 years.

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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Mon May 19, 2014

U.S. Files Criminal Charges Against Chinese Officials Over Cyberspying

Press materials are displayed on a table at the Justice Department in Washington on Monday before Attorney General Eric Holder was to speak at a news conference.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:19 am

(This post was updated at 12:00 p.m. ET.)

The United States has for the first time filed criminal charges against foreign government military officials in connection to cyberspying allegations.

The Justice Department is accusing five Chinese government officials of using military and intelligence facilities to steal trade secrets from U.S. companies, including Alcoa Inc., Westinghouse Electric Co., United States Steel Corp., and Allegheny Technologies Inc.

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Research News
5:36 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Why Reporting On Scientific Research May Warp Findings

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Next we're going to report on scientific research, in particular on the way that reporting on scientific research might actually warp the findings. Scientists face pressure to publish new discoveries, which in turn might influence what they study, and that, of course, is not necessarily a good thing. There's work being published today that's part of an effort to fix this problem. NPR's Shankar Vendantam joined our colleague, Steve Inskeep, to talk about it.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Shankar, welcome back.

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Technology
4:20 am
Mon May 19, 2014

The Making Of 'Cyber Seniors' Spurs Competitive Videos

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's use some of these terms and try to get them right. A couple years ago, a team filming a documentary called "Cyber-Seniors" followed a program in Toronto where teenagers teach older people how to use computers.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: So, here, I'll get you to hold the mouse, put your hand like this...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: I know how to turn it on. That's all.

GREENE: Now, during the course of the filming, director Saffron Cassaday says the story took an unexpected twist.

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All Tech Considered
4:49 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A New Kind Of Sports Star: Gamers Make It To The Next Level

The studio audience watches a match between professional teams Dignitas (left) and Evil Geniuses (right) during the League of Legends North American Championship Series on Feb. 22.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:11 am

The world of competitive online gaming hit a milestone last week when the prize pool for The International — a tournament for the game Dota 2 — reached more than $5 million, the largest in the history of e-sports.

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Humans
4:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

The First American Teenager, Millennia-Old And Underwater

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 5:28 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

From the studios of NPR West in Culver City, California it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'M Tess Vigeland. Let us contemplate the American teenage girl, perhaps the very first one. Apparently, there's been some scientific debate about who she is and whether she hails from the same gene sequence as what we think of as the first Americans, American Indians. And when I say gene sequence, we're not talking about Skinnies from Urban Outfitters. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palca has the story of a very old American teenage identity crisis.

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Environment
4:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Fighting Bugs With Bugs: Hatching A Solution For Troubled Trees

The invasive Asian citrus psyllid can carry citrus greening disease, which kills trees within a few years of infection.
Mike Lewis Center for Invasive Species Research, UC Riverside

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:11 pm

We all know about the drought in California, but farmers there have more to worry about than a lack of water.

There's also the looming threat of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), an invasive pest that flies from tree to tree, feeding on tender leaves. By itself, the psyllid is not particularly harmful, but it can carry citrus greening disease, which kills trees within a few years of infection. There is no cure.

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The Two-Way
2:12 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A Giant Among Dinosaurs, Discovered In Argentina

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:28 am

Paleontologists in Argentina say they have unearthed the fossils of the biggest dinosaur ever to walk the planet.

The bones are believed to be from a new species of the aptly named titanosaur, a massive herbivore from the late Cretaceous period, officials from the Museo Paleontologico Egidio Feruglio told BBC News.

The titanosaur was a sauropod, like the apatosaurus or brachiosaurus, that roamed the forests of Patagonia 95 million years ago.

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Health
6:41 am
Sun May 18, 2014

MERS Appears To Spread With Business-Meeting Contact

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 4:09 pm

NPR's Lynn Neary talks to science correspondent Rob Stein about the first human-to-human infection of MERS in the U.S.

Krulwich Wonders...
4:27 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Intriguing Lime-Green Blobs Appear In The Andes Mountains. Are They Alive?

Courtesy of Terrace Lodge

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 9:09 am

Oops.

Someone dropped lime sherbet on the desert — and it's melting. Who's going to clean this up?

Nobody. Because this — believe it or not — is a plant. It may look like a glob of goo, but it's not at all gooey. It's solid to the touch — so solid that a man can lie on top of it and not sink in, not even a little.

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