World

NPR Story
4:27 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Ukraine Opposition Tries To Force Yanukovych From Office

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 7:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Protesters in Ukraine have given their country's president an ultimatum. They say he must call early elections or unrest will grow even worse. This country of 45 million people is fighting over which way it leans - toward European nations to the West or eastward toward Russia, which once controlled Ukraine. Protests began when the president gave in to Russian pressure to block a trade deal with the European Union. And those protests have turned deadly this week with at least two people killed - more by some estimates.

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NPR Story
4:27 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Danish TV Drama Sparks Discussions On Wills

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 7:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Wow. For all we know this could be the next European TV program to become a hit in the United States. You've heard of "Downton Abbey," this program goes a little more continental. The program by the Danish Broadcasting Corporation is spreading to other countries, sparking a discussion of the edgy subject of inheritance.

Sidsel Overgaard reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SERIES, THE LEGACY)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Foreign language spoken)

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The Two-Way
6:14 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Online Donors Send Jamaican Bobsled Team To Sochi

The two-man Jamaican bobsled team will be heading to Sochi, Russia, for the 2014 Winter Olympics, after a fundraising campaign gave a much-needed boost to its budget.
Jamaican Bobsled Team

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 12:31 pm

After word went out that Jamaica's two-man bobsled team had qualified to compete in Sochi next month — but didn't have money to go to Russia — Internet donors saved the day. Thousands of people contributed to online campaigns, including one held in Dogecoin, the peculiar digital currency.

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Latin America
3:39 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Ahead Of World Cup, Brazil's Delays Have FIFA Concerned

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 7:01 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Just six months to go until Brazil hosts soccer's biggest tournament, the World Cup, and for Brazil, it is crunch time. Just yesterday, soccer's governing body, FIFA, issued a stark warning. One of the host cities is now in jeopardy of being dropped because its stadium is hugely delayed. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Sao Paulo on Brazil's mad scramble to get everything done on time.

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Middle East
3:39 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Turkish Opposition Eyes Its Opportunity In March

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 9:38 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Over the next 17 months, Turkey will see three elections: local and presidential elections this year, followed by parliamentary voting next year. With Turkey's political landscape unsettled by scandals and growing voter discontent, even the local elections are drawing intense interest and that is especially true in Istanbul. As NPR's Peter Kenyon reports, the secular opposition sees the mayor's race there as its best chance in a decade of scoring a win over the dominant ruling party.

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Afghanistan
3:39 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Pentagon, White House Are At Odds Over Afghanistan

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 7:01 pm

The Pentagon is saying that it needs to keep 10,000 troops in Afghanistan after 2014 to train Afghans and maintain a counterterror mission. But military officials are once again running into interference from Vice President Joe Biden. That's nothing new: Biden in particular has for years pushed for a counterterror option of only several thousand troops, though the military says that number is far too small. The Pentagon argues that Biden's proposal would mean the U.S. forces would be largely consigned to their bases.

Latin America
3:39 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Vigilantes Strike Back Against Mexican Cartels

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 7:01 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In Mexico, thousands of federal troops remain in dozens of towns in the western state of Michoacan. That's where civilian vigilante groups have emerged in recent months to fight off the Knights Templar cartel. Authorities say they've arrested 38 cartel members, but won't move to disarm the so-called self-defense groups. Heroes to some, gang members to others, these vigilantes are now on the offensive, even taking to social media to spread their message. NPR's Carrie Kahn has the story.

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Middle East
3:39 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

In Syrian Conference, Former Diplomat Hears Echoes Of The Balkans

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 7:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For some people, the juxtaposition of a sectarian civil war unimpeded by intense diplomatic effort has a familiar ring and that ring recalls the war in Bosnia in the early 1990s. Yugoslavia had come undone. The patchwork of Serb, Croat and Muslim populations descended into a bloodletting.

Lord David Owen, the former British foreign secretary, was the European Union's negotiator for the Balkans and he joins us now from London. Welcome to the program once again.

LORD DAVID OWEN: Nice to be here.

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Middle East
3:39 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Syrian Peace Talks Open With Bitterness And A Bit Of Hope

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 7:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The Syrian peace conference got off to a bitter start today with sharply opposing visions over a future role for Syria's President Bashar al-Assad. More than 40 countries sent delegations and many of their speeches struck similar themes decrying the vast human suffering in Syria and calling for a political solution to the crisis.

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World Views
2:26 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Oklahoma City Non-Profit Brings Local Language Instruction To West Africa

Students of the La'Angum Learning Center in the remote East Mamprusi district of Ghana.
Credit Alice Iddi-Gubbels / PAMBE Ghana

Alice Iddi-Gubbels grew up in northeastern Ghana - the oldest of 17 children and one of the first from her rural village of Bongbini to attend school.

English is the country’s official language, but most of Ghana’s rural population only speaks one of the dozens of local languages. But Iddi-Gubbels started school in an era when educators thrust unfamiliar English-only instruction upon students.

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