World

Middle East
4:22 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Pakistan's Former President Charged In Benazir Bhutto Murder

Pakistan's former military ruler Pervez Musharraf has been charged with murder in the assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. Musharraf is back in Pakistan after a self-imposed exile. He denies the charges. Shuja Nawaz, director of the South Asia Center at The Atlantic Council, speaks with Melissa Block about the implications of the case.

The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

In First Meeting Since 1970s, Afghanistan Tops Pakistan In Soccer

Afghanistan's soccer players dance to celebrate beating Pakistan, in a friendly match played Tuesday in Kabul.
Rahmat Gul AP

Soccer fans are strutting in Afghanistan today, after their national team defeated neighboring Pakistan, 3-0, in a friendly match sponsored by FIFA, soccer's governing body. Before Tuesday's match in Kabul, the two teams had not played each other in more than 30 years.

Afghan media relished the win, with the Pajhwok news agency declaring, "Afghanistan lash Pakistan in historic soccer duel."

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Australian's Shooting Death Echoes From Oklahoma To Melbourne

A tribute page to Christopher Lane, an Australian college baseball player who was shot and killed in Oklahoma last week, has drawn thousands of responses on Facebook.
Facebook

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 5:20 pm

The killing of an Australian man who was in the U.S. on a baseball scholarship has brought grief to his hometown and to the small Oklahoma town where he was shot to death. Three teens have been arrested for the crime; one suspect says they simply had nothing better to do, the police report.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Tue August 20, 2013

New Leak Reported At Japan's Fukushima Nuclear Plant

A construction worker walks beside underground water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan.
Toshifumi Kitamura AP

Operators are reporting a fresh leak of contaminated water from the grounds of the ruined Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Japan's coast.

In 2011, a tsunami sparked meltdowns at the plant, and authorities have had to pump in water ever since to keep the melted nuclear fuel cool. After passing through the reactors, the contaminated water is decontaminated and put into storage until it can be recirculated through the reactor cores.

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World
11:06 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Unrest Boiling Over In Egypt

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Cuban jazz legend Arturo Sandoval joins us for a wisdom watch conversation. He'll tell us about his life in music and his special friendship with Dizzy Gillespie.

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The Salt
10:59 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

A child eats instant noodles on a train at the Harbin Railway Station in northeast China.
Wang Jianwei Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 2:25 pm

Ask about the foods that have conquered the world and you're likely to hear about Coca-Cola and McDonald's Big Macs.

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Parallels
10:52 am
Tue August 20, 2013

60-Second Video: Syrian Refugees Escape To Lebanon

Global Post

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 1:47 pm

Nearly 2 million Syrians are refugees in other countries because of the civil war in their country. Many of them — nearly 700,000, according to the U.N. — are now in Lebanese camps.

Our partners at Global Post have captured how some Syrians enter Turkey and then make their way by boat to Lebanon.

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Parallels
10:49 am
Tue August 20, 2013

CIA's Acknowledgment Of Iran Coup Role Is Latest Revelation

Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh in October 1951. The CIA this week acknowledged publicly for the first time that it played a role in the coup that ousted Mossadegh.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:45 am

The CIA isn't exactly known for its openness. But for a spy agency, it's been a gusher of information over the past week when it comes to old controversies.

The CIA has now acknowledged its role in the 1953 coup that deposed Iran's left-leaning Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh. Few Iranians will be surprised. They have always believed Mosaddegh was ousted by U.S. and British interests, and those suspicions are a big part of Iran's mistrust of the West to this day.

The Iran revelation was not the only one.

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Tue August 20, 2013

UPDATE: No Decision Yet On Egyptian Aid, White House Says

Egyptian soldiers stand guard in front of the constitutional court in Cairo.
Al Youm Elsabaa newspaper EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 1:02 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

(We put a new top on this post at 11:50 a.m. ET and added a new development being reported by the AP at 2 p.m. ET.)

The Obama administration is still reviewing U.S. assistance to Egypt and it's incorrect to say that such aid has been "secretly" put on hold, the White House said Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
8:13 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Murder Charges Against Pakistan's Musharraf Are Unprecedented

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf in April, near his home in Islamabad.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 7:59 am

The indictment Tuesday of former Pakistani President and army chief Pervez Musharraf on murder charges connected to the 2007 assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto is an unprecedented exercise of power by a civilian court in a country long dominated by the nation's military, NPR's Abdul Sattar reports from Islamabad.

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