World

The Two-Way
8:55 am
Thu April 30, 2015

'Charlie Hebdo' Cartoonist Says He Will No Longer Draw Prophet Muhammad

French caricaturist Luz, seen on Jan. 15, says drawing Islam's Prophet Muhammad no longer interests him.
Ian Langsdon EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 3:51 pm

The French cartoonist who drew the Charlie Hebdo cover featuring Islam's Prophet Muhammad after the deadly attack on the magazine in January by Islamist militants says he will no longer draw the figure.

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Parallels
7:26 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Bullfighting For Buddhists: A Less Bloody Alternative In South Korea

The General (right) and his opponent, Dragon, lock horns during this year's Cheongdo Bullfighting Festival in South Korea. There are no matadors and no swords in the South Korean version. The bulls fight until one turns and runs.
Marius Stankiewicz for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 10:19 am

Sitting in a stadium that seats 10,000, I look down at the ring and something I never thought I'd see in Asia: a bullfight.

But instead of pitting matador versus beast, two bulls face off in the South Korean version. And befitting a Buddhist country, the battle ends not in death, but in surrender. In some cases, one of the combatants simply turns and wanders off.

"In Korean bullfighting there is no mortal end in sight for these beasts of burden," my interpreter says.

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The Two-Way
7:05 am
Thu April 30, 2015

10 Men Sent To Prison Over Shooting Of Pakistani Girl Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai, who was 15 when she was shot, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize last year.
Hakon Mosvold Larsen EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 7:25 pm

A Pakistani anti-terrorism court has sent 10 men to prison for 25-year terms for their roles in the near-fatal attack on activist Malala Yousafzai in 2012. The girl who has since come to be known only by her first name later won global renown for her work promoting education for girls.

From Islamabad, NPR's Philip Reeves reports:

"The 10 were convicted by an anti-terrorism court in a closed hearing in Swat in north-west Pakistan. That's where Malala Yousafzai, then aged 15, was shot and seriously wounded as she returned from school.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Rescue Brings A Bit Of Good News To Nepal's Capital After Earthquake

Members of Nepal's Armed Police Force carry an officer as they cheer the successful rescue of a teenager who had been trapped by Saturday's earthquake in Kathmandu.
Navesh Chitrakar Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 9:52 am

There hasn't been much to cheer about in Nepal this week as it copes with a devastating earthquake — but cheers and applause broke out in Kathmandu Thursday after a teenager was pulled alive from a collapsed building.

For five days, the teenager was covered in the rubble of a seven-story building hit by Saturday's powerful quake. Rescue workers who got him out included an American disaster response team that arrived in Nepal this week.

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Middle East
5:24 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Israel Criticized For Leaving Pregnant Surrogates In Nepal

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 10:07 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Parallels
4:16 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Saudi King Salman Reshuffles Line Of Succession

Earlier this month, Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's new deputy crown prince, met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi in Cairo.
Egyptian Presidency Handout EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 3:42 pm

Things are changing in Saudi Arabia. The new king made a surprising move this week, choosing his nephew to take over as crown prince and his son to take the position of deputy crown prince.

The decision marks a generational shift. For the first time, a grandson of the founder of the kingdom is heir to the throne. And one young prince, the son of King Salman, is emerging as a war hero for many Saudis as the country continues to carry out airstrikes in Yemen.

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NPR Story
4:16 am
Thu April 30, 2015

With Only One Runway, Kathmandu's Airport Hinders Earthquake Relief

Monks and aid workers walk to the arrival terminal at Kathmandu's international airport. The plane was unable to secure an arrival gate when it landed on Wednesday.
Taylor Weidman LightRocket/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 1:04 pm

There's a lot of aid headed toward Nepal, but it's not getting there as fast as people would like.

The reason: There aren't enough runways.

The country's only international airport is Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu. It's tiny. It has just one runway. So it can't accommodate all the planes flying in.

The single runway has been closed several times for earthquake repairs. Also, there are limited places for planes to park. On many days, pilots circled for hours waiting for another plane to take off because there's no room to land.

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Parallels
2:25 am
Thu April 30, 2015

The Frightened Vietnamese Kid Who Became A U.S. Army General

Brig. Gen. Viet Luong of the 1st Cavalry Division came to the United States in the 1970s after his family fled Vietnam in the waning days of the war there. He's now leading the effort to train Afghan soldiers to fight the Taliban.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 10:07 am

Brig. Gen. Viet Luong sits on a case of MREs, the soldiers' daily meals. He's inside a cavernous hanger at an Afghan army base outside the southern city of Kandahar.

A couple dozen American and Australian soldiers lounge on green cots lining the sides. Banners of U.S. military units hang on the walls. Between the troops is a 6-foot-tall shipment of Girl Scout cookies.

Luong's job is to train the Afghan military to fight a guerrilla force, the Taliban. But he's willing to talk about another guerrilla war, long ago.

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Parallels
2:23 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Learning About The Quran ... From A Catholic Archbishop

Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald is one of the Catholic Church's top experts on Islam. He has served the Vatican in places such as Tunisia, Uganda and Egypt, and now is promoting interfaith understanding by teaching Jesuit students in Cleveland about the Quran.
Rob Wetzler

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 2:11 pm

As a 12-year-old Catholic boy growing up in England, Michael Fitzgerald decided he wanted to be a missionary in Africa. Eight years later, he was studying theology and learning Arabic in Tunisia.

He went on to devote his priestly ministry to the promotion of interfaith understanding between Muslims and Christians, and became one of the top Roman Catholic experts on Islam. He has served as the archbishop of Tunisia, the papal nuncio — effectively a Vatican ambassador — in Cairo, and the Vatican's delegate to the Arab League.

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Goats and Soda
5:44 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Israeli Dads Welcome Surrogate-Born Baby In Nepal On Earthquake Day

Now this is an international baby: Born to a surrogate mom in Nepal (who was implanted with an egg from a South African donor) and now living in Israel with his parents, Amir Vogel Greengold (left) and Gilad Greengold.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 11:19 pm

The sperm came from Israel. It was frozen and flown to Thailand, where a South African egg donor awaited. After the egg was fertilized, the embryo traveled to Nepal and was implanted in the Indian woman who agreed to serve as the surrogate mother.

And roughly nine months later, there was a big, bouncing earthquake.

The world of international surrogacy is ... pretty complicated.

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