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Oklahoma Teachers Move Science Lessons Outside And Away From Textbooks

10 hours ago
Zoe Travers / StateImpact Oklahoma

The state’s market for engineering and technology jobs is growing, but the test scores of Oklahoma students lag behind national averages on science and math test scores. Researchers say one way to fix this gap is training science educators to do more than teach the facts — and to think beyond the textbook.

Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

One of the most iconic images of the teacher walkout and the cuts to education funding that drove the movement was of tattered, duct-taped, antiquated textbooks.

Traci Baker

Oklahoma’s Libertarian Party recently elected a 20-year-old Traci Baker to be the party’s state secretary. Baker, who studies at University of Oklahoma, is the first transgender political party executive in the nation, and her decision to register as Libertarian coincided with coming out as transgender.

“I was about to come out as trans, and I thought now’s a good time to re-register as a libertarian and associate with a party that I might be able to find some level of success with,” Baker said.

Across the country, universities are being criticized over issues of money: from how they spend their endowments, to how they raise tuition, to how they award financial aid.
Michael Schiller / Reveal

It’s no secret that college is getting more expensive – or that America’s student debt has erupted into a full-on crisis. But it’s not just loans that are putting pressure on Americans seeking an education. As this week’s episode explains, students face a variety of obstacles, from rising tuition rates to hard-line immigration laws.

Reveal: Trumping Hate

11 hours ago
Mr. Fish for Reveal

There’s been a lot of conversation about whether Donald Trump has inspired a new wave of hate in America.

Reveal reporter Will Carless set out to understand the president’s role in hundreds of hate incidents across the country, with help from the Documenting Hate project led by ProPublica. He found a striking pattern that extended across races, religions and sexual orientation.

We also check in with Reveal reporter Aaron Sankin about what’s going on inside the government agency that’s supposed to be fighting discrimination, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Legislature gave final approval on four criminal justice reform bills and sent them to the governor Tuesday. Here’s a breakdown of the measures and what they’re designed to do:

Robert MacDonald via AP

State climatologist Gary McManus says this year will be the latest start to the state’s tornado season on record.

“We’re going to be into May, at least, before we get our first tornado,” McManus said. He noted, since the National Weather Service began keeping records in 1950, the latest recorded start to Oklahoma’s tornado season was April 26, 1962.

By this time of year, Oklahoma has usually recorded 16-17 tornadoes. Drought and cool weather are two factors contributing to the late start in 2018.

Workers at a site of a pipeline under construction along state Highway 75 north of Horntown.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Today on the Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record senior reporter Sarah Terry-Cobo talks discusses conservation credit programs that are designed to protect the American burying beetle. She also talks about the Choctaw Nation’s recycling efforts.

John Minchillo / AP Images

For the first time since they officially declared for the race, six of the 10 candidates vying for the GOP’s gubernatorial nomination came together Monday for a forum hosted by The Oklahoman.

The six tackled issues ranging from abortion rights to wind taxes as they tried to convince prospective voters watching in person at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art or at home watching the live feed why they should receive their support.

Here are some of the takeaways from the debate:

Tax Increases

silhouette of Donald Trump with speech balloons
Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump is hosting French President Emmanuel Macron for a state visit this week. The two leaders are holding a news conference ahead of Tuesday night's state dinner. Watch their remarks, scheduled to begin at 11:45 a.m. ET.

Nichols Hills City Hall under construction in 1970.
D. Heaton / Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection, Oklahoam Historical Society

The City of Nichols Hills takes up approximately two square miles within the Oklahoma City city limits. It's home to about 3,700 people.

 

KGOU listener Marcella Meade asked “How Curious:” where did the name Nichols Hills come from?

Thomas & Dianne Jones/Flickr

Representative Kevin Wallace suggested as little as 1 percent of the state budget remains to be negotiated as lawmakers eye the end of the 2018 legislative session on May 25. That’s according to eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley.

 

 

Ashley says state agencies will most likely see flat budgets. State revenue has increased due to economic growth and revenue generating measures from previous sessions, giving lawmakers more money to appropriate. And lawmakers have already dealt with many of the biggest budget items, like public education.

AP Photos/Hasan Jamali

Despite the rapid pace of medical advancements like gene therapy, treating many of the world’s most devastating diseases is a matter of economics and political will, not science. That’s according to Dr. Peter Hotez, the dean of Baylor University’s National School of Tropical Medicine.

 

 

 

State Sen. Ervin Yen supports nitrogen hypoxia as an execution method.
Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma wants to go where no state has gone before: Executing death row inmates with nitrogen gas. Officials say nitrogen will bring quick, painless deaths, but the research is slim — and it has never been used in U.S. executions.

In this May 5, 1995 file photo, a large group of search and rescue crew attends a memorial service in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.
Bill Waugh / AP Photo

Richard Williams just walked out of a meeting in the Murrah Federal Building on the morning of April 19, 1995. He was talking with a colleague when the blast went off. It’s the last thing he remembers.

“I was dug out by an Oklahoma City policeman, taken to the university hospital where they treated me with triage and subsequently follow-up surgeries and physical therapy and all those kind of things for years,” Williams said.

KGOU/Caroline Halter

Elected officials and citizens gathered to commemorate the 23rd anniversary of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

April 19 marks the anniversary of the deadly bombing of the Murrah Federal Buildings that killed 168 people and injured hundreds more.

Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Days after telling her boss she was pregnant, a 17-year-old fast-food worker in Oklahoma was fired.

An accounting employee was let go from an Oklahoma City pipeline inspection company, two days after requesting information about maternity leave.

A pregnant waitress in her first trimester said the owner of a Choctaw restaurant told her she was being fired because she was too emotional.

Oklahoma State Department of Education

The education advocacy that fueled the teacher walkout also led to a surge of candidates filing for office, including a few surprises in the race for state superintendent.

Joy Hofmeister, state superintendent of instruction, drew four opponents.

Hofmeister, 53, will face two Republican challengers in the June primary: Linda Murphy, of Edmond, and Will Farrell, of Tulsa. Murphy, 66, is a public policy consultant who twice ran against Sandy Garrett for state superintendent. Farrell, 32, is a student at Oklahoma State University and a legal assistant at a Tulsa law firm.

Trevor Brown / Oklahoma Watch

The state will have to find another way to help fund graduate medical education by July 2019 if it wants to use Medicaid matching funds after the federal government denied the Oklahoma Health Care Authority’s latest bid to fix the program’s funding issues.

John Minchillo / AP Images

Oklahomans may no longer need to worry they might be breaking the law by posting a selfie with their ballot on Instagram on Election Day.

 

The state Senate has passed House Bill 3053, allowing voters to photograph both in-person and absentee ballots and post them on social media, as long as they don’t break any other laws by doing so. The House of Representatives passed the bill in February. It now heads to Gov. Mary Fallin for her signature.

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