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Art Rutledge looks over a shipment of liquor at Vice Spirits, Wine, Beer at 317 N. Walker Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma is finalizing legal action it promised to take after the passage of State Question 792 in November.

The ballot initiative would change the state's laws to allow wine and cold beer to be sold in grocery and convenience stores, starting in 2018. The Retail Liquor Association’s attorney Ann Gervais Richard told The Journal Record's Molly Fleming the lawsuit could come in the next few weeks:

Monthly wastewater injection into disposal wells in the Arbuckle formation from 2000 to July 2016. A team of Stanford scientists found earthquake rate changes follow changes of the injection rate with a time delay of several months.
Science Advances

Scientists may have a promising seismic forecast for Oklahoma over the next few years: A lot less shaky with a smaller chance for damaging earthquakes.

Newly published research bolsters a growing body of scientific findings linking the state’s earthquake boom and the underground injection of large amounts of wastewater from oil and gas production, but suggests the shaking could taper off after 2016.

Oklahoma City skyline
Greater Oklahoma City Chamber and Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

The Oklahoma City Council will consider mid-year budget cuts of more than $9 million dollars at its regular meeting Tuesday. If approved, it would be the city’s second cut this year.

This round of proposed cuts would  offset shortfalls in sales tax and use tax collections. At stake are 39 positions. That includes 11 vacant police officer positions, and moving four resource officers out of schools.

In this Thursday Jan. 7, 2016 photo, an elderly woman drinks water from a bucket after waiting for hours for the municipality to deliver free water, in Senekal, South Africa.
Denis Farrell / AP

As resource distribution issues grow increasingly global, so do the organizations dedicated to solving them. From the Wounded Warrior Project to Water for People, Ned Breslin has used his experience to transform how nongovernmental organizations approach issues of water and sanitation in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Two high-level officials in Oklahoma are under consideration for President-elect Donald Trump’s administration, but state law is particular about who can fill their seats if one or both move to Washington.

Gov. Mary Fallin and Attorney General Scott Pruitt have both met with Trump as he forms his Cabinet. Fallin is rumored to be a candidate for Secretary of the Interior, and Pruitt’s name has been floated for a role within the Environmental Protection Agency.

Computer screen with heathcare.gov open.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Seven weeks from now Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States. One of his signature campaign promises involved repealing or changing the hallmark legislative achievement of his predecessor – the Affordable Care Act.

Overhauling or undoing such a complex healthcare law nationwide won’t be a simple task, according to The Journal Record’s editor-in-chief Ted Streuli.

Donald Trump campaigning at an immigration policy speech at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From board rooms to drilling rigs, much of the U.S. fossil fuel industry has been counting down the days until President Barack Obama turns over the keys of the White House. Donald Trump doesn’t officially take the wheel of the nation’s energy policy for a couple of months, but Oklahoma’s oil and gas industry says its prospects have already improved under the president-elect.

Sara Hill, Cherokee Nation secretary of the environment and natural resources, stands outside the Cherokee Nation Courthouse in Tahlequah.
Kirby Lee Davis / The Journal Record

The Cherokee Nation has sued the federal government, and wants to know details about how it has managed its property throughout history.

Washington has historically overseen certain assets of recognized tribes, like property or money earned off leasing or selling that land.

Dan Boren in his office in Oklahoma City, January 8, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

A pair of high-profile Oklahoma Democrats say they won't seek their party's nomination to replace term-limited Gov. Mary Fallin in two years, including Fallin's 2014 challenger and the last Democrat to hold federal elected office in the state.

Updated December 2, 12:27 p.m.

Oklahoma's House Minority Leader says he's taking a "serious look" at running for governor in 2018.

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Construction could resume as early as this spring on a long-delayed Native American museum near downtown Oklahoma City.

Even though the work stalled four years ago, the Chickasaw Nation and the City of Oklahoma City have almost resolved the final legal obstacles, The Journal Record's Brian Brus reports:

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

The Oklahoma City Police Department and the city’s Fraternal Order of Police have reached an agreement over the use of body worn cameras. The new agreement spells out when the cameras can, and must, be used.

Officers will be required to turn on cameras in the time between receiving a call and arriving at the scene. Police cannot roll film when interviewing victims or witnesses. Police management will be able to watch film to review operations, but not necessarily to assess an individual officer’s performance unless a citizen files a complaint.

A recent court filing says the Tulsa Police Department's policy on the use of deadly force is unconstitutional.

In November 2014, Nathan Boyd was in the middle of a mental health episode when police officers approached his vehicle, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

How Would Todd Lamb Govern?

Nov 28, 2016
Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb shorlty before the State of the State address Monday at the Oklahoma state Capitol.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

If Gov. Mary Fallin joins President-elect Donald Trump’s administration, Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb will step in to finish the two years left in her term.

The question is, would that mean status quo in policies since both are Republicans, or would Lamb’s half-term, combined with a big crop of new legislators, bring significant changes?

House Republican Conference

Oklahoma’s junior U.S. senator released a list today of what he considers 100 wasteful uses of government dollars.

Republican James Lankford’s “Federal Fumbles” report outlines what he says are inefficient grants and programs, as well as rules and regulations that Lankford says hurt businesses and consumers.

This is Lankford’s second report on what he considers wasteful spending through inefficient grants, programs, and regulations. He released a similar document last year.

Josh Gwartney, principal of the early childhood center at Chouteau-Mazie Public Schools, displays the paddle available to be used on students.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

All schools should stop paddling students as a form of discipline because it’s “harmful, ineffective, and often disproportionately applied to students of color and students with disabilities,” U.S. Secretary of Education John King wrote in a letter Tuesday to all state governors and schools chiefs.

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