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The Arbuckle Mountain Wind Farm in southern Oklahoma.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

State officials will consider recommending cuts to tax credits Tuesday as they look for a way to bring more money into the state.

Oklahoma's Incentive Evaluation Commission is meeting at 1 p.m. at the state Capitol to discuss what will go into a final report it plans to submit to lawmakers and Gov. Mary Fallin next month.

U.S. Drought Monitor

The latest map by the U.S. Drought Monitor shows two-fifths percent of Oklahoma is in moderate to severe drought, but the state's agriculture industry isn't concerned just yet.

Forecasters expect higher-than-average temperatures through November. However, a familiar pattern could spell trouble if the warm, dry conditions persist into the spring. That’s how the five-year drought started in 2011, The Journal Record’s Brian Brus reports:

Gov. Mary Fallin and her husband Wade Christensen look out from an elevator as she arrives at Trump Tower, Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 in New York.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

President-elect Donald Trump met with Gov. Mary Fallin on Monday to discuss a possible cabinet post. 

Updated 11:23 a.m.

Fallin emerged from Trump's office in Midtown Manhattan on Monday, saying she and the president-elect discussed his plan and agenda for the country and how she might be able to help.

"No, I was not offered a position. It was just an initial meeting to discuss a wide range of topics," Fallin told reporters gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower. The governor was accompanied by her husband Wade Christensen.

Earthquake damage at a home in rural Pawnee County, September 3, 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Attorneys are asking a judge in Pawnee County to approve a class-action lawsuit against oil and gas companies after the 5.8-magnitude earthquake that shook the area in September.

Oklahoma House Minority Leader Rep. Scott Inman, D-Del City, left, speaks on the floor of the Oklahoma House - May 27, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

A lot can change in 12 years.

In 2004, before the November election, Oklahoma Democrats controlled 80 of the 149 seats in the Legislature.

But after suffering legislative losses in each of the next seven elections – they lost a net of seven seats Tuesday – Democrats now hold just 32 seats. And the party may have trouble gaining back substantial ground.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., talks to supporters during the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.
J. Pat Carter / AP

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., is urging President-elect Donald Trump to make nominating the next Director of National Intelligence a priority.

Lankford and U.S. Sen. Angus Young, I-Maine, sent a letter to the president-elect on behalf of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Thursday asking him to select someone who's interested in collaborating and limiting redundancies within the intelligence community.

State Sen. A.J. Griffin, R-Guthrie (left), and Gov. Mary Fallin speak at a March 31, 2015 bill signing for a bill requiring doctors in Oklahoma to check a new prescription drug database before prescribing certain addictive drugs.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Women, already underrepresented in the state Legislature, will hold fewer seats in 2017 despite a surge in the number of female candidates.

Those results, coupled with Hillary Clinton’s failed bid for the White House, have disheartened many women in Oklahoma. Now, at least in the Legislature, women from both parties intend to form a women’s caucus.

The Nestle Purina plant at 13900 N. Lincoln Blvd. in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Union workers in Edmond are suing their boss, and the fight started over tardy employees.

Two years ago, the Nestle Purina pet food manufacturing plant started a new attendance policy. If workers were late or didn’t show up, they would lose points.

The union eventually won an arbitration that showed Nestle Purina violated the employees’ bargaining agreement and also committed unfair labor practices, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Volunteers from the Kheir Zaman local supermarket sell a kilogram of sugar for 7.50 L.E. (0.84 US cents), in the Sayeda Zeinab neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt - October 26, 2016.
Nariman El-Mofty / AP

A week ago the International Monetary Fund approved a $12 billion loan to Egypt as the country slips into a perilous economic situation created by a declining currency, food shortages, and a strained relationship with a chief benefactor – Saudi Arabia.

“What we’re seeing from one end of the Middle East to the other is no money,” said Joshua Landis, the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma. “You look at the spreadsheet for Egypt, and everything is moving in the wrong direction.”

Workers mold clay pots as part of PureMadi's water filtration efforts in South Africa.
Jim Smith / PureMadi

Since 2000, access to safe and reliable drinking water has catapulted into public awareness thanks to the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals. Amidst a proliferation of non-governmental organizations, charities and UN initiatives, the search for truly sustainable solutions to water access and cleanliness has intensified.

Raul Font is president of the Latino Community Development Agency in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Immigration dominated the 2016 presidential election, with promises from President-elect Donald Trump to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, and a clampdown on undocumented migrants from both Latin America and the Middle East.

Mass deportations could have a significant affect on Oklahoma City’s economy, especially south Oklahoma City, where there’s a significant Hispanic population.

J.D. Strong has been an influential leader in Oklahoma water issues for many years, and served as Executive Director of the state water regulator since 2010. Earlier this year he left the Water Resources Board to head the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

StateImpact talked to Strong in his new office to talk about the water challenges that remain and the issues facing wildlife conservation that are now his problem.

 

Storme Jones / KGOU

More than 100 students, faculty, and staff members gathered on the University of Oklahoma's South Oval Wednesday in opposition to an anti-Black Lives Matter and anti-Islamic protest. OU President David Boren ordered the group to leave campus, or face arrest.

A small group of so-called street preachers have come to the campus before. This time, the group took aim at sensitive issues around the country, holding signs reading “BLM Are Racist Thugs” and “Muhammad is the devil.”  

Oklahoma Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger speaks during a meeting of the State Board of Equalization in Oklahoma City, Monday, June 20, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma's top budget official says he's not worrying about a revenue failure… yet.

This time last year, lawmakers were wringing their hands over sales tax figures that painted a dim view of state revenue. That’s when revenue was about 3 percent below the estimate used to build their budget.

Oklahoma Supreme Court Chief Justice John Reif administers the oath of offices to all 101 members of the Oklahoma House of Representatives at the state Capitol Wednesday.
Provided / Oklahoma House of Representatives

Oklahoma Supreme Court Chief Justice John Reif administered the oath of office to all 101 newly elected House members during a ceremony at the state Capitol Wednesday morning.

The state's lower chamber includes 32 new state Representatives, including seven new Democrats. The new members of the minority caucus include a former assistant to the mayor of Tulsa and a former schoolteacher.

State Rep. Monroe Nichols, D-Tulsa, said his biggest priority is education, but he’s also concerned about economic development and state tax policy.

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