Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Eugene Glossip
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Updated Oct. 2, 11:54 a.m.

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals has granted the state's request to indefinitely stay three scheduled executions, citing the mix-up over lethal injection drugs that occurred just minutes before condemned inmate Richard Glossip was supposed to be put to death.

"Having fully considered the State's request, we find for good cuae shown, the executions set for October 7, 2015 - Benjamin Robert Cole; October 28, 2015 - John Marion Grant; and November 6, 2015 - Richard Euguene Glossip are indefinitely stayed," the court wrote.

The Oklahoma City Zoo's juvenile elephants Malee (right) with her younger sister Achara.
Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Gardens / Facebook

The Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden announced Thursday morning Malee, its four-year-old female Asian elephant, died overnight.

Zoo officials said in a statement they'd noticed Malee moving more slowly than usual Wednesday afternoon. But she was still eating normally. Around 4:30 p.m. they noticed discoloring in her mouth, so they initiated treatment EEHV, a form of elephant herpes.

Chesapeake Energy's Oklahoma City headquarters.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

More than 500 Oklahoma employees of Chesapeake Energy are out of a job following the latest layoffs Sept. 29, as oil prices stay below $50 a barrel. Gasoline is cheap, but that relief at the pump can fuel widespread worry about Oklahoma’s oil and gas-reliant economy.

Tulsa County Sheriff Stanley Glanz at the 2014 groundbreaking of a new law enforcement training center.
Matt Trotter / KWGS Public Radio Tulsa

A Tulsa County grand jury has concluded its probe into the Sheriff's Office, indicted embattled Sheriff Stanley Glanz, and called for his resignation.

Attorney Don Knight on the phone with Richard Glossip outside the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Gov. Mary Fallin has issued a 37-day stay of execution to Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Glossip because of concerns the state doesn't have the right drugs for the lethal injection.

Oklahoma City Council Advances Median Ordinance

Sep 29, 2015
homeless person holding a sign
AR McLin / Flickr

Nobody will be allowed on medians in Oklahoma City if an ordinance that city council advanced on Tuesday gets final approval. The prohibition would include panhandlers.

At Tuesday’s public hearing, the council heard from several citizens who oppose the measure like Derrek Jump, a veteran who advocates for homeless vets. Jump said he’s opposed to the idea of fining and jailing our poorest citizens.

Chesapeake Energy employees leave buildings after layoffs were reported Sept. 29, 2015
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Updated at 3:22 p.m.

Chesapeake Energy Corporation laid off nearly 15 percent of its total workforce on Tuesday at a time when oil prices remain low.

The Oklahoman newspaper reports that Chesapeake laid off 740 total workers, including 562 in Oklahoma City. Employees will get between 13 and 52 weeks of pay and will continue to receive health insurance and job placement help.

A group of state energy officials, researchers and industry experts issued a report Monday offering guidance on how to handle earthquakes triggered by oil and gas activity.

Ryan LaCroix / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The state will remove a Ten Commandments monument from the capitol grounds before October 12.

The Oklahoman newspaper reports that a state panel authorized the removal Tuesday of the monument, though it is unclear where it will go.

The Office of Management and Enterprise Services will be in charge of removing the monument.

Keith Dittrich (left) and Loren Broberg farm in the same part of northeast Nebraska. This summer they’ve had the right amount of rain at the right time. Even though most of their fields are irrigated, they have hardly run the sprinklers.
Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Farmers in the Midwest are facing a situation they haven’t seen in years. Grain prices are down. After some of the most lucrative growing seasons they’ve ever seen, some producers could lose money on this year’s crop. That could slow down the rural economy.