News

A worker at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial in Bosnia and Herzegovina - July 3, 2015
Val 202 / Flickr

On July 11, 1995, Serbian forces killed roughly 8,000 Bosniak Muslims in the Bosnian town of Srebrenica. The massacre in Srebrenica – the only act of genocide on European soil to be officially recognized by an International Criminal Tribunal since World War II – occurred in a designated United Nations “safe area” under the protection of Dutch peacekeeping forces, highlighting the consequences of inaction by the international community during humanitarian crises.

So how did the tragedy in Srebrenica change how the international community responds to major humanitarian crises?

President Obama speaking in Cushing, Oklahoma in March 2012.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

President Obama plans to visit Oklahoma to discuss expanding economic opportunities in Indian Country, and make the first visit to a federal prison by a sitting chief executive.

White House spokesman Keith Maley said in an email the president will arrive in Oklahoma Wednesday, July 15 and travel to Durant, where he'll visit the Choctaw Nation. He'll stay overnight before traveling to the El Reno Correctional Institution.

The medium-security facility for male offenders houses about 1,300 inmates and once housed Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh.

Exterior renderings of the proposed $40 million renovation to the Journal Record Building in downtown Oklahoma City.
Provided

Two-thirds of the Journal Record Building in downtown has a new owner after an investment group led by Oklahoma City-based Heritage Wealth Management purchased the building’s commercial unit.

The portion of the historically significant building on Robinson Ave. is being sold by the Oklahoma City Industrial and Cultural Facilities trust. The Oklahoman’s Brianna Bailey reports the trust approved a deal to sell the property for just over $7 million last year.

Engineers and demolition experts blast unstable rock from a formation in the Arbuckle Mountains after last month's rockslide along Interstate 35
Oklahoma Department of Transportation / Twitter

Few things in this world are more exciting to watch than organized, controlled destruction.

Wednesday afternoon, the Oklahoma Department of Transportation detonated a series of small charges on a rock face along Interstate 35 in the Arbuckle Mountains. The project was postponed a day due to heavy rainfall across the state on Tuesday.

A view of Broadway Avenue from the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Four months ago, Oklahoma City hit a snag on the long-awaited MAPS 3 convention center in downtown. In March, the city dropped a land bid for the location they wanted just south of the Myriad Gardens.

Oklahoma City budgeted $13 million for land acquisition, and the current owners wanted $100 million, so they had to figure something else out.

The city hired the consulting firm Populous to do that, and on Tuesday the group unveiled its site evaluations and made its pitch to the city council.

U.S. Army

Oklahoma's Fort Sill will see a 3 percent increase in soldiers in the next two years but overall troop strength at the Army base will remain 30 percent below 2001 numbers.

The Army said Thursday the number of soldiers at Fort Sill will increase to 6,746 over the next two years in a plan that will cut 1,200 or more soldiers at six other domestic bases to reduce the active-duty force by 40,000 troops.

a school classroom with empty chairs
comedy_nose / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma has been granted another one-year waiver from the U.S. Department of Education that will allow the state to avoid the implications of the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

The Oklahoma State Department of Education announced in a news release Thursday that it had been granted the waiver for the 2015-2016 school year.

State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister says the waiver is good news for Oklahomaschools, but underscores the need for an end to the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

Alberto G. / Flickr

The Oklahoma Parent Teacher Association is considering boycotting a slew of Oklahoma’s high-stakes tests, as educators continue to push back against such testing.

State PTA President Jeffery Corbett said on Wednesday that the organization will consider a resolution this Friday boycotting all non-federally mandated tests.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt prepares to greet Gov. Mary Fallin at the 2013 State of the State address at the state Capitol.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

One week after suing the Environmental Protection Agency over its Clean Power Plan, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt is filing another lawsuit against the EPA.

Wednesday’s lawsuit is over the recently finalized Waters of the United States rule, an attempt to clarify what bodies of water qualify for federal protection.

Oklahoma Conservation Commission Watershed Technitian Dennis Boney inspects damage to Wildhorse 80's spillway in Garvin County.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

More than 2,000 dams in Oklahoma have protected lives and property from flooding for decades. But age is catching up with them, and many need repairs. And this spring’s record rainfall is putting dams under even more pressure.

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