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A wall of photographs of journalists killed while reporting the news lines a wall during the rededication of the Journalists Memorial at the Newseum in Washington, Monday, June 9, 2014.
Charles Dharapak / AP

International journalism has always been a dangerous line of work. Dozens of war correspondents have been killed in every major conflict since World War II.

An artist’s conception of a southwest view of the Oklahoma City Community Foundation’s new building.
The Journal Record

Early next year the Oklahoma City Community Foundation will start construction on a new facility.

It took the foundation two tries at city meetings to get the building approved by the Downtown Design Review Committee, The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming reports:

During the first meeting in October, architect David Hornbeek presented a building design that featured a glass front, capstone promenade columns and metal awnings.

University of Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon speaks with reporters during the media day for the Orange Bowl at Sun Life Stadium Dec. 29, 2015, in Miami Gardens, Fla., two days before OU played Clemson University.
Joe Skipper / AP

University of Oklahoma head football coach Bob Stoops says running back Joe Mixon would be off the team if the 2014 altercation that ended with him punching a woman in the face happened now instead of two years ago.

The incident happened in July 2014. Mixon entered an Alford plea to misdemeanor assault charges, asserting his innocence while acknowledging there likely was enough evidence to convict him. Mixon was ordered to perform 100 hours of community service and attend behavioral counseling. He was suspended for the entire 2014 season.

Signage at Chesapeake Energy's Oklahoma City campus.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

For the second time in as many weeks, Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake Energy found a buyer for thousands of leasehold acres, and analysts are reacting positively to the transaction.

Chesapeake already sold about 40,000 profitable acres in northern Louisiana, so it wasn’t a surprise when the company announced this week it found a buyer for another swath of land in the Haynesville Shale.

The last few years have been grindingly tough for state government in Oklahoma as plunging oil prices decimated tax revenues, forcing agencies to lay off employees, shutter offices and scale back services.

Preston Doerflinger, Oklahoma's secretary of finance, speaks during a news conference in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2016.
Sue Ogracki / AP

Oklahoma’s state government will face a budget hole of about $869 million in the upcoming fiscal year, a 12.6 percent decrease from the current year, according to figures released Tuesday by Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger.

Updated December 22, 9:49 a.m.

The State Board of Equalization formally certified a $6 billion budget estimate Wednesday for Fiscal Year 2018, which is $868 million below the $6.8 billion allocated for the current fiscal year.

Oklahoma Corporation Commission

Oklahoma oil and gas regulators on Tuesday released details on new guidelines created to reduce earthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing in two of the state’s most-booming oil and gas fields.

Oklahoma City Public Schools Associate Superintendent Aurora Lora waits on Board of Education members to emerge from executive session during an April 25, 2016 meeting.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Oklahoma City Public Schools superintendent Aurora Lora sent a long email Monday to campus administrators who say morale is low and the district's leadership isn't responding to their concerns.

More than 100 principals and assistant principals signed a letter read during the December 12 school board meeting that said OKCPS leaders are "non-communicative, ineffective, and exert control by force or fear" without collaboration.

State Sen. Ron Sharp in his office at the Oklahoma state Capitol in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

A Republican lawmaker is calling for a tax increase, and a bill that would keep some further income tax cuts from happening.

State Sen. Ron Sharp, R-Shawnee, wants his fellow legislators to consider a bill that would prevent automatic income tax cuts, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

A sign along Oklahoma Highway 43 near Sardis Lake.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

President Barack Obama on Friday signed the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act, which passed the U.S. Senate in the wee hours Saturday morning. The $10 billion federal bill directs money to Oklahoma to help fix and address multiple water-related problems and issues across the state.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and Oklahoma Secretary of State Michael Hunter address the media after the state's electors cast their on Dec. 19, 2016.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

All seven of Oklahoma’s electors voted at the state Capitol Monday in favor of Donald Trump. The Republican president-elect won 65 percent of the popular vote in Oklahoma and carried every county in the state.

David Oldham, an elector from Tulsa, said he took his role seriously. He examined news reports to determine whether he thought Trump could serve as president, including Russian hacking allegations. He said there’s no proof Trump was involved in the hacks.

Iranian schoolgirls wearing headscarves, background, gather in a courtyard at a female school as schoolboys play soccer in their school in this photo taken in Feb. 2002 in Tehran.
Hasan Sarbakhshian / AP

Before he started graduate school and became a university professor, Shervin Malekzadeh taught public school in low-income and minority communities in Washington, D.C. and California.

Storme Jones / KGOU

As holiday travel ramps up, more than 350,000 passengers are expected to travel through Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City by January 7. Officials from both the Transportation Security Administration and the airport are trying to help make passengers’ rides as smooth as possible.

 

The holiday season is the airport’s busiest time of year. TSA Oklahoma Federal Security Director Steve Crawford says knowing what not to bring in carry on bags saves a lot of headaches.   

A video showing University Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon punching a female student was released to The Associated Press and other media outlets Friday.

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ordered the release last week of a video that the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters sued to obtain.

The Associated Press acquired videos showing two angles of the incident. One, which shows the altercation, is the video the OAB sued for. The other shows another angle of the incident.

Gov. Mary Fallin delivers her 2016 State of the State address Feb. 1, 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin says early projections show Oklahoma will have a nearly $600 million hole in next year's state budget. That’s nearly 10 percent of the current year's spending.

"It's going to be a challenging year,” Fallin said during a Wednesday news conference. “We've got certainly need within the Department of Corrections, which you've seen recently. We've got needs with Highway Patrol, in Mental Health Services. There's a lot of competing needs out there, for money.”

By 7 a.m. a cold front is expected to be well south of I-40. Temperatures will be falling into the 20s and 30s behind the front, with 50s ahead of the front across southern Oklahoma and western north Texas.
Norman Forecast Office / National Weather Service

A highly-anticipated cold front will likely bring the first bout of wintry weather to Oklahoma starting this weekend.

During an early morning briefing Friday from the National Weather Service's Norman Forecast Office, meteorologist Ryan Barnes said Saturday's high temperature will likely occur during the morning hours for most locations as the cold front pushes south during the day.

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett listens to a slideshow presentation on the city’s MAPS projects during a special session of the Oklahoma City Council Tuesday at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Earlier this week the Oklahoma City Council met for a special session at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City to discuss the general obligation bond to pay for city government that will go before voters in 2017.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister listens as researchers present the new A-F school report card system , December 15, 2016.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The way Oklahoma's A-F report cards are calculated may soon change. 

The State Board of Education approved a new grading system Thursday, and it will now go before the Legislature for final approval.

The new system, set to go in to effect for the 2017-2018 school year, proposes using a single letter grade with no pluses or minuses. However, the overall report card will be presented like a dashboard, with seven different criteria adding up to one score.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt arrives at Trump Tower in New York on December 7, 2016.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Donald Trump wants Scott Pruitt to run the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Oklahoma attorney general is a fierce ally of fossil fuel companies and one of the EPA’s biggest opponents. The nomination draws a sharp line dividing industry and environmentalists that could test the limits of another big fight: state sovereignty.

A Republican president created the EPA. Using words and phrases that, today, might jeopardize his career before it ever left a state GOP primary, Richard Nixon urged Congress to sign off on what he called his “environmental agenda.”

A woman serves herself a fountain drink at the OnCue Express at 1 NE 23rd St. in Oklahoma City Wednesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Researchers at Harvard University believe a tax on sugary soft drinks could save tens of millions of dollars in Oklahoma.

The so-called "soda tax" movement started in the northern California city of Berkeley, and has expanded to other parts of the country.

Harvard’s public health school released a study this week showing the tax could prevent thousands of obesity cases in Oklahoma City over the next decade, The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo reports:

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