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Book Reviews
5:22 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

A Writer Who Defied The System In 'The Zhivago Affair'

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:20 pm

What appeared in Soviet newspapers, magazines and books during the 1950s was processed through so many layers of censorship, that what ultimately emerged was mostly propaganda. Writers and poets who defied the system, went unpublished, lost their jobs and often their homes. Many were sent to the gulag, or died in the cellars of the KGB.

During the worst terror of the Stalin years, Boris Pasternak, the author of Dr. Zhivago, was left largely alone because, it was rumored, Stalin liked some of his poetry.

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Politics
5:14 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

For Interior Secretary, Getting Outdoors Is In The Job Description

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell takes a tour of the Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Townsend, Ga., last week with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge manager Kimberly Hayes.
Stephen B. Morton AP

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:57 pm

It's rare to find Sally Jewell in her Washington, D.C., office.

A little more than a year into her job as Interior Department secretary, she spends much of her time out in the field. It's unavoidable for someone who heads the federal agency that oversees some 400 national parks and nearly 300 million acres of federal lands.

"It's in the job description," she says. "It's also a fun part of the job."

Of late, Jewell has been in the forefront of the administration's efforts to raise awareness of the threat of climate change.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
4:58 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Is Unlimited Spending On Political Speech A Protected Right?

Burt Neuborne and Zephyr Teachout convinced audience members that the right to unlimited spending on political speech is not guaranteed by the Constitution.
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 7:05 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
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In 2010, the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment protected the right of corporations and unions to spend money on political speech. That decision, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, didn't affect how much money organizations could donate to political campaigns — but it removed limits on how much they could spend themselves.

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Men In America
4:51 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Learning How To Be A Man, From Mom

Derek Williams says he learned more about being a man from his mother than his father.
Brett Myers Youth Radio

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 8:29 am

This story is part of All Things Considered's "Men in America" series.

Though my mom and dad often were on the outs, I'm not one of those kids whose dad was absent.

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The Two-Way
4:49 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Arthur Strengthens Into A Hurricane As N.C. Island Orders Evacuation

The five-day forecast track for Arthur.
National Hurricane Center

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 11:44 am

This post was updated at 5:00 a.m. ET Thursday:

The National Hurricane Center announced Thursday morning that Tropical Storm Arthur has become the Atlantic season's first hurricane. The storm is about 190 miles south-southeast of Cape Fear, N.C., with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph.

In its latest advisory, the National Hurricane Center says Arthur is expected to move near the North Carolina Outer Banks this evening.

Wednesday's Post:

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The Salt
4:37 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Big Bucks From Strawberry Genes Lead To Conflict At UC Davis

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:26 pm

Yesterday, we reported on a legal tussle over control of the country's top center of strawberry breeding, at the University of California, Davis. But there's a backstory to that battle. It involves the peculiar nature of the UC Davis strawberry program.

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Around the Nation
4:31 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Florida County Goes To Court Over 'Acid Fracking' Near Everglades

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:20 pm

In southwest Florida, county officials are fighting the state over a new oil drilling process that's known by many different names: acidification, acidizing, acid stimulation and acid fracking.

Collier County has charged that state regulators have been lax in their oversight of the drilling, jeopardizing public health and the environment.

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Parallels
4:18 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

A Scottish Yarn: A Knit In Time Saves The Fabric Of Shetland Life

Ingrid Eunson sits at the spinning wheel in her home in the small town of Brae in Scotland's remote Shetland Islands. She knits yarn that she spins and dyes herself, traditions that her ancestors practiced for generations.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:20 pm

Drive around the Shetland Islands in the far north of Scotland, and at least one thing is immediately apparent: It's home to a lot of sheep. They're everywhere — wandering along the roadsides and on beaches.

In fact, there are some 400,000 of them in Shetland, where the ovine inhabitants outnumber the human ones 20 to 1.

So if you're invited to someone's home for dinner, lamb will likely be on the table. And if you're wearing a local scarf or mittens, chances are it was made out of Shetland wool.

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Movie Reviews
4:14 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Sci-Fi Kid Flick 'Earth To Echo' Broadens The 'E.T.' Formula

In Earth to Echo, Brian "Astro" Bradley, Ella Wahlestedt, Reese Hartwig and Teo Halm play a group of kids whose neighborhood is being destroyed by a highway construction project, forcing their families to move.
Patrick Wymore Relativity Media

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:20 pm

Movie theaters were swarming with Transformers this past weekend, and that'll also be true over the July 4 weekend. So this may not seem to be the best moment to bring out a sci-fi flick made on a budget that wouldn't cover catering for Optimus Prime. But "small" has its virtues sometimes, and the kid flick Earth to Echo is one of those times.

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Shots - Health News
4:06 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Can We Predict Which Teens Are Likely To Binge Drink? Maybe

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:07 pm

More than half of 16-year-olds in the United States have tried alcohol. While many of them learn to drink responsibly, some go on to binge on alcohol, putting themselves at risk for trouble as adults. Researchers still aren't sure why that is.

But it may be possible to predict with about 70 percent accuracy which teens will become binge drinkers, based on their genetics, brain function, personality traits and history, according to a study published Wednesday in Nature.

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