NPR News

Pages

Parallels
2:38 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

In A Sunny Britain, Would We Read Classics Like 'David Coppertone'?

On a glorious but rare day, a woman relaxes on a bench in the rose garden in Hyde Park on Monday in London, England. The book she's reading might have turned out much different if London were known for fair weather rather than fog.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 3:48 am

I'm not sure that cities like Miami and Rio de Janeiro truly appreciate the sun. They clearly enjoy the sun, what with their beach volleyball games and their fruity cocktails. But to really appreciate the sun, I think you have to live in a place that gets dark by 4 p.m. in the winter. A place where a typical summer day involves drizzle. A place, in short, like London.

Read more
NPR Story
1:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Debut Novel Asks: What's A Little Fakery For Family?

Boris Fishman is author of "A Replacement Life." (Rob Liguori)

In Boris Fishman‘s debut novel “A Replacement Life,” Slava is an immigrant from the former Soviet Union who wants to make it as a writer at a prestigious magazine. In order to do so, he moves to Manhattan and minimizes contact with his family in Brooklyn.

Read more
NPR Story
1:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Charles Wright Named 20th U.S. Poet Laureate

Charles Wright, pictured here in 2006, has been named the 20th U.S. Poet Laureate. (Library of Congress)

The Library of Congress has chosen Southern writer Charles Wright to serve as the nation’s next poet laureate beginning this fall.

Wright hails from Pickwick Dam, Tennessee. For years, he was a professor at the University of Virginia.

He began writing poetry while he was stationed in Italy with the U.S. Army, inspired by the work of Ezra Pound.

In announcing the selection, Librarian of Congress James Billington says Wright is a master of the “meditative, image-driven lyric.”

Read more
NPR Story
1:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Does Lockdown Training Save Lives?

Students receive training for barricading a classroom door in the event of a shooter entering their school as part of the ALICE program. (ALICE Training Institute)

New details are emerging today about the school shooting at Reynolds High School in Troutdale, Oregon, earlier this week.

Officials have identified the shooter as freshman student Jared Michael Padgett, and say he was armed with an AR-15 rifle and carrying nine loaded magazines, which could have shot off several hundred rounds. The gun and ammunition belonged to the boy’s family. Padget killed fellow freshman Emilio Hoffman and wounded a teacher.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

2 Weeks After Prisoner Exchange, Bergdahl Arrives In Texas

A video frame grab of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl released by the Voice of Jihad website shows the soldier during his captivity.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 3:25 am

This post was updated at 4:15 a.m. ET Friday:

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has arrived at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio after a flight from Ramstein Air Base in Germany, according to a Pentagon spokesman. He will receive medical treatment and will be reunited with his family.

This post was updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

Read more
Alt.Latino
1:30 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

The New Sounds Of Brazil: Artists To Watch

A mural in Rio de Janeiro.
Matthias Hangst Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:25 am

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:11 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Cool Kids Lose, Though It May Take A Few Years

As Lindsay Lohan's character (far left) learned in the movie Mean Girls, popularity comes at a price.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:07 am

Parents, teachers and cheesy after-school specials have long tried to convince kids that being cool and popular isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Now scientists are chiming in as well.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:09 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Ex-'Times' Editor Jill Abramson To Teach At Harvard

Jill Abramson
Evan Agostini AP

Jill Abramson, the former executive editor of The New York Times whose sudden dismissal last month sent shock waves through the media world, will teach at Harvard University this fall.

Read more
Science
1:03 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Maybe Dinosaurs Were A Coldblooded, Warmblooded Mix

Being a bit coldblooded has its charms, scientists say. A mammal the size of a T. rex, for example, would have to eat constantly to feed its supercharged metabolism — and would probably starve.
Publiphoto Science Source

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 4:23 am

If you go to a zoo on a cold day and watch the snakes, you'll see what it means to be coldblooded. Not much action going on — most reptiles and other coldblooded creatures take on the temperature of their surroundings, so they tend to be most sluggish when the outside temperature is cool. The monkeys, however, act like they've had one too many cappuccinos.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Legendary Actress Ruby Dee Dies At 91

Actress Ruby Dee and director Spike Lee attend a special 20th anniversary screening of Do the Right Thing, in New York, in 2009. Dee died Wednesday at age 91.
Peter Kramer AP

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:58 pm

Editors' Note: An earlier version of this post, as well as an accompanying breaking news alert, incorrectly stated that Ruby Dee had won an Oscar for her role in American Gangster. Dee was nominated for the award but did not win.

Ruby Dee, an actress and civil rights activist who built a career on stage and screen at a time when African-Americans had few such opportunities, has died at age 91.

Read more

Pages