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Why do people act the way they do? Many of us intuitively gravitate toward explaining human behavior in terms of personality traits: characteristic patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving that tend to be stable over time and consistent across situations.

This intuition has been a topic of fierce scientific debate since the 1960s, with some psychologists arguing that situations — not traits — are the most important causes of behavior. Some have even argued that personality traits are figments of our imagination that don't exist at all.

Featured Music

5 hours ago

Most of the music featured on this episode were original compositions by Nick DePrey:

Nick DePrey is a composer and music producer specializing in radio productions. He has placed music in radio programs from NPR, Gimlet Media, and KQED. He lives in Washington DC and works full-time on the NPR One app. His full portfolio can be found here: http://www.kindcreepy.com/. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

As the presidential election nears, a number of important voting law cases are still up in the air. And that can be confusing — for voters trying to figure out what they do or don't need to cast their ballots, for election officials trying to figure out how to run elections, and for politicians trying to make sure supporters get out and vote.

Here's a brief guide on where some of the big cases stand, as of the end of June. More rulings are expected, although courts are reluctant to make major voting law changes too close to Election Day.

Amid all the macro-level questions about the effects of Britain's decision to leave the European Union — its broad economic and political repercussions — the Brexit will be felt in small, practical, everyday terms as well. Although it's impossible to predict exactly how things will play out, here are a few of the possible ways Britons may experience repercussions of the Brexit:

Mobile phone usage

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The three suicide bombers who carried out Tuesday's deadly attack on an international airport in Istanbul were Russian, Uzbek and Kyrgyz, a senior Turkish official says, according to a report by the Dogan News Agency.

The death toll in the triple suicide bombing and shooting attack has risen to at least 44, Turkish state-run media announced Thursday. More than 200 people were injured. The attack has not been claimed by any organization, but Turkish authorities say they suspect the Islamic State was behind it.

Halfway through your walk to school, a wild Charmander appears. Just a few throws of a Pokéball, and it could be yours. Will you stop to catch it?

Nintendo is betting you will. Not just that, they're betting that you've waited most of your life to see a Pokémon in the real world.

Cat Causes Flood Damage At Humane Society

8 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Two suicide bombers attacked a convoy of buses carrying Afghan police trainees, killing at least 30 people, according to reports from The Associated Press and Reuters.

The attack occurred about 12 miles west of Kabul, the AP says, citing the Paghman district governor, Mousa Rahmati. More than two dozen police trainees died, as well as four civilians, the AP says.

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the bombings.

The attack involved two explosions, Rahmati told the AP.

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