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Latin America
3:20 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Ruthless Mexican Drug Trafficker Was A Robin Hood In Home State

The opening to one of the many tunnels that authorities discovered were used by Guzman as escape routes. The neighborhood of La Libertad is known for its complex drainage system, which provided easy access in and out of various safe houses.
Encarni Pindado for NPR

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:39 pm

Drug cartel leader Joaquin Guzman, known as "El Chapo," was formally charged on Monday with violating drug trafficking laws in Mexico. While officials celebrate his capture, many in his home state of Sinaloa — who viewed the kingpin as a helper of the poor and a keeper of the peace — are not as pleased.

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Europe
3:20 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

The Ukrainian Unrest, As Seen From Moscow

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And to hear how the Russians view events in Ukraine, we turn now to Andranik Migranyan. He's a political scientist and director of the Institute for Democracy and Cooperation. That's a Russian-funded think tank in New York with close ties to Russia's leadership. Welcome to the program once again, Mr. Migranyan.

ANDRANIK MIGRANYAN: Yeah, thank you for having me.

SIEGEL: And first, who in Russian eyes is considered legitimate to lead Ukraine at this point?

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Europe
3:20 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

From President To Fugitive — In The Span Of A Week

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. Last week, Viktor Yanukovych was Ukraine's head of state. Today, he's a wanted fugitive. The acting interior minister issued a warrant for his arrest on charges of mass murder. Yanukovych's main backer, meanwhile, is stepping up its criticism of the upheaval that has swept through Ukraine.

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Sports
3:20 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

For Skeleton Medalist, Path To Podium Meant Family Road Trip

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Winter Olympics are over and the final medal count is in. Russia came out on top with 33 medals. And the United States was not far behind with a total of 28 medals. Contributing to that tally was Noelle Pikus-Pace. She took silver in women's skeleton. That's the sport in which athletes barrel down an icy track on a sled, head-first at 90-miles per hour.

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Sports
3:20 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Jason Collins Returns To Nets As First Openly Gay NBA Player

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Last night, the NBA's Jason Collins became the first openly gay man to play in any of this country's four major professional sports. Collins signed a 10-day contract with the Brooklyn Nets yesterday. And a few hours later, he made his debut as a backup center in a game against the Los Angeles Lakers.

NPR's Nate Rott was at the game in L.A. and he has this report.

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Media
3:20 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Piers Morgan Shown The Door, While CNN Weighs Its Next Step

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

CNN has announced that it's canceling "Piers Morgan Live." The primetime show has suffered from weak ratings and controversy. Piers Morgan is British and a former tabloid editor and reality show judge. He was named three years ago to replace Larry King as CNN's most prominent interviewer. NPR's media correspondent David Folkenflik joins us from our New York bureau to sort through this. And first, David, why ultimately did Morgan fail? How would you characterize his approach?

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National Security
3:20 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Hagel Proposes Cuts To Size And Spending of Armed Forces

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

And we begin this hour with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's plan to cut the military. At the Pentagon today, he called for a smaller Army and Marine Corps. He also suggested grounding a vintage Cold War plane and asked troops to pay more for health care and other benefits. Hagel said his budget plan offers a new post-war vision for the Pentagon. But as NPR's Tom Bowman reports, it's a vision that veterans groups and many in Congress don't share.

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

From Mexico To Midwest, A Visit To El Chapo's Chicago

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 7:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's a very different story in Chicago where Joaquin Guzman made life remarkably less safe, dominating the city's heroin trade. In fact, Chicago served as the Midwestern hub for his cartel.

Patrick Smith, of member station WBEZ, reports on what Guzman's arrest means for the drug war there.

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Parallels
3:14 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

The History Of A Once And Future World-Class Resort

People watch the sunset Monday while standing under the Olympic rings hanging outside a train station in Sochi, Russia.
Jae C. Hong AP

President Vladimir Putin isn't the first Russian leader to try to create a world-class resort in Sochi. That story is told in one of Sochi's best attractions, an excellent city history museum.

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Shots - Health News
2:46 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Mammogram Uncertainty Gives Patients, Doctors More Reason To Talk

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 6:46 am

I am 51 years old and have had a yearly mammogram, more or less, since the age of 40.

I got them despite the fact that there is no history of breast cancer in my family. I did it because that was what my doctor and others, including the American Cancer Society, recommended.

Three years ago, I was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer after a screening mammogram. I underwent a mastectomy and chemotherapy. The doctors say my prognosis is good.

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