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3:19 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Conor Oberst Releases Intimate New Solo Album

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:04 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Since he first began attracting attention with the band Bright Eyes in 1998, Conor Oberst has been busy. He's founded two record labels, started several bands and recorded a prolific amount of songs. The Nebraska singer largely avoided releasing albums under his own name, but this week brings a new solo album. It's called "Upside Down Mountain." Reviewer Tom Moon says it's his most intimate and engaging work in years.

TOM MOON, BYLINE: It's a special talent, sounding like damaged goods on demand.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Soccer Star Landon Donovan Didn't Make The World Cup Cut

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The United States is not soccer-mad but it does have some pretty dedicated fans. And they are up in arms over news about the guy behind the most famous goal in U.S. soccer history.

(SOUNDBITE OF SOCCER GAME)

ANNOUNCER: Landon Donovan (unintelligible) for the USA. Can they do it here? Of course (unintelligible) and Donovan has scored. Oh, can you believe this. Go, go USA.

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The Salt
3:01 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

California's Drought Isn't Making Food Cost More. Here's Why

Farmworkers pull weeds from a field of lettuce near Gonzales, Calif. Salinas Valley farms like this one rely on wells, which haven't been affected much by the drought.
George Rose Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 3:48 pm

The entire state of California is in a severe drought. Farmers and farmworkers are hurting.

You might expect this to cause food shortages and higher prices across the country. After all, California grows 95 percent of America's broccoli, 81 percent of its carrots and 99 percent of the country's artichokes, almonds and walnuts, among other foods.

Yet there's been no sign of a big price shock. What gives?

Here are three explanations.

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Code Switch
2:49 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Congress To Award Highest Honor To Army's Only Latino Unit

Sgt. Carmelo C. Mathews (left) holds up a Puerto Rican flag riddled by enemy shellfire, as Pfc. Angel Perales (right) points to the protruding finger of Capt. Francisco Orobitg in Korea in 1952.
AP

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 1:13 pm

Congress passed a bill on Thursday to honor the U.S. Army's only segregated Latino unit with the Congressional Gold Medal. If the bill is signed into law by President Obama, the 65th Infantry Regiment of Puerto Rico, also known as the Borinqueneers, will join Puerto Rican baseball star Roberto Clemente as the only Hispanics to be awarded the highest civilian honor given by Congress.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Tom Rush's Rite Of Passage Song

This is the season of high school and college graduations, a time when many young people are planning to leave home. The bittersweet mood of that time is captured in “Child’s Song,” which Canadian singer-songwriter Murray McLauchlan wrote and folk and blues singer Tom Rush made famous.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Who Is In Your Thoughts On Memorial Day?

Let us know who you are remembering on our Facebook page or in the comments.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Washington Concertgoers Fill Nearby Hospital

The Gorge Amphitheater, a week before Sasquatch. When 25,000 people pack the Gorge, its population exceeds every other town in Grant County. (Jessica Robinson/Northwest News Network)

This weekend, rock and indie music fans from across the country make their annual pilgrimage to a corner of the Northwest’s farm country, for the annual Sasquatch Music Festival.

Over three days, 25,000 rollicking concertgoers turn the picturesque Gorge Amphitheater along the Columbia River in central Washington into the largest city in the county.

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The Two-Way
1:36 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

530 Years After Death, Richard III To Be Reburied In Leicester

Mayor of Leicester Peter Soulsby near a screen displaying a statue of King Richard III on Friday, after a decision to permit the monarch to be buried at Leicester Cathedral in central England.
Darren Staples Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 3:03 pm

Richard III can finally be laid to rest. Well, next spring anyway.

A British court on Friday ruled that plans to rebury the 15th century king in Leicester can proceed. His remains had been found beneath a parking lot in that city in 2012.

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It's All Politics
1:31 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Boehner Reaches Out To The Tea Party — Or Trolls Them

During a December news conference, House Speaker John Boehner rebukes conservative groups who opposed the bipartisan budget compromise.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 3:15 pm

For months, Tea Party groups had been exhorting their members to "Fire the Speaker!"

A collection of Tea Party-backed candidates have also said, if elected, they would not support John Boehner for speaker in the next Congress.

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The Two-Way
1:24 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Seeking A Boost: Italy To Include Cocaine Sales In GDP Numbers

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:20 pm

Faced with a weak economy and a need to improve Italy's debt ratio, Prime Minister Matteo Renzi's government will include illegal drug sales and prostitution when it figures the country's gross domestic product.

That's according to a report from Bloomberg News, which says:

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