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The fear of family separation is not new for many immigrants already living in the U.S. In fact, that fear, heightened in recent weeks, has been forcing a tough decision for some families. Advocates say a growing number of American children are dropping out of Medicaid and other government programs because their parents are undocumented.

Marlene is an undocumented resident of Texas and has two children who are U.S. citizens. (NPR is not using Marlene's last name because of her immigration status.) One of her kids has some disabilities.

Despite the cloudy skies that have been looming over Senegal's seaside capital of Dakar the past few days, there is plenty of sunshine in the streets.

The country's national colors, yellow, green and red, can be spotted all over the city as part of growing enthusiasm over the national team's World Cup hopes. The excitement is building as the Lions of Teranga head into their second World Cup match this weekend after their 2-1 win over Poland in Moscow on Tuesday.

It’s been another busy week on social media, with users sharing photos of protests as migrant parents waited to be reunited with their children after being separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. First lady Melania Trump also caused a firestorm over a jacket she wore to visit a children’s shelter in Texas. And New Zealand’s Prime Minister gave birth to a baby girl — and Twitter is celebrating.

President Donald Trump said he was ending family separation at the border this week. But we’ve stayed on the story, investigating the issues that remain: children being drugged at migrant shelters, asylum-seekers being denied at ports of entry and the problems with Trump’s new detention plan.

Kandace Vallejo thought she knew Southwest Key Programs: a big nonprofit based in Austin, Texas. Runs a charter school. Works with youth.

And holds thousands of migrant children in facilities paid for by the U.S. government.

That was news.

Even a professional gamer is no match for Kamasi Washington in the arcade classic Street Fighter II Turbo.

More than a decade and a half after a weeks-long sniper rampage paralyzed the region around Washington, D.C., one of its two perpetrators is likely to get new sentencing hearings. An appeals court in Virginia confirmed Thursday that several of Lee Boyd Malvo's life sentences without parole must be vacated.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Your Favorite Summer Jams

Jun 22, 2018

Earlier this week, we asked you for your favorite summer jams — the feel-good music that'll carry you through unrelenting news cycles, flat LaCroix, and incessant reminders from your mom ("HAVE YOU PUT ON SUNSCREEN YET?"). We loved your choices, from the sultry Calvin Harris and Dua Lipa song "One Kiss" to Korean boy band BTS's "Fake Love." More importantly, we appreciated your enthusiasm: "It bangs" was a common comment, along with "It slaps" and "IT BUMPS IN THE WHIP." (We may have learned some new terms).

The Great Wall of China. A walk on the moon. Genome sequencing. How did we humans, who share almost all of our DNA with chimpanzees, end up doing all that, while they ended up pretty much where they started?

Some scientists will tell you it was language, or tools, or brainpower.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In a ruling seen as a major victory for privacy rights in the digital age, the U.S. Supreme Court this morning has ruled that police need a search warrant to track people's cellphone locations. For more on what this means, we're joined by NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Nina, thanks for being here.

NINA TOTENBERG, BYLINE: My pleasure.

MARTIN: On its face, this seems like a highly consequential ruling.

NPR Earns Five 2018 National Murrow Awards

Jun 22, 2018

The Radio Television Digital News Association announced today the 2018 National Edward R. Murrow Award recipients and NPR earned five awards, the most honors of any news outlet this year.

  • In the Radio Network category, NPR and National Correspondent John Burnett were recognized for continuing coverage and reporting of immigration stories.

Seattle librarian Nancy Pearl shares her under-the-radar reading recommendations with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep. This year's picks include mysteries, nonfiction and a fantasy story for young readers.

(These recommendations have been edited for clarity and length.)

Danny Hajek and Shannon Rhoades produced and edited this segment for broadcast. Nicole Cohen adapted it for the Web.

A Guatemalan mother and her son who were caught up in the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy along the southern U.S. border have now been reunited, after more than a month apart. The two held an emotional reunion early Friday morning, at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

In a landmark decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that police must obtain a search warrant to access an individual's cellphone location information. The 5-4 decision imposes new limits on law enforcement's ability to get at the increasing amount of data that private companies amass in the modern technological age.

Growing up, half sisters Glennette Rozelle and Jennifer Mack were used to hearing their parents fight.

At StoryCorps, the women remember the night that changed everything for their family.

It was Valentine's Day, 1977. Minnie Wallace and Virgil "Glenn" Wallace were raising four children outside Oklahoma City. Glennette, then 7, and 10-year-old Jennifer, who was Glenn's stepdaughter, were home on a night that took them decades to process.

Ranking U.S. House Democrats are calling for an ethics investigation into Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. They want to know more about a land deal between Zinke's family foundation and a real estate project with ties to the oil and gas giant Halliburton.

Virtuosity — of a dazzling, ebullient, yet altogether generous sort — might be the most obvious bridge between David Holland and Zakir Hussain. But there's also a deep cultural foundation behind their musical dialogue, which forms the beating heart of a project called Crosscurrents.

On Sunday, voters in Turkey will go to the polls in snap elections called by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. These elections weren't supposed to be held until 2019, but Erdogan moved them forward by more than a year in hopes of catching the opposition flat-footed.

Here's a look at what's at stake.

Who's running?

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