Adam Brooks

Adam Brooks is Managing Editor of the Journal Record, a weekday newspaper and online publisher of business, political and legal news for Oklahoma. He regularly reports for the Business Intelligence Report, heard each week on KGOU.

Adam's work as a journalist includes more than 10 years at Internet Broadcasting System, which produced KOCO.com, along with other news websites.

Ways to Connect

The Henry Overholser Mansion is one of several dozen historical sites that receive state funding. A proposed $1.5 million cut to the Oklahoma Historical Society could cause several sites around the state to close.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Monday, Gov. Mary Fallin said she wants to take $40 million from so-called “noble but noncritical” functions to help plug a $900 million budget shortfall.

"Just a few years ago, 55 cents out of every dollar we collected went to the General Revenue Fund,” Fallin said during her State of the State address. “Today, just 45 cents out of every dollar collected goes there, and it is continuing to decline."

Five years ago, Tonia Sina was diagnosed with a blood-clotting disorder called atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.
Photo illustration by Brent Fuchs and Bryan M. Richter / The Journal Record

There’s no shortage of issues to address when it comes to the $900-million-and-counting budget shortfall over the next four months of legislative session.

The number could grow larger when the Board of Equalization certifies new numbers later this month. In Gov. Mary Fallin’s executive budget unveiled Monday during her State of the State address, most state agencies will see a 6 percent cut. Some, like the Oklahoma Health Care Authority, will take a smaller 3 percent hit.

SandRidge Energy in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

SandRidge Energy Inc. confirmed Wednesday morning it laid off 172 people at its Oklahoma City headquarters this week. CEO James Bennet said in a press release that the company would not waver from making tough decisions to protect the long-term stability of the business.

Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb shorlty before the State of the State address Monday at the Oklahoma state Capitol.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

There’s a new political foundation in Oklahoma, and some of the members’ names come up frequently during discussions about Oklahoma business and government.

Last year, Michael Carnuccio left the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs to become president of the E Foundation.

“This is a group of individuals that have created substantial economic impact,” Carnuccio said. “They're in multiple industries: Energy, obviously. Higher education is another area that we have. Aerospace. Agriculture.”

Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Two Oklahoma energy companies announced key business decisions this – one took on more debt, and the other cut spending by $1 billion.

It’s been a rocky few months for SandRidge Energy – the company’s stock has been delisted from the New York Stock Exchange, and has been in a dispute with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission over compliance with wastewater directives in earthquake-prone areas. On Monday, the Oklahoma City-based company announced it would borrow $488 million to pay for general corporate operations.

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City took another step toward finishing the troubled American Indian Cultural Center and Museum.

The Hugo water treatment plant in July.
Sarah Terry-Cobo / The Journal Record

The company that provides water services in Hugo says a customer doesn’t have standing to sue over water quality problems. Hugo resident Tara Lowrimore is suing Severn Trent Environmental Services for damages related to federal and state drinking water violations due to cloudiness and lack of chlorination.

Customers enter a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market in Luther. It is one of six stores the company is closing in Oklahoma.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, Greater Oklahoma City Chamber president Roy Williams said the U.S. Department of Justice will hold off on suing Oklahoma County over issues at the jail just west of downtown.

The jail has had problems for years, and in 2008 Oklahoma County entered a consent decree with the U.S. Department of Justice to fix overcrowding and repair issues at the facility just west of downtown.

The site of the MAPS 3 park in downtown Oklahoma City.
Samuel Perry / The Journal Record

Ever since the 2009 passage of the MAPS 3 sales tax incentive that would fund a series of civic project in Oklahoma City, residents have been waiting for the park.

The so-called "core-to-shore" vision would connect the Myriad Botanical Gardens with the Oklahoma River, with an already-built pedestrian bridge bisecting Interstate 40 and connecting the two halves of the 70-acre greenbelt.

BasicGov / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A new report out shows problems in Oklahoma’s housing market.

RealtyTrac says while foreclosures dropped thorughout the nation as a whole in 2015, they are on the rise in Oklahoma, according to The Journal Record’s Brian Brus:

Pages