Adam Brooks

Adam Brooks is Managing Editor of the Journal Record, a weekday newspaper and online publisher of business, political and legal news for Oklahoma. He regularly reports for the Business Intelligence Report, heard each week on KGOU.

Adam's work as a journalist includes more than 10 years at Internet Broadcasting System, which produced, along with other news websites.

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A sign advertising Thanksgiving weekend hours hangs in a window at Hancock Fabrics in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It’s officially “Black Friday.”

The day after Thanksgiving is one of the busiest retail shopping days of the year, but retail polling firm CivicScience expects to see 3 percent fewer people out shopping this year, which comes after down sales in 2014 as well.

Bethany Hardzinski / KGOU

On Tuesday, the first organized resistance to Oklahoma’s “right-to-farm” movement gathered at the state Capitol to voice their opposition to State Question 777, which will put the issue before a vote of the people in November 2016.

Some background: right-to-farm is the idea there’s a guaranteed, unalienable right for farmers and ranchers to earn a living free from government intervention.

An oil and gas operation in northwestern Oklahoma's Mississippi Lime formation.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

As SandRidge Energy struggles with $4.6 billion in debt and a faltering stock price that’s threatening its listing on the New York Stock Exchange, the Oklahoma City oil and gas company is facing another problem: Earthquakes and new regulations designed to slow the shaking:

A sign advertising job opportunities is displayed at the entrance of a Target store at 1200 E. Second St. in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It seems hard to believe, but November 6 marks three weeks until Black Friday, the busiest shopping day of the year and (depending on who you ask) the official launching point of the holiday season.

But retailers across Oklahoma are already starting to hire their seasonal workforce to keep up with the sharp spike in demand for goods and services.

Nationwide, big box retailers like Target say they’ll hire about 70,000 people, and Wal-Mart plans to bring on 60,000 new workers, according to Journal Record managing editor Adam Brooks.

Midtown Plaza Court
Kool Cats Photography / Wikimedia Commons

Back in June, the Oklahoma City Council voted to annex Midtown into the Downtown business improvement district, or BID.

The marketing, street furnishing, and the maintenance of the neighborhood will be overseen by the civic and development group Downtown Oklahoma City, Incorporated.

Oklahoma City Hall
Caleb Long / Wikimedia Commons

Oklahoma City won’t be hiring new staff as it copes with lower tax collections.

City manager Jim Couch said during Tuesday’s city council meeting he's implementing a hiring freeze starting November 9.

Couch said sales tax collections for October were 3.2 percent below projections, and 2.6 percent below what was collected a year ago.

beer glasses
dr. coop / Flickr (CC BY-NC 4.0)

Last week’s announcement that the world’s two largest brewers would join forces has raised questions about monopolies and antitrust issues. But on a local level, the Anheuser Busch InBev-SABMiller merger could impact the state’s beer distribution network, and affect Oklahoma’s growing craft brew industry.

The site of downtown Oklahoma City’s new convention center will run along S. Broadway Avenue.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, the Oklahoma City Council closed its meeting with an executive session, and when they emerged, it look less than 30 seconds to cap months of speculation and uncertainty over the site of the MAPS 3 Convention Center.

The council moved to pick a site known as East Park 1, located south of the Chesapeake Energy Arena from SW 3rd to SW 7th streets between Robinson Ave. and Shields Blvd.

Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

A week ago, the so-called “panhandling ordinance” dominated the Oklahoma City Council meeting, with several residents taking advantage of the public comment period to voice their concerns.

Former Chesapeake Energy employees leave the building with their belongings after the Sept. 29, 2015 buyouts.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It's been a rocky five days for Oklahoma's energy sector, with downsizing, buyouts, and even a possible de-listing from the New York Stock Exchange.