Brian Hardzinski

Operations/Public Service Announcement Director/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered. Brian returned to KGOU as the Operations and Public Service Announcement Director in January 2009. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014. Brian’s past work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, running, and playing tennis.

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Washington
11:38 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Oklahoma Senator Coburn Testifies About Government Waste

U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) testifies before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform on Thursday.
Credit U.S. House of Representatives / Library of Congress

U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) testified Thursday morning before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

He discussed his annual oversight report during the "Waste in Government: What's Being Done?" hearing chaired by California Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.)

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World Views
1:32 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Exploring Large-Scale Human Influence On Landscape And Ecology

Erle Ellis investigated nitrogen cycling across an entire village in China under pre-industrial, nitrogen-limiting conditions relative to the nitrogen-saturated conditions of 1994 to assess the role of nitrogen cycling in sustainable agricultural management.
Credit Erle Ellis

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Erle Ellis.

Over the last three decades, certain environmental scientists have started characterizing a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, to mark the moment when humans started profoundly affecting ecological landscapes.

University of Maryland, Baltimore County ecologist Erle Ellis studies how agriculture, hunting, settlements, and other human activity have changed landscapes. He estimates three-quarters of earth’s land could be characterized as anthropogenic. But even as humans influence their environment, the mass influx of residents into urban centers can reverse that process.

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Energy
12:02 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

OKC-Based SandRidge Sells Gulf Of Mexico Assets

SandRidge rig drilling for oil near Alva, Oklahoma in the Mississippi Oil Play.
Credit Provided / SandRidge Energy

SandRidge Energy is selling all of its holdings in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Oklahoma City-based oil and natural gas company announced early Tuesday morning Fieldwood Energy will pay $750 million in cash and assume $370 million in abandonment liabilities for its Gulf and coastal properties.

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Congress
9:38 am
Tue January 7, 2014

VIDEO: Coburn On Emergency Unemployment Insurance

Senate Democrats are scratching for votes to pass a White House-backed bill that would renew unemployment benefits that lapsed last month for the long-term jobless.

Speaking on Fox & Friends Tuesday morning, U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) says states that have cut the benefits back have lowered their unemployment rate and increased job formation.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

World Views: January 3, 2014

Listen to the entire January 3, 2014 episode.

Joshua Landis and Rebecca Cruise explain how Syria’s civil war is expanding into a region-wide conflict, and what affect two suicide bombings in Russia this week could have on the upcoming Winter Olympics. 

Later, a conversation with longtime Afghanistan observer Andrew Wilder about this year’s scheduled U.S. combat troop withdrawal, and April elections to replace the term-limited Hamid Karzai.

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World Views
1:36 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Attacks In Russia Could Undermine Safety And Security During Olympics

Russian President Vladimir Putin inspects ski jumping slides at one of the sites for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.
Credit Press and Information Office of the President of Russia / kremlin.ru

The Russian city of Volgograd is still reeling from two suicide bombings this week at the main railway station and on a city trolleybus that killed dozens and wounded scores more.

No claim of responsibility has been made for either attack, but they come a few months after the leader of an Islamic insurgency in Russia's south called for attacks in the run-up to February's Winter Olympics in the resort city of Sochi.

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World Views
10:58 am
Fri January 3, 2014

How Syria’s Civil War Continues To Grow Into A Region-Wide Conflict

A protester shouts slogans as others wave Syrian opposition flags during a demonstration organized by Lebanese and Syrians living in Lebanon, against Assad and to express solidarity with Syria's anti-government protesters - April 2012.
Credit Freedom House / Flickr Creative Commons

Lebanon and Iraq have been hit by a wave of bombings in recent months as the civil war in Syria increasingly spills over into its neighbors, further stoking sectarian tensions that are already running high because of the war next door.

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma and a leading analysts of Syria, says the arrest of a member of Iraq’s parliament for encouraging anti-government demonstrations in Ramadi has enflamed a sense of indignity among Sunnis in the region.

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12:54 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

The Eight Best Things Oklahoma Towns Did In 2013

Lead in text: 
The University of Oklahoma's Institute for Quality Communities reviewed some of the best things that happened in Oklahoma’s towns in 2013, from big time music festivals to smartphone apps (H/t to "World Views" contributor Rebecca Cruise).
The Atlantic Cities recently shared 2013 highlights from cities around the country.
World Views
12:07 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Looking Ahead: Why 2014 Will Be A Huge Year For Afghanistan

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry greets Afghan President Hamid Karzai before a trilateral meeting with Pakistani Chief of Army Staff General Ashfaq Kayani in Brussels, Belgium on April 24, 2013.
Credit U.S. Department of State / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Andrew Wilder, Director of Afghanistan and Pakistan Programs at the United States Institute of Peace.

In April, voters in Afghanistan head to the polls to elect a successor to the term-limited President Hamid Karzai. The controversial-at-times leader is the only democratically-elected head of state the troubled country has known since the fall of the Taliban regime in 2001.

Andrew Wilder, the Director of Afghanistan and Pakistan Programs at the United States Institute of Peace and a close observer of Afghanistan for nearly 30 years, says it’s very important April’s elections are credible, and produce a legitimate outcome.

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World Views
8:02 am
Wed January 1, 2014

Three Global Stories To Watch In 2014

A countdown to the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia taken February 10, 2010.
Credit Roland Tanglao / Flickr Creative Commons

2013 brought change in the Vatican, thousands more deaths in Syria and millions more displaced as the civil war rages with no end in sight, and the death of iconic anti-apartheid statesman and former South African president Nelson Mandela. KGOU's World Views wraps up the year by looking ahead to 2014.

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