Brian Hardzinski

Operations and Public Service Announcement Director

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered. Brian returned to KGOU as the Operations and Public Service Announcement Director in January 2009. Brian’s past work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. Norman residents, Brian and his fiancée enjoy competing in triathlons, running, playing tennis, and entertaining one rambunctious Boston Terrier named Gary.

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World Views
4:25 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Understanding Issues Of Land And Wealth For Indigenous Guatemalans

A Kakchiquel family in the hamlet of Patzutzun, Guatemala.
Credit John Isaac / UN Photo

Listen to Suzette Grillot's Conversation with Francisco Calí.

In 1996, Guatemala ended a 36-year civil war that devastated the country’s indigenous community. Seventeen years later, indigenous people in the Central American country are still seeking justice after the decades-long conflict.

“They agreed to sign not only a peace agreement, but also an amnesty law which says that all those people who committed human rights violations will not be prosecuted legally,” says Francisco Calí. He’s the only indigenous member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

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World Views
2:05 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

India Gang Rape Puts Spotlight On Broader Worldwide Sexual Violence

Protesters at India Gate in Delhi demanding the government to take action after the gang rape - Dec. 21, 2012.
Credit Ramesh Lalwani / Flickr Creative Commons

A fast-track court will give a verdict next week in the trial of four men accused in the gang rape and fatal beating of a woman on a New Delhi bus last year.

The assault caused nationwide outrage and forced the government to change rape laws and create fast-track courts for rape cases.

University of Oklahoma College of International Studies Dean Suzette Grillot says even though there’s outrage over the increasingly-common attacks against women, there’s not enough push to have an impact on the sentences these young men receive.

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World Views
11:00 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Japanese Fishing Feels Fallout From Fukushima

A Japanese fisherman prepares Sanma from Hokkaido - August 7, 2011
Credit Jamie Williams / Flickr Creative Commons

South Korea is banning all fish imports from Japan's Fukushima region because of what it calls growing public worry over radiation contamination that has reportedly prompted a sharp decline in fish consumption.

“They're trying to rebuild after all of this, and there [are] still contaminants there,” University of Oklahoma College of International Studies Assistant Dean and comparative politics expert Rebecca Cruise told KGOU’s World Views. “The fishing industry is almost devastated and they still have people that are displaced from these events.”

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

World Views: August 30, 2013

Listen to the entire August 30, 2013 episode.

As President Obama and Congress decide how to respond to the use of chemical weapons in Syria, Joshua Landis outlines some of the implications for both the United States and the Middle East.

Later, a conversation with Chad and Tara Jordan of Cornerstone International. The siblings and Oklahoma native founded the consulting firms to teach businesses and non-profits how to provide humanitarian aid more efficiently.

World Views
4:25 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Shut Up And Give? Oklahomans Rethinking International Development And Philanthropy

A family in rural Bangladesh that sells milk to Grameen Danone Foods.
Chad Jordan Cornerstone International

Chad Jordan volunteered in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, but seeing the state of infrastructure, sanitation conditions, and the lack of financial services after decades and billions of dollars of humanitarian aid affected him even more than the temblor’s destruction.

“It’s really been used for projects that are corrupt,” Jordan says. “It doesn’t really go toward projects that are really sustaining people and focusing on business.”

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World Views
4:12 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

UPDATE: Obama Says He's Considering "Narrow" Syria Action

President Barack Obama meets with his National Security Staff to discuss the situation in Syria, in the Situation Room of the White House, Aug. 30, 2013.
Credit Pete Souza / The White House

President Barack Obama says he hasn't made a final decision about a military strike against Syria. But he says he's considering a limited and narrow action in response to a chemical weapons attack that he says Syria'sgovernment carried out last week.

“We don't know how hard they're going to hit [President Bashar] Assad, but clearly they're going to hit Assad,” says Joshua Landis, a leading Syria watcher and the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma. “What Obama articulated very clearly is that we can hit him hard enough to dissuade him from using chemical weapons again. So it's worth it to try to extend that and punish Assad and make him think twice about using again.”

Obama says that attack was a challenge to the world and threatens U.S. national security.

 

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

World Views: August 23, 2013

LIsten to the entire August 23, 2013 episode.

Joshua Landis provides an update on Syria after anti-government activists accused President Bashar al-Assad's regime of carrying out a toxic gas attack, and the panel discusses the renewed focus on U.S. gun culture after the murder of an Australian student in Oklahoma.

The departing director of the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art says 21st Century art will be shaped by music, video, and other mixed media to visually express ideas in new and exciting ways. Ghislain d’Humières takes over as the CEO of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville Sept. 3.

World Views
3:41 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

U.S. Gun Culture Questioned (Again) After Oklahoma Murder

A Facebook tribute page for 22-year-old Chris Lane, who was jogging in an affluent neighborhood of Duncan when he was gunned down at random last week. Three boys— ages 15, 16 and 17 — have been charged in the Melbourne native's death.
Credit R.I.P. Christopher Lane / Facebook

The murder of a 22-year-old Australian baseball player in Duncan earlier this month has renewed international focus on U.S. gun culture and regulations.

Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies and an expert on comparative politics, says the United States portrays a certain image that the Australians are picking up on after Chris Lane’s death.

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World Views
12:58 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

What Assad May Have Learned In Egypt, And Could Apply To Syria

U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel talks to members of the media April 25, 2013, in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. While briefing reporters, Hagel announced that the White House had released a statement saying it had evidence that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad had used chemical weapons against Syrian rebels.
Credit Erin A. Kirk-Cuomo / U.S. Department of Defense / Wikimedia Commons

Earlier this week Syrian anti-government activists accused President Bashar al-Assad's regime of carrying out a toxic gas attack. Death tolls as high as 1,300 have been reported, but the government has called the allegations “absolutely baseless.”

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, tells KGOU’s World Views that video footage clearly shows something horrible has happened.

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World Views
11:09 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Outgoing OU Museum Director Says Technology Will Define Art’s Next Generation

A mural at the Venezuela Pavilion at the 55th Art Biennale in Venice, Italy.
Credit Konstantinos Koukopoulos / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Ghislain d’Humières.

The departing director of the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art says 21st Century art will be shaped by music, video, and other mixed media to visually express ideas in new and exciting ways.

Ghislain d’Humières spoke with World Views host and OU College of International Studies Dean Suzette Grillot shortly before he takes over as the CEO of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville.

“It’s an exciting trend. There is absolutely no border on the canvas. Anything could be the canvas,” d’Humières says. “One could argue that every period had a very cutting-edge, contemporary time, but I think the period we’re living in right now has been seeing a huge amount of new technology and new ways to express art.”

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