KGOU

Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

University of Oklahoma President George Lynn Cross With Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher, 1948
Western History Collections / University of Oklahoma

Seventy years ago, a 21-year-old woman named Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher walked into the University of Oklahoma’s admissions office to apply for law school. She was immediately turned down because of the color of her skin.  He didn’t agree with the decision, but OU president George Lynn Cross had no choice but to deny the request, since state law mandated the segregation of public educational institutions.

State Rep. Ken Walker, R-Tulsa, right.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

There's a lot of work that needs to be done before a bill intended to reduce the number of uninsured drivers can go into effect.

The House gave final approval May 27 to Senate Bill 359, which would allow law enforcement to use cameras and automated license plate readers to enforce the state's compulsory insurance law. It's currently on Gov. Mary Fallin's desk awaiting her signature.

Oklahoma House Minority Leader Rep. Scott Inman, D-Del City, gestures on the House floor on the final day of the Legislative session, in Oklahoma City, Friday, May 27, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

A report commissioned by the Tulsa Regional Chamber estimates the final two weeks of the 2016 legislative session was worth $50.9 million of bad publicity.

The Tulsa World’s Randy Krehbiel reports that's based on what's known as the advertising value equivalency of news coverage of a transgender bathroom bill, public education funding, and the state budget crisis:

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the time they spent in Italy over the past several weeks, and what they've learned and observed about the European migrant crisis.

Then Suzette talks with Purdue University historian Jennifer Foray about the Dutch history of decolonization, and memorialiaztion, commemoration, and responses to war and trauma in the Netherlands.

The Dutch Queen Juliana signs the document transferring sovereignty to the United States of Indonesia in The Hague,December 27, 1949.
Information Ministry / Republic of Indoneisa (Public Domain)

World War II left the Dutch Empire in flux.

Queen Wilhelmina fled to London, and Japanese occupation of Southeast Asia cut the Netherlands off from the Dutch East Indies, an expansive colony stretching from the tip of mainland Asia to the northern edge of Australia.

Oklahoma state Treasurer Ken Miller speaks during a news conference n Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 8, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

State Treasurer Ken Miller gave the 2016 legislative session a grade of “C” in his annual Oklahoma Economic Report out Tuesday.

Miller said lawmakers faced a difficult budget challenge this year as they tried to figure out how to close a $1.3 billion gap. But he says House and Senate members also left an opportunity on the table to make significant structural reforms to Oklahoma’s budgeting process, something Gov. Mary Fallin outlined in her State of the State address earlier this year.

Bottles of wine are displayed on shelves at Market Beverage Co., 204 S. Littler Ave. in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It’s been a week since the end of one of the most contentious legislative sessions in recent memory, and attention is now starting to turn to elections this summer and fall in Oklahoma.

Mayoral candidate Paul Tay argues with debate moderator Royal Aills while Mayor Dewey Bartlett and Councilman G.T. Bynum look on Wednesday evening.
Rogers State University Public Television

Incumbent Tulsa mayor Dewey Bartlett and city councilman G.T. Bynum, who’s challenging him for the post, squared off in a debate Wednesday night, and the forum’s conclusion turned contentious.

The candidates sparred over the jail, the education sales tax, and city mowing cycles, according to the Oklahoma Public Media Exchange’s John Durkee.

Kristin Henry, an attorney with the Sierra Club, speaks during a hearing at the Oklahoma Corporation Commission Tuesday. The Sierra Club is one of nine parties intervening in the case involving Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co.’s request to install scrubbers.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

A local chapter of a national environmental group is trying to reverse regulatory action on a coal-fired power plant.

Wednesday marks 95 years since the Greenwood neighborhood of Tulsa - referred to as "Black Wall Street" due to the overwhelming number of prosperous African-American businesses - was burned to the ground. Freelance journalist and former NPR reporter Allison Keyes tells the story of a manuscript with a riveting first-person account of the Tulsa Race Riot.

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