KGOU

Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

Oklahoma state Treasurer Ken Miller speaks during a news conference n Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 8, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

State treasurer Ken Miller says gross receipts to Oklahoma’s treasury declined for the 18th consecutive month, and Oklahoma’s unemployment rate is higher than the national number for the first time in 26 years.

“We keep scouring through the data to find signs of an impending turnaround, but it’s just not there,” Miller said in a statement. “Some aspects of the August report aren’t as negative as in prior months – a few revenue streams have ticked up slightly – but we can’t yet point to a positive trend.”

A team of earthquake scientists deploys 12" sensors in a field near Pawnee after Saturday's 5.6 magnitude earthquake.
StateImpactOK / Instagram

More than a dozen wastewater disposal wells in the Osage Nation have been shut down after Saturday’s earthquake – one of the strongest in Oklahoma history.

Volkswagen grill
Benjamin Shaw / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A consumer protection lawsuit the state filed against Volkswagen is on hold for another month. A federal judge turned down Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s request that the Volkswagen lawsuit should be handled in state court.

The judge wrote that a judicial panel will decide later this month whether to bundle Oklahoma’s lawsuit with others that involve “common questions of fact.”

ACT test book
Seth Perlman / AP

Eighty-two percent of high school seniors took the ACT this past school year, with more than 1,700 scoring 30 or higher.

State Regents for Higher Education Director of Student Preparation Matt Higdon said that's due to better accessibility, eCapitol’s Tyler Talley reports:

He said an expected dip in the state's composite score was expected due to wider accessibility. Oklahoma's ACT Composite Score dropped from 20.7 to 20.4 after remaining steady for the past eight years.

gas pumps
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

AAA Oklahoma says more than 400,000 state residents will travel at least 50 miles over the Labor Day holiday weekend – the highest number since 2008.

Spokesman Chuck Mai said 96 percent of that figure will travel by car, and even though gas prices are up about $0.20 since August 1, he thinks many drivers are encouraged by gas prices about $0.19 below the 2015 Labor Day holiday.

A Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market is under construction at N. Perkins Road and W. Airport Road in Stillwater.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Building permit activity indicates Oklahoma's two major college towns are having a record year when it comes to commercial development.

Stillwater saw its property valuation more than double from $34 million to $84 million between 2014 and 2015, and the city is already only $6 million away from passing that mark.

A 5.6-magnitude earthquake damaged the facade of a brick building in the city of Pawnee, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The strongest earthquake to hit Oklahoma in nearly five years shook the state Saturday morning, rousing some residents from a dead sleep. It was felt as far north as Nebraska and as far south as Texas.

Updated 6:30 p.m.

Gov. Mary Fallin declared a state of emergency for Pawnee County after the 5.6 magnitude earthquake struck the state Saturday morning, damaging buildings across north-central Oklahoma.

Workers install a glass panel on the new Bank of Oklahoma building in downtown Oklahoma City, August 26, 2016.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Tax increment finance, or TIF, districts allow developers to offset some of their projects’ costs by accessing public funding – Oklahoma City’s “Core to Shore” area between downtown and the Oklahoma River and the University North Park shopping center along 24th Ave. NW in Norman come to mind.

futureatlas.com / Flickr.com

Magellan Midstream Partners started pumping gasoline from underground storage tanks across the state Wednesday after an announcement earlier this week that 450,000 gallons were blended with three times the typical amount of ethanol.

More than 100 businesses across the state, mostly retail gas stations, received the fuel that could be up to 30 percent ethanol. It was sent from the facility between August 23 and 29. The company has set up a hotline for consumers at 1 (855) 378-9466.

classroom floor
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Figures released Tuesday by the Oklahoma State School Boards Association show about $370 million would go toward teacher recruitment and retention if voters approve State Question 779 this fall.

Supporters say the 1 percent sales tax proposal would generate $615 million per year for common and higher education. Part of that money would be used for a $5,000 teacher pay raise.

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