Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

Tornado Town, USA

May 27, 2016

Four devastating tornadoes hit Moore, Oklahoma, in 16 years. FiveThirtyEight's senior science writer Maggie Koerth-Baker investigates whether central Oklahoma's geography plays a role, or if it's simply bad luck.

Senate President Pro Tempore Brian Bingman, R-Sapulpa, left, talks to House Speaker Jeff Hickman, R-Fairview, before Gov. Mary Fallin delivered her State of the State address, February 1, 2016.
J. Pat Carter / AP

Shortly after noon Friday, the Oklahoma Senate adjourned sine die. At the same time, members of the House entered the third hour of questions on the $6.8 billion budget bill to fund state government for the 2017 fiscal year that begins July 1.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the new generation of Kosovar Albanians that are being recruited into organizations like ISIS, and a massive sinkhole in Florence, Italy.

Then Suzette talks with United Nations Special Rapporteur on contemporary racism Mutuma Ruteere. He argues one side effect of globalization is that it actually makes it easier to develop racist or xenophobic beliefs.

Workers install a stone façade outside one of four Senior Wellness Centers being built as part of Oklahoma City’s MAPS 3 program.
Samuel Perry / The Journal Record

Several Oklahoma City civic leaders gathered Tuesday evening for a town hall meeting to discuss the city’s 10-year general obligation bond issue, which voters won’t decide until next year.

oil pump jack
Paul Lowry / Flickr

A bill that would bank tax revenues to cushion the state budget during energy industry downturns awaits the governor’s signature.  

Norman Forecast Office / National Weather Service

Oklahoma could be in for another round of severe weather Tuesday.

A strong, tornado-warned thunderstorm that moved through Payne and Noble counties Tuesday afternoon destroyed a mobile home and downed power lines near the town of Morrison, Payne County Emergency Management Director Dave Lester said.

State Sen. Nathan Dahm, R-Broken Arrow, on the floor of the Senate May 17, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

The author of a bill that would’ve effectively outlawed abortion in Oklahoma wants to talk with Gov. Mary Fallin about overriding her veto.

In a press conference Tuesday morning, state Sen. Nathan Dahm, R-Broken Arrow, says he wants to address Fallin’s concerns about Senate Bill 1552.

Mutuma Ruteere, Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, briefs journalists at UN Headquarters, November 5, 2012.
Evan Schneider / UN

Contingents from around the world gathered in Istanbul earlier this week for the first-ever United Nations World Humanitarian Summit. The goal is to overhaul how aid is delivered, and to make the world safer for refugees during what the U.N. has called the world’s worst humanitarian crisis since the Second World War.

Earl Sears, R-Bartlesville, listens to questions on the Oklahoma House of Representatives floor on May 27, 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Oklahoma House of Representatives passed a $6.8 billion budget in the waning hours of the legislative session Friday. The bill was narrowly approved with a vote of 52-45 and now goes to Gov. Mary Fallin's desk for her approval.

Updated May 27, 4:43 p.m.

During floor debate, House Speaker Jeff Hickman, R-Fairview, said the budget isn’t perfect, but it funds core services.

beer bottles
Pixabay / CC0 Public Domain

The state is a step closer to changing its alcohol laws after the Senate approved a joint resolution that would allow voters to decide if grocery and convenience stores can sell wine and strong beer.

On a 30-14 vote, the chamber sent Senate Joint Resolution 68 to the House for consideration.

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