Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders. He'll talk with Suzette Grillot about what it would take for a new generation of intergovernmental organization like what happened after World War II.

But first, she'll be joined by University of Oklahoma political economist and European Union expert Mitchell Smith to talk about what’s next for the United Kingdom and the European Union two weeks after the “Brexit” vote.

Gov. Mary Fallin has ordered Oklahoma and American flags flown at half-staff on all state property through Wednesday morning.

Oklahoma's elected officials and city leaders were quick to condemn Thursday night's sniper attacks in its southern neighbor. Dallas is just over a three hours drive south of Oklahoma City. U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.), who grew up in Dallas and attended the University of Texas at Austin, met with police officers in Guthrie Friday afternoon.

Women hold posters during a protest opposing Britain's exit from the European Union in Berlin, Saturday, July 2, 2016. About 50 people staged a protest Saturday in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate against the recent British referendum to leave the EU.
Markus Schreiber / AP

Two weeks after a majority of British voters declared they wanted to leave the European Union, there’s still a tremendous amount of uncertainty about how exactly that’s going to happen.

Dr. Scott Dellinger talks with a patient at Willowood at Mustang senior living center in Mustang.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Last week the insurance industry group Genworth released an annual report that showed returns for home health care in Oklahoma fell in 2015 compared to previous years. But the costs for all healthcare segments in Oklahoma are going up, and the price of home healthcare rose 2.5 percent over last year.

That’s related to a nationwide trend of rising home care costs as Medicare providers try to keep chronically ill patients out of hospitals, The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo reports:

Oklahoma Treasurer Ken Miller talks to reporters in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Miller said Oklahoma is muddling through a continued economic downturn.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oil and natural gas production tax collections increased slightly over the past two months, although they're still well below this time last year.

Gross receipts for the month of June were $925.7 million, or 7.4 percent lower than the June 2015 total.

On Monday, Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett became president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Over the weekend, the group met in Indianapolis to elect Cornett and lay out a broad policy agenda for the next year -- much of which focused on advocating in Washington. Mayors will focus on pushing for congressional funding to combat the Zika virus, improve infrastructure and treat opioid addiction.

U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., talks with Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla. on Nov. 4, 2014 shortly after his election to the U.S. Senate
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Several Oklahoma U.S. Senators and House members say they’re disappointed FBI Director James Comey recommended the U.S. Department of Justice not prosecute presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Oklahoma’s senior Republican U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe called Clinton’s use of a private email server "obvious intentional mishandling."

Thomas Weiss addressing a retreat of UN under-secretaries-general on “The Imperative of Change” at the World Economic Forum, Geneva, April 6, 2016.
Sallysharif / Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders.

“Whether it’s climate change, terrorism, proliferation, Ebola, it simply is impossible for states, no matter how powerful or un-powerful, to address these problems,” Weiss told KGOU’s World Views.

Traffic passes by the parking garage at the Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City campus.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Three years ago, Oklahoma changed its workers’ compensation laws by saying that a person has to be clocked in or injured on the premises for the benefits to kick in. But the Oklahoma Supreme Court is raising questions about what it means to be at work.

Oklahoma City Public Schools Associate Superintendent Aurora Lora waits on Board of Education members to emerge from executive session during an April 25, 2016 meeting.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Friday morning the Oklahoma City school board named interim superintendent Aurora Lora to the district’s top job permanently. She’s led the district since the April separation agreement with Superintendent Rob Neu.

Lora said shortly after the vote she wasn’t surprised by the board’s decision, and plans to work with the community through a series of focus groups to make sure their voices are heard.

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