Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

Thom Shanker spent nearly 14 years covering the Pentagon for The New York Times, and says U.S. foreign policy should be about earning respect and trust instead of winning hearts and minds. He’ll also talk with Suzette Grillot about his book Counterstrike that focuses on the U.S. campaign against Al Qaeda.

But first, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss the North Korean Workers Party's first Congress in nearly four decades, new details about American missionary Kenneth Bae's time in a North Korean prison camp, and the cruise ship from Miami that docked in Cuba this week.

Members of the Oklahoma State Board of Health hold a meeting at the Oklahoma State Department of Health at 1000 NE 10th St. in Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Half a decade after President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law in 2010, states will be able to submit plans for their own version of the law starting next year.

Lawmakers have authorized state health officials to come up with their own plan for providing health insurance to the state’s population. It’s now on Gov. Mary Fallin’s desk, waiting for her signature, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Counselor Hannah Leftwich speaks with a student at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond. By considering multi-year budget projections, the state could anticipate demographic changes coming for entities like universities.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

When lawmakers prepare the state’s annual budget, the agencies that help put estimates together only provide information for the next fiscal year. A bill awaiting final confirmation in the Senate would require state agencies to produce three years of economic analysis for lawmakers to consider, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Todd Lindley / Norman Forecast Office National Weather Service

Two people were killed when several large, violent tornadoes moved through south-central Oklahoma Monday afternoon. One tornado destroyed several homes and left a significant trail of damage in Garvin County near the communities of Wynnewood, Roff, and Hickory.

The Oklahoma City Thunder, fresh off another excellent regular season, are locked in heated battle with the San Antonio Spurs in the Western Conference semifinals. And in the background every day has been the whispering of an unavoidable question: Could these be Durant’s final days in the team’s blue and orange uniform?

Norman Forecast Office / National Weather Service

The National Weather Service has issued a Tornado Watch for the western half of the state until 9 p.m.

House Speaker Jeff Hickman, R-Fairview, during a May 5, 2016 press conference to address Oklahoma's budget situation.
Provided / Oklahoma House of Representatives

Four stories that were trending or generated discussion online or on KGOU’s social media platforms during the past week.

Former Oklahoma Gov. David Hall
Oklahoma Historical Society

Gov. David Hall, who led the state in the early 1970s and spent a year and a half in federal prison almost immediately after leaving office, died Friday morning in California.

Former Gov. David Walters tweeted Friday saying his predecessor had passed away.

Restaurant diners watch a broadcast of the 7th Congress of the Workers' Party of Korea on local television, where North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is seen delivering a speech on Friday, May 6, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea.
Wong Maye-E / Associated Press

North Korea, past and present, is at the top of the international consciousness this week.

The reclusive country convened the Seventh Workers’ Party Congress in Pyongyang on Friday. It’s the highest political gathering the country holds, and the country hasn’t held one in 36 years, before the current leader Kim Jong-un was born. During the Sixth Party Congress in 1980, then-leader Kim Il-sung announced his son Kim Jong-il would succeed him. The second-generation Kim led the country from 1994 until his death in 2011.

An artist’s conception of the new convention center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Populous and GSB Inc.

During Tuesday’s Oklahoma City Council meeting, Ward 5’s David Greenwell said it’s hard to get excited about things like the proposed MAPS 3 convention center until you see some of the architectural renderings.

Those were presented this week, and one of the issues with this new convention center seems to be parking.

Ward 2 councilman Ed Shadid, who’s pretty vocal about his concerns when it comes to using public money for large-scale projects, raised the point during the architects’ presentation.

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