KGOU

Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

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liquor bottles, alcohol
octal / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Supporters of a state question to update Oklahoma’s alcohol laws and allow wine and strong beer in grocery and convenience stores rolled out their campaign this week.

Police officers secure the area after a bomb attack in Ansbach, Germany, Monday, July 25, 2016.
Matthias Schrader / AP

Europe continues to reel from violence that has swept over the continent in recent weeks. France is still mourning the loss of more than 80 people killed while celebrating Bastille Day earlier this month. They were killed when a man drove a truck through a crowded promenade in Nice as the seaside resort in the French Rivera celebrated the national holiday.

Anthropologist Noah Theriault contributes to the blog Inhabiting the Anthropocene, which examines how humans have influenced climate and the environment. He'll discuss this proposed geological epoch with Suzette Grillot.

But first, we check in with Rebecca Cruise, who's in Germany. The country recently saw four violent attacks in less than a week. 

Renovation continues on the Sunshine Cleaners building at 1012 NW First St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In April the Oklahoma City Council approved $550,000 in tax increment financing, or TIF money, for the dilapidated Sunshine Cleaners building just west of downtown.

About the only remarkable thing about the building two blocks from the Oklahoma County Jail is its beautiful neon sign. The roof has caved in, the windows are broken, and satellite imagery even shows an abandoned vehicle inside the building.

A power plant
Wladimir Labeikovsky / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

No matter where you land on the climate change discussion, humans have become a geophysical force that impacts everything from local ecosystems to the atmosphere itself.

“Humans are having, for a single species, pretty much unprecedented effect on their entire biosphere, such that it could possibly be recorded permanently in the geological record,” University of Oklahoma anthropologist Noah Theriault argues. “If an extraterrestrial species came down and studied our planet sometime in the distant future, they would be able to tell there was some big change right around what we would consider to be the geological present.”

But what do you call that?

A man walks by Pickleman’s Gourmet Cafe in Norman. A woman is suing the restaurant after an altercation with a University of Oklahoma football player there two years ago.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Two years after the altercation between Amelia Molitor and University of Oklahoma football player Joe Mixon, Molitor is suing the restaurant where it happened in federal court.

The lawsuit alleges the Campus Corner establishment didn't have a door man or a security guard the night Molitor was punched in the face, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., attends an organizational meeting of the House Rules Committee, January 7, 2015.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Democrats bolstered their case Wednesday night that Hillary Clinton is ready to be commander in chief, and seized on Republican nominee Donald Trump’s comments that seemed to encourage Russia to use cyber-espionage against Clinton.

“It is inconceivable to me that any presidential candidate would be that irresponsible,” former CIA director Leon Panetta said Wednesday night.

Oklahoma delegate Cedric Johnson smiles as he watches during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016.
Matt Rourke / AP

Twenty of Oklahoma’s 42 delegates went to the eventual nominee Hillary Clinton during Tuesday’s roll call vote at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. The rest went to U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who won Oklahoma’s presidential primary in February.

Delegate Isabel Baker cast the votes for Clinton. The mother of Cherokee Nation principal chief Bill John Baker was born in 1929, just nine years after the 19th Amendment guaranteed women the right to vote.

“I never thought that I would live to see this day,” Baker said.

A customer picks up her prescription at the pharmacy counter inside Walgreens at 1400 E. Second St. in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In the first six months of 2016, a database helped block 20,000 sales of pseudoephedrine in Oklahoma.

The popular cold medicine is a key ingredient in the manufacture of methamphetamine, and pharmacy counter sales are blocked if the buyer shows up on a national database. The National Precursor Log Exchange, or NPLEx, includes names of people with methamphetamine-related convictions and buying histories, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Parents and teachers attending the July 25, 2016 Edmond City Council meeting to support State Question 779.
Jay Williams / Twitter

The City of Edmond passed a resolution Monday night opposing a ballot initiative this fall that would raise Oklahoma’s sales tax by 1 percent to pay for education.

The tax hike would raise about $615 million per year for common and higher education in the state, but Edmond city leaders are worried it would hinder economic development. Oklahoma is the only state in the U.S. where cities and towns rely on local sales taxes as their primary source of revenue.

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