Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

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Oklahoma Watch

Updated April 15, 8:01 a.m.

The Oklahoma City Public Schools superintendent is "out of the office."

That's all the district's board of education said after meeting for five hours in executive session Thursday night to discuss the employment status of Rob Neu. After the meeting Board Chair Lynne Hardin said Neu has not submitted a resignation, but Associate Superintendent Aurora Lora has been assigned the additional responsibilities of superintendent in addition to her current role.

Large hail will be the primary hazard, followed by damaging wind gusts. There is also a low potential for tornadoes across parts of the area late Sunday afternoon and evening.
Norman Forecast Office / National Weather Service

Much of Oklahoma could be in for a round of severe storms with large hail and possibly tornados Sunday afternoon.

Norman Forecast Office meteorologists say the greatest threat appears to be tennis ball-sized hail and 60-70 mile-per-hour wind.

Updated 5:57 p.m.

Images Money / Flickr

Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman, R-Sapulpa, says there's growing support in his Republican caucus for a plan to rebalance Oklahoma's Medicaid population to trigger an infusion of federal funding.

“And again, it comes down to how do we pay for our share of state dollars?” Bingman said.

He told reporters Thursday the potential for 25 percent cuts to Medicaid providers could significantly affect Oklahoma's health care system.

Oklahoma City Public Schools superintendent Rob Neu addresses reporters during an April 21, 2015 news conference about the district's discipline practices toward minority students.
Oklahoma Watch / YouTube

Oklahoma City Public Schools said Friday 92 administrative positions will be eliminated in order to save about $5 million in the 2016/2017 school year. That's about an 18 percent reduction in the overall administrative workforce.

59 of those jobs will be at the Central Office, and 33 will be at campuses throughout the district. That comes on top of the 208 teacher position cuts announced last month.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the story that dominated international news this week - the so-called “Panama Papers” and the law firm at the center of the leak.

Then Cruise talks with University of Texas at Austin historian Toyin Falola, who dropped out of high school to join a post-colonial peasant rebellion in southwest Nigeria. It took the life of his grandfather, and became the driving force behind everything he does.

Toyin Falola at Sokoto State University in Nigeria, August 2014.
toyin falola / Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

When Toyin Falola was a teenager, he dropped out of high school to join the first major peasant rebellion in post-colonial Africa. The two-year Agbekoya conflict in southwest Nigeria claimed the life of his grandfather, and by the time Falola entered college, the riots shaped everything.

A protester in Reykjavik on April 4, 2016 holds up a sign displaying her anger with Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson announced he would take a leave of absence after being linked to the Panama Papers.
Art Bicnick / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The release of the so-called “Panama Papers” – more than 11 million documents and personal files detailing financial information and offshore accounts of prominent individuals – dominated the international news cycle this week. It’s raised questions about the role of technology and the expectation of privacy.

Tulsa resident Ashley Hacker exits a polling place after casting his vote on a sales tax extension proposal Tuesday.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Voters across Oklahoma went to the polls on Tuesday for mostly local elections, including a series of sales tax initiatives in both northeast and central Oklahoma.

In the city of Tulsa, voters approved three separate tax propositions totaling 0.55 percent. They deal with public safety, infrastructure, and capital projects as part of the Vision 2025 program first approved in 2003.

“The tax rate will not go up in Tulsa,” said The Journal Record’s managing editor Adam Brooks. “It’s just extending what they already have and will stay at 8.517 percent.”

Wesley Fryer / Flickr

Lawmakers passed a series of bills yesterday designed to ease the severe overcrowding in Oklahoma’s prisons. Gov. Mary Fallin outlined her goal to reduce Oklahoma's incarceration rate during her State of the State address in February. Oklahoma has the highest number of females behind bars per capita in the U.S., and the rate of incarcerated men ranks near the top as well.

Students in Stephanie Gragg’s English class prepare for a test at Midwest City High School.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

State lawmakers could be close to eliminating end-of-instruction tests in favor of a single exam that’s recognized across the country.

House Bill 1622 gets rid of nine exams that all students take, but aren’t required by federal law. The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports the bill also lets the State Department of Education decide which tests high schoolers take to graduate:

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