Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

House Speaker-designate Charles McCall talks with fellow Republicans outside the GOP caucus room in the Oklahoma state Capitol Monday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Lawmakers decided who the next speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives will be during a closed-door meeting Monday. State Rep. Charles McCall, R-Atoka, defeated state Rep. Earl Sears, R-Bartlesville, for the leadership spot.

Sears, who’s the chairman of the House Appropriations and Budget Committee, will have to give up his House seat in 2018 due to term limits. McCall, who was first elected to the House in 2012, won’t be term-limited until 2024, although GOP caucus rules prevent a speaker from holding the post longer than four years, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Norman Forecast Office / National Weather Service

Oklahoma saw the 7th-wettest April on record, despite kicking off 2016 with fears of a strengthening drought. Oklahoma Mesonet stations recorded a statewide average of 6.11 inches of rain last month.

State Climatologist Gary McManus says extreme and violent weather bookended the month. An uncontrollable wildfire started April 5 and hundreds of thousands of acres in Northwest Oklahoma.

“Emergency management personnel estimated damages at $2.3 million from the fire as it scorched nearly 90 square miles in Woodward and Harper counties,” McManus said.

Oklahoma state Rep. Earl Sears, R-Bartlesville, is pictured during a committee meeting in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, May 13, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

It’s now the final month of the legislative session, and lawmakers have less than four weeks to pull off a budget deal to close a $1.3 billion shortfall for the fiscal year that begins July 1. Will they get it done?

“Yes,” state Sen. Mike Schulz, R-Altus, told reporters Thursday. “I want to go home.”

Oklahoma's constitution requires the legislature to adjourn on the final Friday in May. Lawmakers have discussed wrapping up their work a week early, which they’ve done every year since 2012.

Syrian interior opposition member Mahmoud Marai, third right, listens to Elian Mous'ad, second right, during a meeting with the UN Syria Envoy during Syria peace talks at the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.
Fabrice Coffrini / Pool Photo via Associated Press

February’s tenuous cease-fire in Syria seems to breaking down for good.

Opposition leaders blame airstrikes around Aleppo have been blamed on both the Russian and Syrian forces. Civilians and doctors were killed when a Doctors Without Borders hospital was hit this week in the northern city.

An overturned car on Interstate 35 at Main Street in Norman Friday afternoon. All the occupants were safe.
Gabe Garfield / Twitter

Central and southern Oklahoma is in the middle of another round of severe weather, three days after small tornadoes and large hail struck Mustang, Luther, and the Tulsa area.

Updated 5:34 p.m.

The threat of tornadoes and severe weather has moved east out of the Oklahoma City metro, but flooding is now a major concern as heavy rain continues to fall across the region.

Joshua Landis joins Rebecca Cruise to discuss this week's airstrikes in Syria, and the Obama administration's decision to send more troops to the region.

Then Rebecca talks with activist Selma Hadzihalilovic. She was just 16 when war broke out in Bosnia in the 1990s, and she started working with a shelter for women who were raped by soldiers as a psychological warfare tactic. She won the University of Oklahoma’s 20-16 Clyde Snow Social Justice Award, and we’ll hear from her later this half-hour.

$100 bills, money, cash
401(K) 2012 / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Gov. Mary Fallin signed a bill Thursday that would allow Oklahomans whose assets are seized through the civil asset forfeiture process to recover their attorney fees.

State Sen. David Holt, R-Oklahoma City, says his legislation will encourage people to fight back if their property is taken.

State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister testifies February 10 before the House Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education.
Edworkforce Committee / Flickr (Public Domain)

State officials are telling schools to brace for one more round of cuts before summer.

State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister told districts $13 to 17 million will be cut from school funding in the next month.

"This is really going to be gut-wrenching for districts to receive this news at this time at such a truly large amount of money,” Hofmeister said.

That will affect schools' abilities to pay their bills, and may force them to dip into any savings they may have. Hofmeister blamed the cuts on lower-than-expected gross production tax revenue.

Dr. Billy D. Schumpert, left, checks on Debbie Brewer at Eastern Oklahoma Medical Center in Poteau on Tuesday while Kody Smith, infection preventionist and registered nurse, looks on.
Amanda Corbin / Poteau Daily News

Proposed cuts to Oklahoma’s Medicaid reimbursement rate that could be as high as 25 percent are threatening the services offered by rural hospitals across the state.

Selma Hadzihalilovic
Ambassador Swanee Hunt / Blogspot

Selma Hadzihalilovic didn’t seek out activism. It found her.

She was just a teenager when war broke out in her native Bosnia and Herzegovina. She was training to become a nurse at a medical high school when the conflict between Croats and Serbs turned her life upside down.

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