Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski is from Flower Mound, Texas and a graduate of the University of Oklahoma. He began his career at KGOU as a student intern, joining KGOU full time in 2009 as Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015-16. Brian’s work at KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists. Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier, Bucky.

Attorney John Hunsucker stands next to a breath testing machine.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

A court decision earlier this week might keep the state from revoking thousands of driver’s licenses.

Monday's ruling means the outcome of a breathalyzer test that leads to criminal charges can't be used to take away someone's driving privileges, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Former CEO of Chesapeake Energy, Aubrey McClendon was killed in an automobile accident March 2nd, a day after being indicted on corruption charges.
Scott Detrow / StateImpact Pennsylvania

One of Oklahoma City's most prominent energy executives was also a prolific philanthropist, and his death earlier this year left many charities with unpaid pledges.

Even though Aubrey McClendon owed thousands of dollars at the time of his fatal car crash in March, the charities aren't fighting it, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Officer Betty Shelby
Tulsa County Jail

Tulsa County jail records show the police officer charged with manslaughter in last week's shooting death of an unarmed black man surrendered to authorities early Friday morning.

Officer Betty Shelby was arrested at 1:00 a.m., booked at 1:11 a.m., and released at 1:31 a.m. after posting $50,000 bond.

Shekeyra Goodman sets a table in an event room Tuesday at the Embassy Suites Oklahoma City Downtown/Medical Center.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, the Oklahoma Hotel and Lodging Association held its annual forecasting luncheon at the Skirvin in downtown Oklahoma City. The group’s figures show hotel demand in the state dropped 3.5 percent, while the supply was up 2.9 percent.

One of the presenters, Jan Freitag, basically said this decline all has to do with the price of oil, and that the demand for hotel rooms used to grow by 8 percent annually.

Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler speaks to reporters Thursday after filing charges against Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby
John Durkee / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Prosecutors filed felony charges Thursday against a Tulsa police officer involved in the shooting death of an unarmed black man. The charges come less than a week after Terence Crutcher was shot Friday.

OWRB Executive Director J.D. Strong (left) addresses members of the water board at its Oct. 23, 2013 meeting.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

One of Oklahoma's top water officials will have a new job a little less than a month from now.

J.D. Strong will become the state Department of Wildlife Conservation’s executive director after six years leading the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

He’ll transition in October after the Governor’s Water Conference is over, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

The Rev. Al Sharpton, center, speaks to the media at the National Action Center in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016 about the shooting death of Terence Crutcher in Tulsa. He's joined by Attorney Benjamin Crump (right), and Crutcher's father (bow tie).
Joseph Frederick / AP

The Rev. Al Sharpton says he's planning a rally in Tulsa on Tuesday to demand justice for the family of an unarmed black man killed Friday by a white police officer.

The civil rights leader called allegations Terence Crutcher may have been under the influence of drugs "bogus."

"Let a jury hear the facts,” Sharpton said. “But don't try and smear this young man in death as you smeared his blood in that highway."

Pastor Jennettie Marshall, of Living Sanctuary Evangelistic Ministries, speaks at a "protest for justice" over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher, sponsored by We the People Oklahoma, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Gov. Mary Fallin is urging Tulsa residents to remain calm as authorities investigate a white police officer's fatal shooting of an unarmed black man.

Stacey Haynes goes over spelling words with her third-grade class in Washington, Okla.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

State Question 779 could bring in millions for schools in the Oklahoma City metro, but the proportional breakdown means the smallest districts would receive just a few thousand dollars.

Though the rate of earthquakes “has declined from its peak,” the 5.8-magnitude earthquake near Pawnee has made 2016 the most seismically active year on record “as measured by seismic energy release,” Oklahoma Geological Survey Director Jeremy Boak tells the Enid News‘ Sally Asher.

School buses are parked at the Oklahoma City Public Schools Operations Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

For 22 years, the state miscalculated how much property tax should go back to local school districts. That means hundreds of campuses lost money over that time period, while the rest got more than they deserved.

Some Oklahoma school districts are now going after millions of dollars they say were applied the wrong way, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump arrives at the home of Hunter and Kathy Miller in Norman for a fundraiser Saturday, September 17, 2016.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump spent a little over an hour in Norman Saturday afternoon, courting campaign donors just a few blocks from the campus of the University of Oklahoma.

More than 100 demonstrators gathered near the private residence where the fundraiser was held, protesting Trump’s views on race, immigration, and the economy.

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump appears at a rally in Oklahoma City on February 26, 2016.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump will be in Norman Saturday afternoon for a fundraiser just a few blocks from the University of Oklahoma campus.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss Italy's response to drug trafficking through North Africa, and how it's affecting groups like the Islamic State, who are fighting over the region.


Then Grillot talks with journalist and author Maria Armoudian. Her latest book tells the book tells the stories of reporters who cover war zones, the challenges of shrinking budgets, and censorship.

Swaths of cannabis in northern Morocco. The U.N. estimates 80,000 families in the rugged northern Rif mountains make their living from growing marijuana. Their efforst have made Morocco the main hashish supplier for Europe and the world.
Abdeljalil Bounhar / AP

Since 2013, European Union officials have seized hundreds of tons of hashish, worth more than $3 billion, from 20 ships traversing a lucrative drug trafficking route across the Mediterranean.

The drugs flow through multiple countries – Morocco, Libya, Egypt, and some Balkan states – and even areas controlled by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants, who are taxing the shipments as it goes through their territory.

Maria Armoudian
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Maria Armoudian’s first book explored the role radio played in exploiting deeply-held divisions between Hutus and Tutsis during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide.

The abandoned Lantana Apartments complex at 7408 NW 10th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The big news that came out of this week’s Oklahoma City Council meeting involved the body formally voicing its opposition to State Question 777 – the so-called “right-to-farm” proposal.

The Dallas Morning News' SportsDay reporter Chuck Carlton analyzes University of Oklahoma president David Boren's comments Wednesday about the possibility of expanding the athletic conference.

Oklahoma City Council member Pete White, left, and council attorney Kenneth Jordan in a council meeting at City Hall.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Oklahoma City Council passed a resolution Tuesday formally opposing State Question 777, which is commonly known as the “right-to-farm” amendment. The proposal would add a new section to state law guaranteeing farmers and ranchers can operate without interference unless the state has a compelling reason to get involved.

Rachel Jenkins, 32, was denied further treatment after a doctor hired by her company said she had a shoulder condition caused by aging, not her work accident. "What's age got to do with anything?" she asked.
Nick Oxford / ProPublica

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled Tuesday companies cannot opt-out of the 2013 workers’ compensation law.

The court’s 7-2 decision says the opt-out act’s provision “creates impermissible, unequal, disparate treatment of a select group of workers,” and is unconstitutional. The ruling comes two years and two days after Dillard’s employee Jonnie Vasquez was injured while working at a Dillard’s.