Brian Hardzinski

KGOU Digital News Editor/Morning Edition Host

Brian Hardzinski grew up in Flower Mound, Texas but came to the University of Oklahoma for college. He began his career at KGOU as an unpaid student intern assisting with various production and operations tasks, before spending two years producing and hosting Assignment: Radio and occasionally filling in during All Things Considered.

Brian joined KGOU full time in 2009 as the station's Operations and Public Service Announcement Director. He began regularly hosting Morning Edition in 2014, and became the station's first Digital News Editor in 2015. Brian’s work with KGOU has been honored by Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI), the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters, the Oklahoma Associated Press Broadcasters, and local and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Brian graduated from OU in 2008 with degrees in Broadcast Journalism and History. A Norman resident, Brian enjoys competing in triathlons, distance running, playing tennis, and entertaining his rambunctious Boston Terrier named Bucky.

Ways to Connect

An Edmond Postal employee is consoled following a shooting spree that left 15 people, including the shooter, dead at the Edmond Post Office, Wednesday, August 20, 1986 in Edmond. An additional six people were injured in the shooting.
David Longstreath / AP

Saturday marks 30 years since a disgruntled former employee shot 20 of his colleagues at the U.S. Post Office in Edmond, killing 14.

Three decades later, gun deaths in Oklahoma are still higher than the national average, and University of Oklahoma College of Public Health Dean Gary Raskob told The Journal Record's Sarah Terry-Cobo scientific research should play a role in crafting laws to address gun violence:

The Wheeler Ferris Wheel is shown behind signage at Oklahoma City’s Wheeler District.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday the Oklahoma City Council took another step toward creating a tax increment financing, or TIF, district for the Wheeler neighborhood near downtown, just south of the Oklahoma River.

The area on either side of Western Ave. north of SW 20th Street will eventually have housing, offices, retail, and the centerpiece has already gone up - a 100-foot tall Ferris wheel.

SandRidge Energy Inc. facilities superintendent Andy Ferguson, left, opens the valve at one of the company’s shuttered disposal wells on Aug. 10.
Sarah Terry-Cobo / The Journal Record

Two pairs of Logan County residents have dropped legal action against a quartet of Oklahoma energy companies.

Lisa Griggs and April Marler alleged their homes were damaged from earthquakes that were caused by New Dominion and subsidiaries of Chesapeake Energy, Devon Energy, and SandRidge Energy. Brenda Lene and Jon Darryn Lene also say their home was damaged by earthquakes caused by water injection. 

Gov. Mary Fallin, second from right, and her husband, Wade Christensen, second from left, greet Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, following a rally in Oklahoma City, Friday, Feb. 26, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / Associated Press

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump named four Oklahomans to his newly created Agriculture Advisory Committee Tuesday. Gov. Mary Fallin is the highest profile Oklahoman on the panel.

“The Trump administration will work closely with farmers, ranchers and other agricultural producers to ensure their issues and concerns are being addressed,” Fallin said in a statement.

The 64-member committee also includes state Agriculture Secretary Jim Resse, state Sen. Eddie Fields and state Rep. Casey Murdock.

Oklahoma City University economist Russell Evans, at lectern, addresses the Oklahoma City Council Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City University economist Russell Evans told city council members during Tuesday's meeting there's still a lot of economic uncertainty. 

Evans typically speaks to the city council in February when it’s time to plan the annual budget. But he was asked to give a special presentation after some council members pointed out that the city was suffering more than usual for its ties to the oil and gas industry, The Journal Record’s Brian Brus reports:

Workers continue construction of a Hibdon Tires Plus at University Town Center in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It’s not in decline, but national construction spending is slowing, according to industry group Associated Builders and Contractors. But some Oklahoma companies are in hiring home.

The state saw a 6.9 percent increase in construction jobs from June 2015 to June 2016, The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming reports:

Using a growing body of research, along with trial and error, scientists and state regulators are getting closer to pinpointing the cause of the startling increase in earthquakes in the central and eastern parts of the country, and preventing them.

United States' Alexander Naddour performs on the pommel horse during the artistic gymnastics men's apparatus final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016.
Julio Cortez / AP

Former University of Oklahoma gymnast Alex Naddour earned the bronze medal in the men’s individual pommel horse final Sunday afternoon during the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

It's the first medal in the event for the United States since Tim Daggett also took bronze in 1984.

The statue known as "Jesus Wept" near the Oklahoma City National Memorial.
David J. Phillip / AP

Religious leaders held a unity walk and a prayer service Monday’s evening in Oklahoma City as an alternative to a black mass scheduled at the Civic Center Music Hall.

Updated August 16, 9:48 a.m.

Color-coded ballots for each Oklahoma County district are pictured at the Oklahoma County Board of Elections in Oklahoma City, Thursday, June 23, 2016. The ballots are color-coded according to party.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahomans may not be able to vote for two presidential candidates this fall, including one high-profile third-party hopeful.

Green Party nominee Jill Stein and independent candidate Rocky de la Fuente are taking legal action to try to get on the ballot in November by arguing Oklahoma’s ballot access laws are too strict, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

The lawsuit is joined by several voters who support the candidates.

health insurance cards and dollar bills
Lindsey Whelchel / Oklahoma Watch

A state panel recommended across-the-board rate increases Thursday for state employees' health insurance next year. The increases range from 6 percent to almost 16 percent, depending on the plan that someone chooses.

That’s the biggest bump since at least 2010, but officials told The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt it’s necessary to cover rising healthcare costs:

Russia's Yulia Efimova, left, looks on as United States' Lilly King celebrates after winning the gold medal in the women's 200-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.
Michael Sohn / AP

Beyond the athletic competition, feats of strength, and patriotic triumph, the Olympics serve as a moment where countries can come together and put their differences aside. But politics has played out during the first week of competition.

In the early 1900s, opponents of the Shah wrote a constitution and established a parliament in Iran. 
Suzette Grillot talks with Boston University historian Houchang Chehabi about Iran’s brief 20th century experiment with democracy.

But first, Rebecca Cruise joins the show to talk about some of the positive and negative moments of sportsmanship in the Olympics.

A female supporter of the Iranian opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi flashes a victory sign during a July 17, 2009 rally.
Unknown / Obtained By AP

Iran flirted with democracy during the early part of the 20th century, but it didn’t quite stick.

Midwest City’s Heritage Park Mall.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It’s been about six years since the last few tenants moved out of Heritage Park Mall in Midwest City.

A lone retailer remains – Sears – and a local megachurch also holds it services there, but city leaders hope to revitalize the property and have issued a request for proposals to rehabilitate it.

The Journal Record’s editor Ted Streuli says the idea has been in the works for years, but recently the city council in Midwest City approved a matching $27,000 grant for requests for proposals. The money would come out of Midwest City’s Fiscal Year 2017 budget.