David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. To report on former President George W. Bush's second term, Greene spent hours in NPR's spacious booth in the basement of the West Wing (it's about the size of your average broom closet). He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

During the days following Hurricane Katrina, Greene was aboard Air Force One when President Bush flew low over the Gulf Coast and caught his first glimpse of the storm's destruction. On the ground in New Orleans, Greene brought listeners a moving interview with the late Ethel Williams, a then-74-year-old flood victim who got an unexpected visit from the president.

Greene was an integral part of NPR's coverage of the historic 2008 election, covering Hillary Clinton's campaign from start to finish, and also focusing on how racial attitudes were playing into voters' decisions. The White House Correspondents Association took special note of Greene's report on a speech by then-candidate Barack Obama, addressing the nation's racial divide. Greene was given the association's 2008 Merriman Smith award for deadline coverage of the presidency.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House during the Bush administration's first term, and wrote about an array of other topics for the paper: Why Oklahomans love the sport of cockfighting, why two Amish men in Pennsylvania were caught trafficking methamphetamine and how one woman brought Christmas back to a small town in Maryland.

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

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Books
7:04 am
Wed December 3, 2014

The 2014 Book Concierge Is Here To Help You Find Your Next Great Read

Originally published on Wed December 3, 2014 7:53 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
7:41 am
Tue November 11, 2014

43 On 41: A President Traces The Life Of His Father

Former President George W. Bush (right) and his father, former President George H.W. Bush, wave as they leave a family wedding in Washington, D.C., in May 2006.
Normand Blouin-Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 12, 2014 8:16 am

Only twice in American history has a son followed his father into the presidency. The first was John Quincy Adams. The second, George W. Bush, has now written a biography of his father, George H.W. Bush. It's called 41: A Portrait of My Father.

The 43rd president of the United States traces the life of the 41st from his youth in New England through his entry into the Texas oil business, combat during World War II, party politics, diplomacy, the White House, retirement — and skydiving.

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This is NPR
8:06 am
Wed November 5, 2014

'Morning Edition' Celebrates 35 Years With A Trip Down Memory Lane

Bob Edwards was the host of Morning Edition from its 1979 inception until 2004.
Max Hirshfeld NPR

Originally published on Wed November 5, 2014 1:32 pm

On this day in 1979, Morning Edition broadcast its first show, bringing a new style of storytelling to the early-drive-time airwaves.

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World
3:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

With Shift From Ukraine To Russia, Crimea's Business And Pleasure Uprooted

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 8:23 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
3:29 am
Fri October 31, 2014

As Crimea's Borders Change, So Do Lives

Valentin Danilov, 83, is a former executive officer on a Soviet sub who proudly wears his old Soviet military uniform. Crimeans like Danilov have, without changing their residence, lived in three different countries in the past 25 years — the Soviet Union, then Ukraine and now Russia.
Max Avdeev for NPR

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 8:04 am

It's like a scene from an old Soviet movie playing out before our eyes in 2014.

Dozens of young Crimeans, with innocent faces and crisp blue uniforms, stand at attention and declare oaths of loyalty to Russia.

They are the first class of Crimean recruits training to be officers in Russia's Interior Ministry. Many will likely serve in the domestic security service, the modern-day KGB. Soviet music blares as the young trainees march beneath the looming statue of Lenin in the city square.

Nearby, the Russian flag flaps above a government building.

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World
3:46 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Crimean Tatar's History A Backdrop For Current Pressures

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 1:25 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're turning again to Crimea this morning. And, David, you roamed around that peninsula that Russia took over this past spring and are bringing us, all this week, stories from there.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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World
4:00 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Tatar Men Disappear In Crimea, And Families Fill With Dread

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 7:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
3:39 am
Tue October 28, 2014

Crimean Tatars Pressured To Become Russian Citizens

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 12:17 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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World
3:36 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Closed McDonald's In Moscow Taken As A Political Message

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 6:32 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
3:36 am
Mon October 27, 2014

In Crimea, Many Signs Of Russia, Few Of Resistance

Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships.
Max Avdeev for NPR

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 8:08 am

Morning Edition host David Greene and producer Lauren Migaki traveled to Crimea to see what's changed since Russia sent troops in this spring and shortly afterward annexed the territory despite widespread international criticism. Their stories will be on air and online this week.

We're traveling through flat farmland on a two-lane road in the far north of Crimea, when suddenly it's interrupted by a checkpoint. Actually, Russia now considers it the border, a physical reminder of the new divide between Russia and Ukraine — and the West.

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