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David Greene

David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

Greene's voice became familiar to NPR listeners from his four years covering the White House. To report on former President George W. Bush's second term, Greene spent hours in NPR's spacious booth in the basement of the West Wing (it's about the size of your average broom closet). He also spent time trekking across five continents, reporting on White House visits to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Rwanda, Uruguay – and, of course, Crawford, Texas.

During the days following Hurricane Katrina, Greene was aboard Air Force One when President Bush flew low over the Gulf Coast and caught his first glimpse of the storm's destruction. On the ground in New Orleans, Greene brought listeners a moving interview with the late Ethel Williams, a then-74-year-old flood victim who got an unexpected visit from the president.

Greene was an integral part of NPR's coverage of the historic 2008 election, covering Hillary Clinton's campaign from start to finish, and also focusing on how racial attitudes were playing into voters' decisions. The White House Correspondents Association took special note of Greene's report on a speech by then-candidate Barack Obama, addressing the nation's racial divide. Greene was given the association's 2008 Merriman Smith award for deadline coverage of the presidency.

After President Obama took office, Greene kept one eye trained on the White House and the other eye on the road. He spent three months driving across America – with a recorder, camera and lots of caffeine – to learn how the recession was touching Americans during President Obama's first 100 days in office. The series was called "100 Days: On the Road in Troubled Times."

Before joining NPR in 2005, Greene spent nearly seven years as a newspaper reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He covered the White House during the Bush administration's first term, and wrote about an array of other topics for the paper: Why Oklahomans love the sport of cockfighting, why two Amish men in Pennsylvania were caught trafficking methamphetamine and how one woman brought Christmas back to a small town in Maryland.

Before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard in 1998 with a degree in government, Greene worked as the senior editor on the Harvard Crimson. In 2004, he was named co-volunteer of the year for Coaching for College, a Washington, D.C., program offering tutoring to inner-city youth.

All eyes are on Nevada in the final days leading up to the election. Polls in this swing state show that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are neck and neck. With such a nasty campaign, NPR wondered how much tension filters down to Nevada voters. We visited a quiet neighborhood 20 minutes west of the Las Vegas strip and met two neighbors who live across the street from each other — one Republican and one Democrat.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Until a few days ago, if you visited www.clintonkaine.com, you'd find a story.

JEREMY PETER GREEN: Timartinus (ph) Kaine - he would help Hillary vanquish Don Marvolo Trump, known in popular parlance as He Who Must Not Be Elected.

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., attends an organizational meeting of the House Rules Committee, January 7, 2015.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Democrats bolstered their case Wednesday night that Hillary Clinton is ready to be commander in chief, and seized on Republican nominee Donald Trump’s comments that seemed to encourage Russia to use cyber-espionage against Clinton.

“It is inconceivable to me that any presidential candidate would be that irresponsible,” former CIA director Leon Panetta said Wednesday night.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Oklahoma, gestures as he speaks during a Town Hall meeting in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.) says he plans to support presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

Cole told NPR’s Morning Edition Thursday he's interested in Trump's positions on tax reform and deregulation. But he also called Trump a "shoot from the hip" candidate," and said he doesn't like the New York businessman's tendency to make provocative statements.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID REENE, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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