Deborah Amos

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Amos travels extensively across the Middle East covering a range of stories including the rise of well-educated Syria youth who are unqualified for jobs in a market-drive economy, a series focusing on the emerging power of Turkey and the plight of Iraqi refugees.

In 2009, Amos won the Edward Weintal Prize for Diplomatic Reporting from Georgetown University and in 2010 was awarded the Edward R. Murrow Life Time Achievement Award by Washington State University. Amos was part of a team of reporters who won a 2004 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award for coverage of Iraq. A Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1991-1992, Amos was returned to Harvard in 2010 as a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School.

In 2003, Amos returned to NPR after a decade in television news, including ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight and the PBS programs NOW with Bill Moyers and Frontline.

When Amos first came to NPR in 1977, she worked first as a director and then a producer for Weekend All Things Considered until 1979. For the next six years, she worked on radio documentaries, which won her several significant honors. In 1982, Amos received the Prix Italia, the Ohio State Award, and a DuPont-Columbia Award for "Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown" and in 1984 she received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Refugees."

From 1985 until 1993, Amos spend most of her time at NPR reporting overseas, including as the London Bureau Chief and as an NPR foreign correspondent based in Amman, Jordan. During that time, Amos won several awards, including an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award and a Break thru Award, and widespread recognition for her coverage of the Gulf War in 1991.

A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Amos is also the author of Eclipse of the Sunnis: Power, Exile, and Upheaval in the Middle East (Public Affairs, 2010) and Lines in the Sand: Desert Storm and the Remaking of the Arab World (Simon and Schuster, 1992).

Amos began her career after receiving a degree in broadcasting from the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Middle East
4:15 am
Wed September 17, 2014

What Does It Mean To Be A Moderate In Syria's Civil War?

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 6:50 pm

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World
3:34 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Kerry Courts Support For Obama's ISIS Plan In Paris

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 4:11 pm

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Europe
5:08 am
Mon September 15, 2014

More Allies Express Desire To Help Fight Against ISIS

Originally published on Mon September 15, 2014 9:02 am

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Middle East
3:57 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Mideast Region Reacts To Obama's Speech With Skepticism

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 7:24 am

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Middle East
3:33 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

ISIS Convenient For Assad's Narrative On Civil War

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 5:29 pm

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Parallels
2:43 am
Tue September 9, 2014

How The Islamic State Smuggles Oil To Fund Its Campaign

Smoke rises from the Beiji oil refinery during clashes between the Islamic State and Iraqi government forces in Beiji, northern Iraq, on July 30. The militants tried to take the refinery this summer, but government forces have held on.
STR EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 25, 2014 12:43 pm

Editor's Note: This story was published on Sept. 9. In light of the U.S.-led airstrikes on the Islamic State's oil production facilities, we wanted to showcase it once again.

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National Security
5:25 am
Wed September 3, 2014

Islamist Militants Use Beheading Video To Push Its Agenda

Originally published on Wed September 3, 2014 7:22 am

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Don Gonyea.

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And I'm David Greene. A video showing the beheading of a second American journalist has now been verified. That's according to the White House.

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Middle East
5:48 am
Mon August 25, 2014

U.S. Weighs Its Option Dealing With Islamist Militants

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 10:53 am

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Parallels
6:39 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Syrian Babies Born To Refugees Face A Future In Limbo

Ayaman with his wife, Selma, and their 1-month-old daughter, Shana, who was born in Turkey. Syrian refugee parents who give birth in Turkey are finding it difficult to register their newborns, and many are stateless.
Jodi Hilton for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 1:05 pm

Thousands of Syrian infants born to refugee parents are now stateless. Their births are unregistered and will pose many difficult challenges in this long-term conflict.

The exact numbers are far from certain. A recent report by the United Nations refugee agency, UNHCR, suggests that 75 percent of Syrians born in Lebanon since 2011 have not been properly registered. Many families don't have any identification documents, which were destroyed in the fighting or left behind in a panicked escape.

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Parallels
2:06 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Syria's Army On The Verge Of Retaking The Country's Largest City

A Syrian man carries a girl on a street covered with dust following a government airstrike in Aleppo on Tuesday. Rebels took the eastern half of the city in 2012 but are now in danger of being forced out by President Bashar Assad's troops.
Baraa Al-Halabi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 12:00 pm

When Syria's rebels were on the offensive in 2012, they captured the eastern half of Aleppo and the surrounding countryside. But now President Bashar Assad's troops are poised to retake all of the city that is the largest in Syria and served as the prewar financial capital.

A new military campaign is heating up as Assad, who assumed power when his father, Hafez Assad, died in 2000, was sworn in Wednesday for his third term as president. A rebel defeat could be a crushing blow to what is left of the country's three-year rebellion against the Syrian regime.

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