KGOU

Dick Pryor

KGOU General Manager

Dick Pryor brings decades of experience in public television, having previously served as deputy director, managing editor, and news manager for OETA, Oklahoma’s statewide public TV network.

A native of Norman, Pryor earned a B.A. in Journalism and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma.  In 2015, he was chosen a Distinguished Alumnus of the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Oklahoma, where he is an adjunct instructor of Mass Communication Law. Pryor was inducted into the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame in 2009.

In addition to newsroom and station leadership, Pryor has served as news and sports anchor and reporter, talk show host, play-by-play announcer, public relations director for Oklahoma City’s professional baseball team and chief of staff for the lieutenant governor.  He has provided employment law and business coaching to corporate executives, managers and human resource professionals.

Thoughts on public media's future.

Ways to Connect

KGOU is...

Mar 24, 2017

I’m KGOU General Manager Dick Pryor.

KGOU’s Spring pledge drive begins April first.

Over the past few weeks you’ve heard us say KGOU is “Powered by People.”

Well, it’s true.

We are listener supported, and those dollars allow KGOU to be an independent, reliable source of news and information.

Public service media is needed now, more than ever, and so is your support.

National Severe Storms Laboratory / NOAA

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Most of us have to work hard to pay the bills, watch how much we spend and try to set aside some dollars in case of emergency.

In these days of tightening budgets, KGOU is also just one unexpected event away from being in a financial bind.

Severe storms, power outages, equipment failures, changes in regulations or cuts in funding can force KGOU to dip into precious financial reserves.

The margin is shrinking, even as we grow our impact and service to the people of Oklahoma.

Oklahoma prosecutors have filed child prostitution charges against state Sen. Ralph Shortey, R-Oklahoma City, after police found him in a hotel room with a 17-year-old boy.
Cleveland County Sheriff's Office via AP

 

Leaders in the Oklahoma senate wasted little time to strip state Sen. Ralph Shortey of most of his privileges last Wednesday when allegations emerged that the Oklahoma City Republican had allegedly offered money for sex with a teenage boy.

“Abruptly, late Wednesday morning, the Senate took a recess and the Senate Republicans began caucusing behind closed doors,” eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley told KGOU during his weekly Capitol Insider interview.

KGOU / OU Outreach

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Hard to believe, but KGOU has been in its “new” studios for ten years. We’re glad to be located on the University of Oklahoma’s Norman campus, but after ten years, the equipment we bought when we moved in, is showing its age.

Electronic equipment just wears out over time. The Oklahoma City transmitter needs a new tube, and the whole thing will need to be replaced before long. After ten years, our main audio console and on-air automation computers are becoming less reliable and need maintenance more often.

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

 

 

The Oklahoma legislature faces an approximately $880 million budget shortfall, and proposals to increase revenue have not gained traction. Meanwhile, the House passed a bill this week that would incrementally increase teacher pay.

This is the NPR logo
NPR

This is the Manager’s Minute.

KGOU, Your NPR Source.

If you’re an avid listener, you’ve heard us say that many times.

But, it’s more than a slogan. It signals our commitment to trusted news and information, and the “Dialogue of Democracy.”

That’s what public service media is all about.

The ratings, across the nation, prove the value of NPR.

In 2016, ratings for the flagship programs, Morning Edition and All Things Considered, increased 25 to 43 percent in the 25 to 54 year old age group.

 

Oklahomans will have the option to get new identification cards in compliance with the federal government’s REAL ID Act. Also this week, a major rating agency decreased the state’s credit rate, which could make the capitol restoration more expensive.

Governor Mary Fallin signed the REAL ID Act into effect on Thursday to make Oklahoma state licenses comply with federal minimum safety standards of identification.

The Department of Public Safety must now find a provider to issue the IDs.

page from calendar
studio curve / Flickr

This is the Manager’s Minute.

There’s been a lot of talk recently about the media and how we serve the public.

Sure, the mission of KGOU, and NPR, involves delivering important news, information and meaningful discussion.

But, we also build community.

We connect people from different places, backgrounds and beliefs.

And, we provide a marketplace for ideas and shared experiences.

One of the ways KGOU does that is through our Community Events Calendar.

This is the Manager’s Minute.

We recently completed KGOU’s internal audit for fiscal year 2016.

Business manager Cindy Cottrell did a great job crunching the numbers and working with the new independent accounting firm.

For the year, total operating revenue increased 1.3 percent over 2015.

The big reason for the increase was that giving from private sources – individuals and businesses – rose by six percent.

In fact, donations from individuals just missed KGOU’s all-time high for a single year.

So, thanks for your support.

interior view of Oklahoma Capitol rotunda and dome
Dick Pryor

This is the Manager’s Minute.

As the Oklahoma legislature begins its 2017 session, this is a good time to remember the important role news organizations serve as a watchdog over state, local and national government.

KGOU will be covering the legislative session, and each week we’ll discuss the big stories in Capitol Insider.

Our nation’s founders recognized a vibrant press is critical in holding government accountable to the people.

We’re supposed to ask probing questions and connect the dots.

Gov. Mary Fallin during her 2015 State of the State address Feb. 2, 2015.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

 

As Governor Mary Fallin prepares for her State of the State address on Monday, February 6th, the Oklahoma legislature looks at changes involving taxes, criminal justice and disciplining some of their own.

At the Associated Press Legislative Forum on Thursday, Gov. Fallin said she wants to see, “a major overhaul of our tax system.”

This is the Manager’s Minute. With the new semester beginning, KGOU is welcoming several students from the University of Oklahoma.

Amber Friend is a senior Print Journalism major at the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication – and she’s taking Radio News.

Macee Beheler is a senior, majoring in broadcast journalism. Through her Practicum class, Macee will be producing KGOU’s new weekly feature, Capitol Insider.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

 

The Oklahoma legislature will consider bills covering a wide range of topics in its upcoming session.

eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley told KGOU’s Dick Pryor that lawmakers will tackle issues including handguns, abortion and how to fix the state’s estimated $900 million budget shortfall.

“Really every aspect of state law, state government is touched by the bills that were filed this year,” said Shawn Ashley.

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Presidential Inauguration Day is Friday, January 20.

KGOU and NPR plan special coverage beginning at 9 a.m. as Donald Trump becomes the 45th president of the United States.

NPR’s Steve Inskeep and Audie Cornish will co-host from the Capitol and National Mall, with live reports, interviews, speeches and the oath of office.

At 1 p.m., inauguration coverage continues with Here & Now hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson reporting on the Inaugural Luncheon and Parade.

man writing on steno pad
Alex Steffler / Flickr

Happy new year, everyone.

This is the Manager’s Minute.

2016 was quite a year, and the election cycle caused a lot of us in the media to step back and reflect on what we do, how we do it, and why our work is so important.

KGOU, NPR and StateImpact Oklahoma are committed to providing impactful trusted journalism you can count on every day to be well-informed.

We take seriously our obligation to deliver reliable news and information that is critical to civic engagement and a functioning society.

Three people with recording equipment around a table.
World Views

This is the Manager’s Minute.

As we turn the calendar to a new year, changes are coming to KGOU’s on-air voices.

After nearly 40 years on the air, Diane Rehm has retired, and beginning January second, you’ll hear Joshua Johnson and his new program, 1A, weekday mornings at 9:00.

And, January fourth is the final day at KGOU for Morning Edition host Brian Hardzinski.

Brian has spent almost eleven years at KGOU.

Creative Commons Birthday Cake and Candles
D Sharon Pruitt / CC BY 2.0

This is the Manager’s Minute.

The holidays are a time to celebrate hope, peace and joy.

At KGOU, we’re celebrating 34 years of service to Oklahoma as an NPR affiliate, as our number of loyal listeners keeps growing.

Nationally, NPR programs have shown about a 40 percent increase in ratings over the past twelve months.

That tells us you appreciate the trusted news and information and enriching programs we deliver every day.

And, we appreciate the financial support KGOU receives from you, our valued listeners, and friends.

calendar page for December 2016
KGOU

This is the Manager’s Minute.

With the holidays rapidly approaching, many of us are planning special activities with friends and family, and checking items off our end-of-year to-do lists. As you wind down 2016, please consider a gift to KGOU.

If you are already a supporter – thanks for your financial commitment to KGOU and public service media. We hope you might even be able to increase your support to help us upgrade and grow.

two photo portraits side by side
for KGOU

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Now that the calendar has turned to December, and the fall semester is ending at the University of Oklahoma, we want to thank the OU students working at KGOU.

Storme Jones is host of the noon news, traffic and weather reports and produces special features.

Richard Bassett handles the community event calendars, online and on the air, and does audio engineering for local musical performances.

Both are paid student staff members, and we’re glad they will be with us over the holidays and during the spring semester in 2017.

Joshua Johnson, smiling with arms crossed
Stephen Voss

This is the Manager’s Minute. The election is over, the leaves are turning and the holidays are upon us. November is a month of transition, and so it is this year at KGOU.

We just completed a successful partnership with the League of Women Voters, KOSU, OETA, Tyler Media, Oklahoma Watch, the Oklahoman and the Kirkpatrick Foundation to provide the Oklahoma Engaged election guide.

We say so long to Kate Carlton Greer as she begins a new position at the state Capitol. And we wish Karen Holp the best after 28 years at KGOU.

Pages