Hallie Arias

Digital Content Intern, World Views

Hallie Arias is a senior at the University of Oklahoma. She is pursuing degrees in international relations, Spanish, photojournalism, and social justice. A life-long fan of NPR and public radio, Hallie is thrilled to be interning with KGOU this summer.

In her free time, Hallie enjoys traveling, watching British television, and ballroom dancing.

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World Views
2:00 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

OU Graduate Sees Continued Instability In Afghanistan's Future

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Jon Lyman hands a piece of candy to an Afghan child during a security patrol on November 30, 2011.
Credit Reece Lodder / United States Marine Corps

Listen to Dana Mohammed-Zadeh's conversation with Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis.

Afghanistan’s Interior Ministry announced on Monday that insurgents had killed nearly 300 local and national police last month, as well as 180 civilians. A day later, militants detonated a suicide car bomb at the gate of a NATO compound in Kabul killing five guards and two civilians.

Dana Mohammad-Zadeh says knowing attacks like these will happen is part of life in Afghanistan’s capital city. She earned a degree in Economics and International Studies from the University of Oklahoma in 2012, and now works in the development sector in Kabul.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

World Views: June 28, 2013

Listen to the entire June 28,2013 episode.

Joshua Landis offers an update about the situation in Syria, and how chemical weapons affect the public’s view of the civil war. The panel also talks about the Edward Snowden case and the complexities of asylum and extradition.

Stigler, Oklahoma native Pamela Olson moved to Palestine  after she graduated in 2002. She settled in Ramallah, where she worked as the head writer and editor for the Palestine MonitorShe just wrote a book about her experiences called Fast Times in Palestine.

World Views
3:30 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Oklahoma’s Pamela Olson Describes The Hidden Realities Of Life In The Palestinian Territories

Author Pamela Olson
Credit Provided

Listen to Pamela Olson's conversation with Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis.

When Pamela Olson traveled to the occupied West Bank on a whim in 2003, she only expected to stay for a week. She stayed for two years, though, and served as head writer and editor for the Palestine Monitor and as foreign press coordinator for Mustafa Barghouthi's 2005 presidential campaign – unlikely posts for a self-described “physics major, ex-bartender, volunteer from Oklahoma.”

“Of course I was intimidated,” Olson says. “I was worried because this was the first conflict zone I had ever been in, but just immediately I was made to feel so welcome.”

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

World Views: June 21, 2013

Listen to the entire June 21, 2013 episode.

Rebecca Cruise returns and guest-hosts while Suzette Grillot joins the program from Italy to talk about protests sweeping Brazil's largest cities, and the implications of the newly-elected moderate president for the future of a nuclear Iran.

University of California, Berkeley historian Daniel Sargent argues the 1970s were a pivotal decade on the global stage. He calls U.S. foreign policy immediately after the Cold War “uninspiring.”

World Views
5:18 pm
Wed June 19, 2013

How The 1970s Changed The Role Of Human Rights In U.S. Foreign Policy

Jimmy Carter hosts a ceremony commemorating the 30th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 6 December 1978
Credit White House Staff Photographer / National Archives and Records Administration

This audio is pending

University of California, Berkeley historian Daniel Sargent says the 1970s were a turning point for American foreign policy.

“Prior to the '70s, the U.S. was very actively engaged in working to promote development and modernization within foreign countries in the developing world,” Sargent says. “And these efforts proved largely unsuccessful.”

Sargent says President Carter was the first, and last, president to make human rights a central policy issue. After Carter, the United States took a step back from actively promoting development and focused on maintaining an open system of international trade.

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World Views
12:44 pm
Fri June 14, 2013

World Views: June 14, 2013

Listen to the entire June 14, 2013 episode.

Over the past 11 months, the Zaatari refugee camp in Northern Jordan has hosted hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees fleeing that country’s civil war.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise visited the camp in early June, and witnessed some of the newest arrivals.

Real-time updates on social media are revolutionizing traditional journalism. By following Twitter feeds and other forms of social media, journalists like NPR Senior Strategist Andy Carvin now identify breaking news faster and do a better job following international stories.

World Views
3:28 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

How Crowdsourcing Changes The Nature Of News Coverage

Libyan rebels play on the body of a plane destroyed during heavy fighting at Tripoli International Airport on August 29, 2011.
Credit Ammar Abd Rabbo / Flickr

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with NPR's Andy Carvin.

Real-time updates on social media are revolutionizing traditional journalism. By following Twitter feeds and other forms of social media, journalists like NPR Senior Strategist Andy Carvin now identify breaking news faster and do a better job following international stories.

“Crowdsourcing is basically just a fancy term for asking for help from the public,” Carvin says. “It's something journalists have always done at various points, but now social media has made it easy to engage people all over the world.”

Carvin calls himself an “informational DJ.” He has used crowdsourcing to cover stories ranging from the Newtown, Connecticut shooting to the Arab Spring.

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World Views
4:59 pm
Fri June 7, 2013

World Views: June 7, 2013

Listen to the entire June 7, 2013 episode.

Suzette Grillot continues to host the program from Istanbul. A week since protests broke out across Turkey, she and Joshua Landis discuss where things stand in the normally peaceful and stable country.

On Friday June 14 Iranians head to the polls to elect a successor to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The Tehran Bureau founder and editor Kelly Niknejadjoins World Views for a look at the elections, and a conversation about Western journalism in the Islamic Republic.

World Views
11:45 am
Thu June 6, 2013

How The Internet Is Changing Coverage Of Iran

A demonstrator holds a sign in Tehran on June 16, 2009.
Credit Milad Avazbeigi / Wikimedia Commons

Listen Kelly Niknejad's conversation with Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis.

Kelly Niknejad founded Tehran Bureau in 2008 to provide a platform for independent reporting from Iran. The Bureau, a virtual hub connecting journalists, experts, and the public, is revolutionary.

“You're not just dependent on one [government] minder who is then reporting back to the Ministry of Cultural and Islamic Guidance,” Niknejad says. “You're in touch with people who are in different neighborhoods, who have different backgrounds, who are in different cities. You get to see what part of what they say overlaps, what doesn't, and why doesn't it overlap -- is it because it’s wrong or is it because the reality is different in this neighborhood or this city?”

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

World Views: May 31, 2013

Listen to the entire May 31, 2013 episode

Suzette Grillot reports from Antalya, Turkey, where she speaks with Middle East expert Joshua Landis about Turkey’s booming economy and domestic anxieties.

Desmond Shawe-Taylor and Anna Somers Cocks join the program to discuss art appreciation in the 21st century. Shawe-Taylor is the Surveyor of The Queen’s Pictures, overseeing nearly 7,000 oil paintings and 3,000 miniatures from the British Royal Collection. Somers Cocks is the founding editor and CEO of The Art Newspaper.

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