KGOU

Jacob McCleland

KGOU News Director

Jacob joined the KGOU News department in March 2015; previously he spent nine years as a reporter and host at public radio station KRCU in Cape Girardeau, Mo. His stories have appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Here & Now, Harvest Public Media and PRI’s The World. Jacob has reported on floods, disappearing languages, crop duster pilots, anvil shooters, Manuel Noriega, mule jumps and more.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and Spanish from Southeast Missouri State University and a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Jacob warns us he won't answer the phone when the St. Louis Cardinals are playing a postseason game. Fun fact: his high school mascot is the Appleknocker.

Ways to Connect

In this May 16, 2013 file photo, Chinese demonstrators hold banners as they participate in a protest against a planned refinery project in downtown Kunming, in southwestern China's Yunnan province.
Aritz Parra / AP

China’s environmental movement is one of the few areas in which Chinese citizens can generally speak their mind, according to documentary filmmaker and journalist Gary Marcuse.

Marcuse, whose documentary Waking the Green Tiger explores the demonstrations that blocked a dam project in the Tiger Leaping Gorge, says there are between 50,000 and 100,000 environmental demonstrations every year in China. Many citizens protest the country’s high levels of smog and other environmental issues.

From Alaska, Rebecca Cruise discusses how Alaskans are reacting to the testing of North Korean missiles that could potentially reach that state. From Jerusalem, Suzette Grillot talks about Friday's attack that killed two Israeli police officers at the Western Wall.

Then Suzette talks with filmmaker Gary Marcuse about his film Waking the Green Tiger and the environmental movement in China.

A woman pulls a suitcase along NE 23rd Street near N. Spencer Road in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma City residents’ life expectancies vary greatly across the city. Among all ZIP codes, the difference between the highest life expectancy and the lowest is 18 years.

According to the Oklahoma City-County Health Department’s new wellness report, residents in the  73131 ZIP code have a life expectancy of 82 years, while their neighbors in the next door 73141 ZIP code live for an average of less than 68 years - a similar expectancy as developing countries such as Cambodia and Iraq.

Oklahoma City Thunder guard Raymond Felton, left, smiles as forward Patrick Patterson, right, answers a question during a news conference to introduce the players in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, July 11, 2017.
AP / Sue Ogrocki

The Oklahoma City Thunder introduced two of their newest players to the media Tuesday.

The team signed free agents Patrick Patterson and Raymond Felton during the offseason.

Felton is a 12-year veteran of the NBA who will primarily serve as Russell Westbrook’s backup point guard. He says he signed with Oklahoma City because he wants to compete for a championship.

World Views: July 7, 2017

Jul 7, 2017

Joshua Landis talks with historian Salim Yaqub about the factors that create instability in the Middle East, and why the Israeli-Palestinian peace process has stalled.

Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, U.S. President Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat at the Oslo Accords signing ceremony on September 13, 1993.
Wikimedia Commons

Historian Salim Yaqub says instability in the Middle East can be traced back to economic stagnation, authoritarian leaders, widespread frustration among the people, and a long history of Western intervention.

A couple rides a water scooter on Lake Thunderbird east of Norman.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

An internal audit at the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department found fraudulent employee time cards, misappropriation of funds and failure to comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the French trial of Equatorial Guinea's vice president, and India Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to the White House.

Then, Suzette talks with SOIL director of strategy Nick Preneta about his organization's work in Haiti to turn human waste into fertilizer.

SOIL

Sanitation and waste treatment is underdeveloped in Haiti, a nation that has suffered massive earthquakes and hurricanes, a cholera epidemic and ineffective governance. Now, non-profit organizations like Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods, or SOIL, are collaborating with the Haitian government to help improve waste treatment and sanitation.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the Trump administration's changes to Cuba policy, and the ongoing conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Then, Suzette talks with Mateo Farzaneh about the role of Iranian women in the Iran-Iraq War. Farzaneh's forthcoming book is Iranian Women and Gender in the Iran-Iraq War.

Islamwomen.net

Mateo Farzaneh was recently visiting the Iranian city of Khorramshahr, a border city that put up a battle against Iraqi forces in 1980 during the Iran-Iraq War. The city fended off troops for 34 days before the Iraqis finally occupied it. Inside a mosque that is famous for its resistance to the foreign occupation, Farzaneh noticed an oversight.

“I walked in and I saw a ton of portraits of men as being the martyrs and people that sacrifice everything. But there was not a single photograph of women,” Farzaneh told KGOU’s World Views.

A man walks past the old city jail property in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

The old Oklahoma City jail could be put to a new use.

Rebecca Cruise talks with Paul Worley from Western Carolina University about the first indigenous woman to run for president of Mexico.

Then, Suzette Grillot interviews Ted Henken about entrepreneurs in Cuba.

A private entrepreneur who sells house and kitchen supplies waits for customers at his home in Havana, Cuba, Tuesday, May 24, 2016.
Desmond Boylan / AP

Ted Henken was visiting the Cuban beach resort of Varadero, looking for a place to stay. He asked a waiter if for accommodation suggestions. During the waiter’s smoke break, he took Henken to five bed and breakfasts within 15 minutes.

Workers on a road construction project on E.K. Gaylord Boulevard in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Education proponents and other Oklahoma City residents spoke out against a MAPS sales tax and bond proposal at this week’s city council meeting. If approved by council on June 20, the public will vote on the $1.1 billion proposal in September.

The general obligation bond package, permanent quarter-cent sales tax and temporary three-quarters cent sales tax would be used for infrastructure improvements and emergency services. The sales taxes would be a continuation of the expiring MAPS 3 one percent sales tax.

Researchers fly a copter drone near Enid, Oklahoma on May 16, 2017
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, could help scientists forecast where and when thunderstorms develop, before storm even occur. Experiments are ongoing, and optimism is high.

Law enforcement has captured all four inmates who escaped from the Lincoln County Jail early Monday morning. United States Marshals apprehended the final escapee, 23-year-old Brian Allen Moody, in Lincoln County on Thursday.

The other three inmates, 41-year-old Sonny Baker, 31-year-old Jeremy Tyson Irvin and 27-year-old Trey Goodnight were captured on Wednesday morning.

This post was updated on June 15, 2017 at 4:40 p.m.

Original post:

Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis talks about the diplomatic falling out between Qatar its neighbors, and the recent terrorist attack in Iran.

And Suzette Grillot speaks with Laura Murray-Kolb about the effects of iron deficiency on children and mothers.

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about Taiwan's same-sex marriage ruling. They also discuss Turkey's cancelation of Oklahoma City Thunder player Enes Kanter's passport, and what it means to be stateless.  Then, Suzette interviews Michael Georgieff, a professor pediatrics and child psychology at the University of Minnesota. Much of his work focuses on iron deficiency in the brains of young children. 

In this Feb. 10, 2017 photo, nurses take care of a newborn baby in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai government is distributing prenatal vitamins containing folic acid and iron to women between the ages of 20-34.
Sakchai Lalit / AP

Research into micronutrients is beginning to show how deficiencies can impact neuropsychological functioning through the life of a patient.

Historically, studies of a shortage of macronutrients, like protein, have shown an association with a lack of cognitive ability. However, until relatively recently, there was little research into how micronutrient deficiencies impact the brain, according to Laura Murray-Kolb, a nutritional scientist at Penn State University.

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