KGOU

Jacob McCleland

KGOU News Director

Jacob joined the KGOU News department in March 2015; previously he spent nine years as a reporter and host at public radio station KRCU in Cape Girardeau, Mo. His stories have appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Here & Now, Harvest Public Media and PRI’s The World. Jacob has reported on floods, disappearing languages, crop duster pilots, anvil shooters, Manuel Noriega, mule jumps and more.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and Spanish from Southeast Missouri State University and a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Jacob warns us he won't answer the phone when the St. Louis Cardinals are playing a postseason game. Fun fact: his high school mascot is the Appleknocker.

Ways to Connect

U.S. Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) speaking during a July 28, 2015 Students for Life rally at the U.S. Capitol.
Provided / U.S. Sen. James Lankford

Updated July 30, 12:01 p.m.

Republican U.S. Senators discussed legislation Wednesday that would block federal money from going to Planned Parenthood and send those funds to other organizations that provide healthcare services for women.

Planned Parenthood is under scrutiny after videos surfaced that allegedly show doctors talking about selling fetal tissues. The organization’s leadership says Planned Parenthood does not profit from fetal tissue donations. 

Ryan LaCroix / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The Oklahoma Supreme Court Monday reaffirmed its decision that a Ten Commandments monument must be removed from the capitol grounds. The high court denied Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s request for a rehearing.

The state supreme court justices found nothing of merit to rehear the case. They ruled on June 30 that the monument was in violation of the state constitution’s ban on using public money for religious purposes. 

American Civil Liberties Union legal director Brady Henderson says he expected the court’s decision to reaffirm.

Robert Bever
Tulsa County Jail

Updated July 26, 2015

Few details are known about the two brothers who killed their parents and three siblings in their Broken Arrow, Oklahoma home this past week.

The Tulsa World reports that neighbors describe them as a family that keeps to themselves, and the children were rarely seen outside the house.

President Barack Obama talks with attendees of a speech in Durant, Oklahoma on July 15, 2015.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Millions of American students don’t have access to high speed internet at home, putting them at an educational disadvantage. On Wednesday, president Barack Obama began his two-day visit to Oklahoma by unveiling a new plan to bring  internet service into low income households.

The president was met with applause and introduced himself with the Choctaw greeting “Halito” at Durant High School in the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma.

President Obama speaking to supporters in a pipe yard in Cushing, Okla. in 2012, where the Keystone XL Pipeline connects on its way from Canada to the Gulf Coast.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

President Obama travels to Oklahoma Wednesday where he will announce a new initiative to expand broadband access to homes in low-income areas.

The president will make the announcement at Durant High School in the capital of the Choctaw Nation in southeastern Oklahoma.

Obama’s ConnectHome initiative will expand broadband coverage to 275,000 low income households in 27 cities and the Choctaw Nation. The White House estimates it’ll bring broadband into the homes of nearly 200,000 low income children.

Supreme Court
Mark Fischer / Flickr

The end of June was a busy few days for both the state and federal judiciary. As the U.S. Supreme Court wound down its term, opinions in some of the widest-reaching cases came in the final few days.

But a lot of the reasons behind all of this began years ago.

Death Penalty Dispute

purple heart medal in a case
Lance Cpl. Jeffrey A. Cosola / United States Marine Corps

U.S. Rep. Steve Russell has inserted language into the National Defense Authorization Act that would award the Purple Heart to six service members who were killed in the Oklahoma City bombing.

The two soldiers, two airmen and two Marines were working as recruiters in the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on April 19, 1995.

Math teacher Sherry Read's classroom is a total mess. The students are gone for the summer, and light fixtures dangle from the ceiling. The floor has a layer of dust. Down the hallway, workers make a racket while they renovate the school, which dates back to the 1890s. They're working in what has become an archaeological site.

The National Weather Service says another 4 to 5 inches of rain could fall today on areas still recovering from Memorial Day weekend floods that left 14 dead and two missing along the Blanco River in Texas.

Forecasters have issued a flash flood warning for seven counties in southeastern Texas as a Tropical Depression Bill makes its way inland. As the storm heads north, it could drop up to 9 inches of rain on parts of Oklahoma, a state still waterlogged from record-setting rainfall in May.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Oklahoma’s Libertarian and Green parties announced Monday they will launch a joint signature campaign to get both of their parties recognized for the 2016 election – with a goal of making it easier for voters to choose the parties’ nominees.

The Interstate 35 bridge over the Red River an the Oklahoma-Texas state line at 7 a.m. Friday.
Chris Jones / Facebook

Updated 1:54 p.m.: The National Weather Service says the Washita River in western and southern Oklahoma, and the Red River along the Texas border, experienced record flooding overnight. It's likely to continue through the weekend.

At 2:30 a.m., the Red River at Gainesville, Texas set a new record by reaching 40.16 feet, beating a 28-year-old record. It passed 41 feet by 5:30 a.m., and was expected to crest Friday afternoon. The major flood stage conditions will likely continue through Sunday morning.

National Archives And Records Administration

Jim Thorpe. One of the greatest athletes of the 20th century – if not the greatest. After winning two gold medals at the 1912 Olympics, Sweden’s King Gustav V reportedly told him, “You, sir, are the greatest athlete in the world.”

Thorpe’s response? “Thanks.”

Contractors discovered chalk drawings and lessons on blackboards in Emerson High School, dating to 1917.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

A construction crew working on a school in Oklahoma City made a startling discovery earlier this month. Behind the walls at Emerson High School, they found old chalkboards containing class lessons, written in chalk almost a century ago. And chalk drawings, in remarkable condition.

Math teacher Sherry Read’s classroom is a total mess. Light fixtures dangle from the ceiling. The floor has a layer of dust. Down the hallway, workers make a racket in another classroom.

Pixabay

Oklahoma City's police chief says new guidelines outlining the types of video footage open for public records will pave the way for the use of body cameras in Oklahoma's largest city.

The new law permits the release of body camera videos but allows certain exemptions. Videos containing death are exempt from release, unless the death was caused by law enforcement.

Oklahoma State Capitol
mrlaugh / Flickr

The 55th Oklahoma Legislature wrapped up its first session a little over two weeks ago on May 22, one week ahead of the constitutionally required deadline to adjourn.

Lawmakers passed bond issues for widely publicized museums in both Oklahoma City and Tulsa. But the $611 million shortfall in the state budget dominated the conversation from January to May, even though details of the $7.1 billion agreement didn't emerge until shortly before the gavel fell. To plug that gap, lawmakers cut most agency budgets by five to seven percent, and also used monies from the state's Rainy Day Fund and state agency revolving accounts.

Despite flooding and erosion on the South Canadian River, Toby Bogart hopes to rebuild his farm on the outskirts of Oklahoma City.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Toby Bogart looks out over the South Canadian River from his farm near Oklahoma City. Normally, it’s a quiet river, a good spot for fishing. But after May’s torrential rain, the river is sprawling and wild, and it’s forging a new path right through Bogart’s farm.

“The river is supposed to be 200 yards, the bed is 200 yards over there,” Bogart said. “It’s got to stop because we’re right here where there’s nothing to block it now. If we get enough rain, it’s just going to gladly eat more and just eat it up as we go.”

Sandra Massey at a press conference in Oklahoma City on June 3, 2015.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Members of the Sac and Fox tribe announced a campaign to bring the remains of athlete Jim Thorpe back to his home state of Oklahoma on Wednesday.

Thorpe was buried in 1953 in Pennsylvania after his widow reached a deal with a pair of boroughs to place his remains in a mausoleum there. The two Pennsylvania towns consolidated and renamed themselves Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania.

30-day rainfall totals from Oklahoma Mesonet stations as of May 31, 2015.
Oklahoma Mesonet

No surprise here - May went down as the wettest month in Oklahoma history.

The final statewide average rainfall for May was 14.4 inches. State climatologist Gary McManus said that's nearly 9.6 inches above normal, and obliterated the 74-year-old previous record of 10.75 inches set in October 1941. The Oklahoma Climatological Survey has kept records since the 1890s.

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin and Oklahoma Emergency Management director Albert Ashwood meet with first responders in Purcell on May 27, 2015.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Clean-up continues across Texas and Oklahoma after days of heavy rain and flooding. In Oklahoma, May is already the wettest month on record and the rains aren’t done yet. More water means more flooding in a state where the soil is already saturated and rivers are overflowing.

Justin Nimmo walks up the muddy front steps of his rent-to-own store in Purcell, Oklahoma, a little town about 40 miles south of Oklahoma City. Inside, fans and dehumidifiers purr as they strain to dry out his showroom.

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