KGOU

Jim Johnson

KGOU Program Manager / Host of The Weekend Blues

Jim is a journalism/mass communications graduate from the University of Oklahoma. While still a student, he became the host of what is now The Weekend Blues. He currently serves as KGOU’s Program Director where he supervises all aspects of KGOU’s on-air programming output. 

Jim serves as Program Chair for Jazz in June, Norman’s annual Jazz and Blues festival. He also enjoys singing and playing in a Blues/Rock band (guitar) in various venues around the metro.

Ways to Connect

Oklahoma has one of the largest Native American populations in the United States. By using their right to govern themselves, some of Oklahoma’s tribes have become economic powerhouses, contributing hugely to the state economy. But some tribes are faring much better than others. Which tribes are doing well? Has the political influence of Native Americans – and the treatment of their culture – changed in line with growing economic success? And, are there valuable lessons to be learned from Oklahoma for indigenous peoples in the rest of the United States and around the world?

robot arm holding human skull
IQ2US/PRX

As technology rapidly progresses, some proponents of artificial intelligence believe that it will help solve complex social challenges and offer immortality via virtual humans. But AI’s critics say that we should proceed with caution, that any rewards may be overpromised, and the pursuit of 'super' intelligence and autonomous machines may result in unintended consequences.

 

Jazz legend Dave Brubeck battled time and place throughout his life.

His 1959 album Time Out broke new ground by featuring all original works, polytonality and unusual time signatures. It also produced one of the most recognizable songs in jazz, “Take Five.” But another album standout hints even more at classical music’s pull on the artist.

The Fifth Beatle: A George Martin Appreciation
Paul Ingles/PRX.org

To say that Sir George Henry Martin was an acclaimed record producer, arranger, composer and audio engineer would be an incomplete summary of his skills. After all, Martin was the “Fifth Beatle.” It was George Martin who helped to transform the lads from Liverpool into the biggest musical act of their time.

Gillian Blease, Getty Images / Intelligence Squared U.S.

Student-involved protests seem to be erupting at increasing rates on university campuses across the country. To many, these students are speaking out against various injustices that have long been manifested in "unwelcoming", sometimes "hostile" environments. But to critics, many of these students have gone too far, creating an atmosphere of intolerance for opposing or unpopular points of view.  Are the protestors silencing free speech, or are they just trying to be heard?

Intelligence Squared U.S. "Lifespans Are Long Enough"
Intelligence Squared U.S.

What if we didn’t have to grow old and die? The average American can expect to live for 78.8 years, an improvement over the days before clean water and vaccines, but it's still not long enough for most of us. So researchers around the world have been working on arresting the process of aging through biotechnology.

Author of Fire In Beulah, Rilla Askew
Provided

One of the country’s worst acts of violence against a minority community happened in Oklahoma. The 1921 Tulsa Race Riot led to the destruction of Greenwood, a wealthy all-black area due north of downtown known as “Black Wall Street.”

For years, history books glossed over accounts of the event. In 1996, state lawmakers commissioned an official historical account of what happened. Seven years earlier, award-winning novelist Rilla Askew began researching the Tulsa Race Riot for a book after realizing she had never heard of the historic event.

Jose Antonio Vargas with Race Matters host Merleyn Bell and World Literature Today's R.C. Davis.
KGOU

Swaths of Syrians have been displaced by the country’s five-year civil war. Even though only a tiny fraction of the estimated 4 million refugees fleeing the conflict have ended up in the United States, it’s added a new dimension to conversations about border security, terrorism, and undocumented immigrants’ effect on the U.S. economy.

University of Oklahoma Assistant Professor and political scientist Mackenzie Israel-Trummel
Provided

Just weeks before voters caucus in Iowa and head to the polls in New Hampshire, who will become the two major parties’ standard-bearers and win the nominations is still anyone’s guess. But race and ethnic identity will likely play a much larger role on the Republican side of the aisle – the field is more crowded, there are several minority candidates, and immigration has become a key campaign issue along both the U.S.

University of Oklahoma Native American Studies Associate Professor Heather Shotton
National Indian Education Association

Blowback against the long-standing use of Native American mascots highlights issues of identity and cultural appropriation. Supporters of using Native American symbols, names, and images for sports teams and schools say it honors tribal culture, but many Native Americans say it shows disrespect stemming from a lack of understanding toward indigenous peoples.

KGOU staff

The civil rights movement of the 1960s brought forward concerns about voting rights, segregation, and proportional representation.  While the focus of similar racial protest has most recently shifted to aggressive policing and apparent inequities within the criminal justice system, University of Oklahoma educator and author George Henderson considers the current Black Lives Matter movement an extension of what he witnessed during the 1960s - with similar aims of ensuring  justice for African-Americans.

National Weather Service

The National Weather Service forecasts a variety of dangerous weather conditions across Oklahoma into Monday.

Intelligence Squared U.S.

Today, a national debate rages about the functioning of our criminal justice system. Is it fair? Does it serve the ends of justice and public safety? Does it apply equally to all? Prosecutors, endowed with both autonomy and immunity, hold immense power within this system. They control secret grand jury proceedings, who will be prosecuted, and the specifics of charges.

(Left-to-right) Benjamin Von Gutzeit, Mateusz Smoczynski, Mark Summer, & David Balakrishnan of the Turtle Island Quartet
Bill Reitzel / turtleislandquartet.com

The traditional string quartet has staying power. Austrian composer Joseph Haydn legitimized the combination of viola, cello and two violins during the mid-1700s, and it’s still one of the most prominent chamber ensembles in music. It’s an old format, but one that’s becoming more flexible.

“The Turtle Island Quartet was expressly formed to get us string players off the page, so to speak,” says David Balakrishnan. “That’s the easy way to say (it).”

Ken Rudin's "Election 2016: One Year Out"
Ken Rudin/PRX

Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin as he offers a broad examination of the 2016 presidential election in an hour-long "Political Junkie" special. 

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