Kate Carlton Greer

KGOU News Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Oklahoma City
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Updated 12:05 p.m. Gov. Jeb Bush calls for increased homeland security

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush opened his speech talking about family and “love at first sight.” The crowd cheered loudly when he mentioned how proud he was of his brother and his parents. 

Bush spent a bulk of his time discussing the economy, saying the county needed to reevaluate what it was doing.

“We can’t have a government we can’t afford and allow it to grow,” Bush said, highlighting his veto history while he was the governor.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Oklahoma City
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Updated 2:58 p.m. U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum Promotes His Foreign Policy Expertise

U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum touted his foreign policy experience during Thursday’s first general session at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference. The Virginia native has served on the U.S. Armed Services Committee.

Santorum said he knows the United States is “war weary” but insisted it time to take a solid stand against ISIS.

“We have been not acting. We have been doing a public relations war with ISIS, not a real war trying to defeat them,” Santorum said.

He added that U.S. military forces should be expanded to assist Kurdish Peshmerga Forces and the Jordanians. 

Paul Phillips stands in front of his home. He rebuilt on his lot after the 2013 tornado destroyed his house.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

It’s been two years since a deadly EF-5 tornado swept through Moore, Oklahoma, taking the lives of 24 people, including seven children, and destroying nearly 1,100 homes. In the months following the storm, there was a housing boom, but that surge has since plateaued.

It’s easy to drive through Moore and south Oklahoma City to figure out exactly where the tornado came through two years ago. Construction vehicles crowd streets, overgrown weeds occupy lots where homes used to be and clusters of new houses pepper the once-established neighborhoods.

A mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle, or MRAP, that has been converted for local agency use at the Summit County Sheriff's office in Ohio.
Seluryar / Flickr Creative Commons

Law enforcement agencies across Oklahoma may have to return military-style equipment after President Barack Obama announced he is prohibiting the federal government from providing certain vehicles and firearms through the Law Enforcement Support Office.

After a string of racially fueled protests across the country, Obama says the federal government will no longer fund certain equipment for local agencies, including tracked armored vehicles and firearms and ammunition .50 caliber or higher.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt admitted Wednesday his office incorrectly cited documents in a brief submitted to the U.S. Supreme Court ahead of the lethal injection case. Spokesman Aaron Cooper says the error was "inadvertent."

Marcus Prince drives his Jeep Liberty for the rideshare company Lyft
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Gov. Mary Fallin signed legislation last week regulating the rideshare industry. The so-called “Uber” bill clarifies insurance requirements and creates a “zero tolerance” drug and alcohol policy. But the new law intentionally leaves out sexual orientation and gender identity in its non-discrimination clause.

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Preliminary damage reports from Wednesday’s storms show multiple EF-2 tornadoes hit the metro area. The severe weather injured dozens of people and killed at least one. Residents across the state are trying to get back on their feet. 

Gov. Mary Fallin meets with firefighters in Bridge Creek Thursday morning, a day after a tornado destroyed several buildings in the central Oklahoma community.
Gov. Mary Fallin / Facebook

Updated 12:14 p.m.: Fallin tours damage in Bridge Creek, addresses the state

Gov. Mary Fallin thanked first responders, charitable volunteers, law enforcement, and emergency workers as she met with members of the Bridge Creek Fire Department and toured damage in the area Thursday morning.

She said the state of emergency she declared Wednesday for 12 Oklahoma counties will allow counties to make emergency purchases without limitations.

Wesley Fryer / Flickr.com

Governor Mary Fallin signed legislation Monday allowing judicial discretion for a number of nonviolent crimes.

House Bill 1518, known as the Justice Safety Valve Act, permits judges to lessen mandatory minimum sentences when the term is “not necessary for the protection of the public” and could “result in substantial injustice to the defendant.”  

The death chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday morning on Oklahoma’s death penalty protocol and whether the use of a new sedative might cause cruel and unusual punishment. 

Justices took turns asking heated questions to both Robin Konrad, who represents the Oklahoma death row inmates, and Oklahoma Solicitor General Patrick Wyrick.

Justice Anthony Kennedy is often the pivotal vote in close cases. He remained quiet through the hearing and did little to reveal which way he was leaning.  

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