KGOU

Kate Carlton Greer

KGOU News Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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A supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at the Oklahoma Republican Party's watch party at Main Event in Oklahoma City
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

There were few surprises at the national level as Oklahoma voters overwhelmingly chose Republican nominee Donald Trump to become the 45th president of the United States.

McAlester's 4th Ward councilman Robert Karr stands in front of his home in Oct. 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

After finishing up work at the airplane manufacturing plant where Robert Karr has worked for more than three decades, the McAlester city councilman drives his pickup truck around the town's 4th ward. Karr has lived in this area almost his entire life, save for six years when his family moved out of town.

 

His 4th ward roots are deep, and Karr knows his constituents well.

Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater speaks to the Board of County Commissioners on Nov. 2.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma County's Board of County Commissioners met Wednesday morning and discussed last month’s investigatory audit of the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office, but ultimately voted to defer a decision until next week. The deferment means a decision regarding Sheriff John Whetsel’s tenure will not be made until after the Nov. 8 election, where Whetsel is seeking re-election for a sixth term.

Dashcam footage for the Oklahoma Highway Patrol show the final pursuit of suspect Michael Vance
Oklahoma Highway Patrol

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says the investigation into a shooting spree last week that left two dead and at least four more injured is still wide open.

At a press conference Tuesday, the OHP released footage of the final interaction between Michael Vance and five state troopers. Chief of Patrol Rick Adams says the suspect fought until the very end during Sunday evening’s gunfight in Custer County.

Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel speaks at a Michael Vance press conference on Oct. 31, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Editor's Note: Since this post was originally published, authorities have apprehended a third suspect related to the Michael Vance case. Danny Roach, Reginald Moore and April Harden are now all in custody at the Oklahoma County Jail. This post now reflects those updates. 

 

Oklahoma County Republican Party Chairman Daren Ward
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

The Oklahoma County GOP is calling for Sheriff John Whetsel to suspend himself pending the results of an investigation.

 

Chairman Daren Ward says an investigative audit released last week shows possible instances of embezzlement, bribery and corruption. He argued the findings further mistrust citizens have in their officials and said, if true, Whetsel should self-suspend immediately.

Oklahoma Highway Patrol

Michael Vance, the man wanted for first-degree murder after shooting and killing two people and wounding four others a week ago, has been shot and killed by Oklahoma Highway Patrol troopers.

Updated October 31, 6:02 a.m.  

Vance eluded law enforcement for nearly a week after the violent crime spree that started Sunday, October 24.

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says Vance was spotted Sunday, October 30 near a camp site in the rural community of Hammon.

Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh speaks to members on the House Criminal Justice and Corrections Committee on October 19, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections says one of its biggest challenges is recruiting and retaining employees.

During an interim study Wednesday, Prison Director Joe Allbaugh told lawmakers turnover for the agency is roughly 28 percent. Correctional officers in particular, Allbaugh said, are even harder to retain. Turnover for those positions is approaching 40 percent.

He blamed the high-stress nature of the job combined with low-pay and long hours and said many cadets have a false idea of what being a prison officer entails.  

Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel gestures as he answers a question at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 30, 2008.
AP

The state auditor’s office released findings Tuesday from an investigation into the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office. The findings say the sheriff’s office unlawfully spent department funds under John Whetsel’s leadership.

According to the review, the department failed to pay healthcare contracts even though money was available at the time. Auditors also determined Whetsel purchased nearly $1 million worth of vehicles while other obligations weren’t met.

Carla Quillen, a proponent of SQ 780/781 stands outside her office on Aug. 30, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s prisons are crowded, and the state continues to incarcerate offenders at the second- highest rate in the nation, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Two state questions on the November 8 ballot aim to ease both of those strains.  

Tulsa Police Department

The State Medical Examiner released a toxicology report Tuesday for an unarmed man fatally shot in Tulsa last month. The results show Terence Crutcher had “acute phencyclidine intoxication” when Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby shot and killed him on September 16.

 

Supreme Court
Mark Fischer / Flickr

The United States Supreme Court overturned the death penalty judgment Tuesday of an Oklahoma man convicted of a 2010 triple murder. Justices ruled the victim impact statement where family of the deceased said the death sentence was appropriate should not have been admitted.

 

Shaun Bosse was convicted in 2012 of three first-degree murder charges in the killings of his girlfriend and her two children.

 

Gov. Mary Fallin announces new cabinet appointments with Mike Hunter, Jennifer Chance, and Chris Benge during a news conference Monday.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Gov. Mary Fallin says she'll still vote for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump even after his 2005 comments that came to light Friday. In a press conference Monday, Fallin said she believes Trump's “vision for America” is better than Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s.

“Certainly I was offended by Donald Trump's remarks about women, as any woman would be. But he has apologized. I accept his apology,” Fallin said. “Those comments were made over 11 years ago, and in the end, what I'm looking at is the platform, the position, that presidential candidates are running on.”

LM Otero / AP

The Oklahoma Senate Judiciary Committee met Monday to study eyewitness misidentification in criminal cases.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma's execution practices were under the national spotlight when the 2015 legislative session began. A few weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a case challenging the state’s three-drug lethal injection cocktail, Oklahoma state Sen. Anthony Sykes, R-Moore, introduced Senate Joint Resolution 31.  

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