Kate Carlton Greer

KGOU News Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

Ways to Connect

Counselor Donte Chattman stands outside the cabins at New Day Camp on Lake Texoma
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Kristen Harlin speeds a golf cart through the grassy fields overlooking Lake Texoma in Kingston. It’s muggy and hot and the sun is relentless. Harlin is the executive director of New Day Camp, a summer camp for children with incarcerated parents.

“All the campers here have the same, common thing going on in their life (sic). So if you get that stigma gone right away, they don't feel like they're the different person in the cabin,” Harlin says.

Leaders address incarceration as soon as kids step off the bus. Then it’s onto normal camp activities.

Gregory Smith
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

An Oklahoma inmate died Wednesday night after a disturbance broke out at the Mack Alford Correctional Center in Stringtown.

In a press release describing the incident, Department of Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh called the knife fight “senseless violence” and vowed to look for a motive.

“We have launched a full-scale investigation into the situation,” Allbaugh said. “We will ensure the proper measures are taken to better manage these situations in the future.”

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City Chief of Police Bill Citty offered his condolences to Dallas police following the deadly attack that killed five officers and injured several others at a peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstration Thursday.

 

Speaking in front of a wall honoring fallen officers at the Oklahoma City Police Department Headquarters, Citty said the department has not received any specific threats ahead of a Black Lives Matter protest in Oklahoma City Sunday evening. 

 

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections begins moving inmates Tuesday to a newly leased private facility in far western Oklahoma, where state employees will run the prison. The agreement between the state and Corrections Corporation of America is a first in Oklahoma’s prison system.

 

The Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s Michael Anderson inspects Henri Matisse’s “Self-portrait” before it’s hung on a wall for “Matisse in His Time: Masterworks of Modernism from the Centre Pompidou, Paris”
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

A collection of 100 works of art by Henri Matisse and his contemporaries is now on display at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, and it’s the only exhibition of its kind outside of Europe.

 

Careful curation

Museum Registrar Maury Ford pulls out a screwdriver and gives it a few quick pulls on the museum’s second floor earlier this month.

 

Carter County Sheriff's Office via AP

A multicounty grand jury accused an Oklahoma sheriff of corruption Thursday and requested he be immediately removed from office. 

Grand jurors allege Carter County Sheriff Milton Anthony accepted a female employee’s bribe of sexual favors in exchange for hiring her husband as a local deputy. The grand jury did not return an indictment but an accusation for removal instead. 

State Rep. Bobby Cleveland stands outside Cimarron Correctional Facility in Cushing in June 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections uses three private prisons, run by two companies, to help ease overcrowding. There are contracts in place to ensure the facilities abide by state rules, but the state doesn’t always take options available to it when private facilities fail to live up to their obligations.

‘Very dangerous prison’

 

Gov. Mary Fallin
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Governor Mary Fallin on Friday vetoed a bill mandating pardon and parole board hearings for inmates convicted of crimes requiring payment of 85 percent of a sentence. 

House Bill 3159 earned almost unanimous support in both the House and the Senate during the 55th legislative session.

Victor / Flickr.com

A group wanting criminal justice reform measures on November’s ballot submitted more than 200,000 signatures to the Oklahoma Secretary of State’s office Thursday.

The two state questions complement new laws passed during the 2016 legislative session.

State representatives Scott Inman, D-Del City, and Earl Sears, R-Bartlesville, debate on the Oklahoma House floor on May 27, 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

After hours of debate Friday, the Oklahoma House drew the 2016 legislative session to a close by passing a $6.8 billion budget deal to fund government operations in the 2017 fiscal year.

 

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