Kate Carlton Greer

KGOU News Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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The Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s Michael Anderson inspects Henri Matisse’s “Self-portrait” before it’s hung on a wall for “Matisse in His Time: Masterworks of Modernism from the Centre Pompidou, Paris”
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

A collection of 100 works of art by Henri Matisse and his contemporaries is now on display at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, and it’s the only exhibition of its kind outside of Europe.

 

Careful curation

Museum Registrar Maury Ford pulls out a screwdriver and gives it a few quick pulls on the museum’s second floor earlier this month.

 

Carter County Sheriff's Office via AP

A multicounty grand jury accused an Oklahoma sheriff of corruption Thursday and requested he be immediately removed from office. 

Grand jurors allege Carter County Sheriff Milton Anthony accepted a female employee’s bribe of sexual favors in exchange for hiring her husband as a local deputy. The grand jury did not return an indictment but an accusation for removal instead. 

State Rep. Bobby Cleveland stands outside Cimarron Correctional Facility in Cushing in June 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections uses three private prisons, run by two companies, to help ease overcrowding. There are contracts in place to ensure the facilities abide by state rules, but the state doesn’t always take options available to it when private facilities fail to live up to their obligations.

‘Very dangerous prison’

 

Gov. Mary Fallin
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Governor Mary Fallin on Friday vetoed a bill mandating pardon and parole board hearings for inmates convicted of crimes requiring payment of 85 percent of a sentence. 

House Bill 3159 earned almost unanimous support in both the House and the Senate during the 55th legislative session.

Victor / Flickr.com

A group wanting criminal justice reform measures on November’s ballot submitted more than 200,000 signatures to the Oklahoma Secretary of State’s office Thursday.

The two state questions complement new laws passed during the 2016 legislative session.

State representatives Scott Inman, D-Del City, and Earl Sears, R-Bartlesville, debate on the Oklahoma House floor on May 27, 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

After hours of debate Friday, the Oklahoma House drew the 2016 legislative session to a close by passing a $6.8 billion budget deal to fund government operations in the 2017 fiscal year.

 

Senate President Pro Tempore Brian Bingman, R-Sapulpa, left, talks to House Speaker Jeff Hickman, R-Fairview, before Gov. Mary Fallin delivered her State of the State address, February 1, 2016.
J. Pat Carter / AP

Shortly after noon Friday, the Oklahoma Senate adjourned sine die. At the same time, members of the House entered the third hour of questions on the $6.8 billion budget bill to fund state government for the 2017 fiscal year that begins July 1.

beer bottles
ThreeIfByBike / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Oklahomans will have a chance to vote on expanding the state’s liquor laws this November.

State representatives approved Senate Joint Resolution 68 and its counterpart Senate Bill 383 on Thursday. The bill provides a new outline allowing full-strength, chilled beer to be sold in grocery and convenience stores and would require clerks who sell alcohol to be at least 18-years-old should voters approve a state question this fall.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

The Oklahoma House of Representatives reversed itself Wednesday on a bill it defeated 48-44 on Monday. The new vote approves modifications of the requirements to become the head of the state Department of Corrections.

Under the bill’s language, the agency director no longer needs a master’s degree or five years experience in corrections. The changes make the Department of Corrections’ current Interim Director Joe Allbaugh eligible.

State Rep. Mike Christian, R-Oklahoma City, (left) on the floor of the Oklahoma House, March 2, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

A State Representative called for the resignation of Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel Tuesday. House Public Safety Committee Chair Mike Christian, R-Oklahoma City, said during a press conference he was concerned about the management of the jail.   

Over the weekend, two inmates died in their cells and a third inmate escaped the facility. 

“If this happened at DOC [Department of Corrections], I can tell you right now as Chair of Public Safety, we would ask for his head,” Christian said.

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