Kate Carlton Greer

KGOU News Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

Ways to Connect

Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh speaks to members on the House Criminal Justice and Corrections Committee on October 19, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s Department of Corrections says one of its biggest challenges is recruiting and retaining employees.

During an interim study Wednesday, Prison Director Joe Allbaugh told lawmakers turnover for the agency is roughly 28 percent. Correctional officers in particular, Allbaugh said, are even harder to retain. Turnover for those positions is approaching 40 percent.

He blamed the high-stress nature of the job combined with low-pay and long hours and said many cadets have a false idea of what being a prison officer entails.  

Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel gestures as he answers a question at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, July 30, 2008.

The state auditor’s office released findings Tuesday from an investigation into the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office. The findings say the sheriff’s office unlawfully spent department funds under John Whetsel’s leadership.

According to the review, the department failed to pay healthcare contracts even though money was available at the time. Auditors also determined Whetsel purchased nearly $1 million worth of vehicles while other obligations weren’t met.

Carla Quillen, a proponent of SQ 780/781 stands outside her office on Aug. 30, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s prisons are crowded, and the state continues to incarcerate offenders at the second- highest rate in the nation, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Two state questions on the November 8 ballot aim to ease both of those strains.  

Tulsa Police Department

The State Medical Examiner released a toxicology report Tuesday for an unarmed man fatally shot in Tulsa last month. The results show Terence Crutcher had “acute phencyclidine intoxication” when Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby shot and killed him on September 16.


Supreme Court
Mark Fischer / Flickr

The United States Supreme Court overturned the death penalty judgment Tuesday of an Oklahoma man convicted of a 2010 triple murder. Justices ruled the victim impact statement where family of the deceased said the death sentence was appropriate should not have been admitted.


Shaun Bosse was convicted in 2012 of three first-degree murder charges in the killings of his girlfriend and her two children.


Gov. Mary Fallin announces new cabinet appointments with Mike Hunter, Jennifer Chance, and Chris Benge during a news conference Monday.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Gov. Mary Fallin says she'll still vote for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump even after his 2005 comments that came to light Friday. In a press conference Monday, Fallin said she believes Trump's “vision for America” is better than Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s.

“Certainly I was offended by Donald Trump's remarks about women, as any woman would be. But he has apologized. I accept his apology,” Fallin said. “Those comments were made over 11 years ago, and in the end, what I'm looking at is the platform, the position, that presidential candidates are running on.”

LM Otero / AP

The Oklahoma Senate Judiciary Committee met Monday to study eyewitness misidentification in criminal cases.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma's execution practices were under the national spotlight when the 2015 legislative session began. A few weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a case challenging the state’s three-drug lethal injection cocktail, Oklahoma state Sen. Anthony Sykes, R-Moore, introduced Senate Joint Resolution 31.  

Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler speaks to reporters Thursday after filing charges against Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby
John Durkee / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Prosecutors filed felony charges Thursday against a Tulsa police officer involved in the shooting death of an unarmed black man. The charges come less than a week after Terence Crutcher was shot Friday.

The execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Attorney General Scott Pruitt says Oklahoma should consider adopting execution protocols using nitrogen gas in addition to lethal injection methods. Executions are currently on hold in the state while officials develop new procedures after executions went awry in 2014 and 2015.

Gov. Mary Fallin delivers her 2016 State of the State address Feb. 1, 2016.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin announced a new criminal justice task force Wednesday. The 18-member group wants to have data-driven policy reforms proposed in time for the 2017 legislative session.


Fallin says The Oklahoma Justice Reform Task Force aims to reduce Oklahoma’s prison population while maintaining public safety and controlling the ever-increasing cost of the the state’s corrections system. Annually, Oklahoma pays roughly $500 million to the Department of Corrections.

Oklahoma state Capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Gov. Mary Fallin signed election proclamations Monday for five state questions that will now be on November’s general election ballot.

Sgt. Rob Gallavan loads his department-issued rifle into his patrol car trunk on Aug. 1, 2016
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

A string of violent attacks across the country has many cops on high alert. And now, some departments are arming officers with more powerful gear. In Oklahoma City, that means police can soon start carrying personally owned rifles on duty, a decision that’s leading the department to find a balance between gearing up and preserving community relations.

'No longer rare'

It’s police sergeant Rob Gallavan’s day off. There’s a large black bag sitting on his kitchen table. He unzips it and casually removes a solid black, department-issued firearm.

Oklahoma Supreme Court Chambers
ensign_beedrill / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has rewritten ballot titles of two state questions designed to reform the state’s criminal justice system.

Justices voted 6-2 Monday to revise the descriptions of the proposals after determining the submitted versions by both a local grassroots organization and Attorney General Scott Pruitt were “misleading and partial.”

Kris Steele, left, Chair of Oklahomans for Criminal Justice Reform, and Ryan Kiesel, second from left, Executive Director, American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma, deliver petitions to the Oklahoma Secretary of State
Sue Ogrocki / AP

A grassroots group wanting criminal justice reform measures on the November ballot is asking the Oklahoma Supreme Court to intervene after Attorney General Scott Pruitt rewrote the ballot title language.

Pruitt wrote new descriptions last month for both State Question 780 and 781 after determining the submitted language was insufficient, eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley reports: