Kate Carlton Greer

Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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Higher Education
12:30 pm
Tue March 31, 2015

Former State Lawmaker Jabar Shumate Named University Of Oklahoma VP For Diversity

University of Oklahoma President David Boren announces the appointment of Jabar Shumate as OU's new Vice President for the University Community during a Tuesday press conference.
Kate Carlton Greer KGOU

University of Oklahoma President David Boren has named former state Senator and Representative Jabar Shumate as OU's Vice President for the University, a newly created role that will focus on diversity and outreach.

"I knew that this person had to be someone in whom I had complete trust. Complete trust in their actions, complete trust in their motives, complete trust in their good judgment," Boren said during a Tuesday press conference. 

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2:14 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

SAE National President Criticizes Boren In Facebook Post

In the post, which has since been deleted, Sigma Alpha Epsilon national president Brad Cohen noted that there is a difference between formally learning a racist chant and hearing and repeating such a chant. He called Boren's statements during the press conference "inflammatory and self serving."
Sigma Alpha Epsilon national president Brad Cohen posted a Facebook status criticizing comments made about national organization by OU President David Boren during a press conference Friday. In the post, Cohen noted that there is a difference between formally learning a racist chant and hearing and repeating such a chant.
Oklahoma News
6:50 am
Tue March 17, 2015

Diversity Concerns Linger On University Of Oklahoma Campus

Demonstrators gather outside Evans Hall on the University of Oklahoma campus last week to protest the video with racist chants by Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity members.
Kate Carlton Greer KGOU

In the days after a racially charged video circulated on social media and gained national attention, minority students at the University of Oklahoma spoke out, many expressing concerns about their experiences on campus.

The leaked video shows Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity members chanting that African American males would never be allowed in their organization. It was blatantly racist, and emotions ran high with students and faculty at the university.

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Oklahoma News
5:54 pm
Tue March 10, 2015

Two Students Expelled From University Of Oklahoma Over Racist Video

Demonstrators gather outside Evans Hall on the University of Oklahoma campus Monday morning to protest the video with racist chants allegedly by Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity members.
Kate Carlton Greer KGOU

Updated 8:05 p.m.: Apologies from two students involved

Two students involved in the video where a bus full of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity members participated in a chant with racial slurs and derogatory language against African-Americans apologized in separate statements Tuesday evening.

The Dallas Morning News reports both teens are from the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

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Race
3:38 pm
Mon March 9, 2015

Oklahoma University Fraternity Closed After Racist Chant Video Posted

Originally published on Tue March 10, 2015 4:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Education
6:47 am
Wed March 4, 2015

History Hysteria: How Oklahoma's Teachers Are Tackling The AP U.S. History Course

Christine Bond teaches students in her AP U.S. history class
Kate Carlton Greer KGOU

Oklahoma lawmakers are criticizing the new outline for the high school Advanced Placement United States history courses, saying it doesn’t emphasize key figures in American history and that it focuses on a negative view of the country.

But history teachers say otherwise. Educators say they are experiencing more freedom - not less - with the new framework.

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Death Penalty
6:46 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Experimental Executions: State Lawmakers Consider Untested Gas Asphyxiation

The death chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

After Oklahoma’s troubled execution last year, the U.S. Supreme Court decided to review the state’s lethal injection procedures and postpone all scheduled executions

Amid the legal scrutiny and difficulty in obtaining drugs for future lethal injections, some state lawmakers are discussing a new, completely experimental method of execution.

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Oklahoma Voices
11:03 am
Mon February 16, 2015

Oklahoma's Crime-Funded Court System Leaves Many Offenders With Substantial Debt

Exodus House, a prisoner re-entry program, in Oklahoma City
Kate Carlton Greer KGOU

For more than two decades, Oklahoma has increasingly turned to fines and fees from court cases to pay for the court system itself. An investigation between KGOU and Oklahoma Watch called Prisoners of Debt reveals that as many inmates regain their freedom, they’re still imprisoned by mountains of debt.

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Prisoners of Debt
7:12 am
Mon February 16, 2015

Without Structure, Stability, Many Offenders End Up "Right Back In Jail"

Brandon Randall, 36, looks for jobs online at The Employment and Education Ministry in Oklahoma City
Kate Carlton Greer KGOU

Editor's Note: This is the final radio segment in a series of stories reported jointly by Oklahoma Watch and KGOU Radio.

For many convicted felons leaving Oklahoma prisons, repaying their debt to society means paying down a mountain of actual debt from court costs, fines and fees, and keeping former inmates from re-offending and returning to prison often depends on help available when they’re released.

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Prisoners Of Debt
6:53 am
Mon February 9, 2015

Over The Years, Court Fines, Fees Have Replaced General Revenue Funds

The Rogers County Courthouse, where Dwayne Steidley is the presiding judge
Oklahoma District Attorney's Council, District 12

Editor's Note: This is one installment of a series of stories reported jointly by KGOU and Oklahoma Watch. 

For more than two decades, Oklahoma has turned to fines and fees instead of state appropriations to fund the court system, and the debt former prisoners now face has becoming increasingly burdensome as the state has grown more and more reluctant to raise taxes.

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