Kate Carlton Greer

KGOU News Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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Scott Kendrick observes two Canadian County deputies during defensive tactic training at CLEET headquarters in Ada, Okla.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Scott Kendrick has spent a lot of time at the Council on Law Enforcement and Education Training’s campus in Ada. Last week, he stopped by to check on two Canadian County sheriff’s deputies during their defensive tactics lessons, teaching them how to get out of a chokehold.

Kendrick spent about 15 years in law enforcement as a full-time officer. He left ten years ago but decided to stay involved as a reserve deputy.

“The reason I left was because the retirement plan was pretty horrible,” Kendrick said. “I wanted the option to retire whenever that time came.”

Family members and friends of Oklahoma City bombing victims gathered at the Oklahoma City National Memorial to commemorate the bombing's 20th anniversary.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Updated 10:31 a.m.: Ceremony concludes as dignitaries, survivors reflect

As rain started to fall on the Oklahoma City National Memorial Sunday morning, former President Bill Clinton delivered powerful remarks that drew a standing ovation from the thousands who gathered to mark the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing.

"For a whole country, you burned away all the petty squabbles in which we engage, leaving only our basic humanity. I mostly came here to thank you today," Clinton said.

The death chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Governor Mary Fallin signed into law a bill Friday expanding the options for future executions. The new procedure uses an inert gas and will replace lethal injections should the Supreme Court of the United States rule the state’s current protocol unconstitutional.  

The process replaces an inmate’s available oxygen with nitrogen through a mask or bag placed over the face.

The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The bomb that destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City killed 168 people - including 19 children. It injured hundreds more, and forever shaped the community.

April 19, 1995 started as an idyllic spring morning - clear skies, calm winds - better than most Wednesdays during the state’s usually-turbulent severe weather season. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary. Workers showed up to their jobs, and went about their regular routines.

That all changed at 9:02 a.m.

It's been nearly 20 years since a bomb destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah federal building in downtown Oklahoma City. The aftermath of the tragedy continues to reverberate through the city and shape the character of the state.

Friday morning at 11 a.m. KGOU will debut a new documentary called That April Morning: The Oklahoma City Bombing. We've produced this sneak peak:

Paul Heath, 80, stands in front of the Oklahoma City Bombing Memorial. He was in his fifth floor office of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building the day of the explosion in 1995.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Paul Heath walks around the Oklahoma City National Memorial grounds, greeting visitors and making sure everyone has information about a self-guided tour.

Heath is a retired psychologist for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. His office was on the fifth floor of the Murrah Building when the bomb exploded. The floor collapsed two feet in front of him.

The death chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

The Oklahoma Senate unanimously approved a bill Thursday that adds a new execution protocol to the state’s list of approved methods. The Sooner State could be the first in the nation to use nitrogen hypoxia if the governor signs off. 

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma announced it’s new vice president for diversity Tuesday. Former state lawmaker Jabar Shumate will be in charge of boosting OU’s low multicultural numbers at both the faculty and student level. OU is the last Big 12 school to add a high-level diversity position.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren announces the appointment of Jabar Shumate as OU's new Vice President for the University Community during a March 31 press conference.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

University of Oklahoma President David Boren has named former state Senator and Representative Jabar Shumate as OU's Vice President for the University, a newly created role that will focus on diversity and outreach.

"I knew that this person had to be someone in whom I had complete trust. Complete trust in their actions, complete trust in their motives, complete trust in their good judgment," Boren said during a Tuesday press conference. 

In the post, which has since been deleted, Sigma Alpha Epsilon national president Brad Cohen noted that there is a difference between formally learning a racist chant and hearing and repeating such a chant. He called Boren's statements during the press conference "inflammatory and self serving."

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