Kate Carlton Greer

KGOU News Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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Oklahoma police have shot and killed more people per capita this year than any other state in the nation. In Oklahoma City, fatal officer-involved shootings are on the rise as well, and that’s causing some to question officer training.

In July, four Oklahoma City police officers arrived at a house in the northeast part of the city. They were looking for Andre Williams. Williams was a registered sex offender with a lengthy record, and he had allegedly just raped a woman.

Sister Helen Prejean and actress Susan Sarandon appearing on the August 31 episode of "The Dr. Phil Show."
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A Hollywood actress spoke to a nationwide audience Monday on behalf of an Oklahoma death row inmate.

Susan Sarandon appeared on The Dr. Phil Show and urged Gov. Mary Fallin to issue a 60-day stay for Richard Glossip.

The Oklahoma inmate was convicted of first-degree murder for the 1997 death of Oklahoma City motel owner Barry Van Treese, and is scheduled to die September 16.

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Oklahoma leads the nation in the number of police killings per capita so far this year, according to an analysis by The Guardian.

Oklahoma City police have been a part of seven fatal officer-involved shootings, which is more than any other department in the state in 2015. Officers from the police department in Tulsa -- the state’s second largest city -- haven’t shot and killed anyone in 2015, despite a higher violent crime rate.

The majority of Native American tribal nations across the country do not recognize same sex marriage.

Because of tribal sovereignty, the Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality does not apply. That leaves gay tribal members struggling to balance celebration for LGBTQ members across the states and the sting that comes with knowing they may not be able to marry within their own nation.

From the Here & Now Contributor’s Netowrk, KGOU’s Kate Carlton Greer reports.

gavel lying on desk
steakpinball / Flickr Creative Commons

An Oklahoma District County judge struck down a law Monday morning banning certain uses of abortion-inducing drugs. The hearing came after the State Supreme Court blocked the measure from taking effect last year. 

The state of Oklahoma argued the law would ban the off-label methods of abortion-inducing drugs because there were "safer” alternatives. But the judge called the special law unconstitutional and said the state was singling out the medication because it is used for abortions.

Ted Eytan / Flickr

The majority of tribal nations across the country do not recognize same sex marriage. Because of tribal sovereignty, the Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality does not apply.

Many gay tribal members are struggling to balance celebration for LGBTQ members across the states and the sting that comes with knowing they may not be able to marry within their own nation.

 

police sirens
Highway Patrol Images / Flickr

In Oklahoma, some people in charge of enforcing the law seem to be skirting it. State audits have found people in district attorney offices have used seized money and property to live rent-free and pay off student loans.

When state Sen. Kyle Loveless first heard about the audits, he'd already been thinking about amending the civil asset forfeiture laws — mainly because the state doesn't always follow the law.

In Oklahoma, some people in charge of enforcing the law seem to be skirting it. State audits have found people in district attorney offices have used seized money and property to live rent-free and pay off student loans.

When state Sen. Kyle Loveless first heard about the audits, he'd already been thinking about amending the civil asset forfeiture laws — mainly because the state doesn't always follow the law.

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Oklahoma ranks in the bottom quarter of states in childhood wellbeing according to an annual survey out Tuesday morning from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The state's placement remained steady from last year.

The Kids Count Data Book shows 24 percent of Oklahoma children live in poverty, and the new survey ranks the state 39th in the nation when it comes to the overall wellbeing of children.

President Obama tours the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution on July 16, 2015
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

President Obama became the first sitting president to visit a federal prison Thursday when he toured the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution outside Oklahoma City. During his trip, Obama urged reconsideration of the current criminal justice system.

President Obama walked down Cell Block B, taking in the two-story medium security prison, with a corrections officer and Federal Bureau of Prisons Director Charles Samuels. He peeked inside a tiny 90 square foot cell that holds up to three inmates, which he said highlights the need for prison reform.

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