Kate Carlton Greer

KGOU News Reporter

Kate Carlton Greer is a general assignment reporter for KGOU. She previously covered Oklahoma's efforts in tornado response and recovery as part of KGOU's "Ahead of the Storm: The Oklahoma Tornado Project." Kate also served as the Community Calendar Producer from January to August in 2013. She grew up in Flower Mound, Texas, and studied broadcasting and electronic media at the University of Oklahoma. 

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Editor's Note: This is part of a series of stories reported jointly by Oklahoma Watch and KGOU.

Over the years, Oklahoma has increasingly turned to fines and fees from court cases to pay for the court system itself. But a joint investigation between KGOU and Oklahoma Watch reveals that as many inmates regain their freedom, they’re still imprisoned by mountains of debt. The cost shift is leading some to question the long-term sustainability of a crime-funded judicial branch.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt prepares to greet Gov. Mary Fallin at the 2013 State of the State address at the state Capitol.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Monday morning Attorney General Scott Pruitt asked for stays of execution for three Oklahoma death row inmates until either the U.S. Supreme Court reaches a decision in the state’s use of the controversial drug midazolam, or the Oklahoma Department of Corrections finds another drug to use in the lethal injection procedures.

Charles Frederick Warner
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

A group of clergy leaders and civil libertarians are making a last-minute plea to Gov. Mary Fallin to halt the scheduled execution of an Oklahoma City man for killing a baby in 1997.

Holding signs that read: "Don't Kill for Me," members of the American Civil Liberties Union, the Oklahoma Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and NAACP met at the state Capitol and called on the governor to stop the execution of Charles Warner.

Warner is scheduled to die at 6 p.m. at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

More than half of pet owners plan to buy their furry friends gifts this this holiday season. And the National Retail Federation says the amount of money spent on pets this season is increasing – up five dollars a pet since 2013. For some Oklahoma pets, that means a very merry holiday.

The death chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester.
Oklahoma Department of Corrections

A federal judge in Oklahoma City ruled Monday the state’s lethal injection methods are constitutional following the execution of a man that went awry in April.

U.S. District Judge Stephen Friot said state’s lethal injection cocktail “does not carry substantial likelihood of inflicting pain,” despite current death row inmates’ claim the practice is cruel and unusual punishment.

Shelly Deas, principal of Lee Elementary School in Oklahoma City, shows the school’s system for tracking achievement and improvement levels of each student. Students in blue are at the highest performing level; students in red are at the lowest.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

At Oklahoma State University’s annual Economic Outlook Conference last week, industry professionals criticized low teacher pay, but forecasted continued job growth in education and several other jobs through 2015.

The Oklahoma Department of Commerce’s Deputy for Workforce Development Diedre Myers questioned how to best prepare Oklahomans for the surge. 

“What do our Oklahoma citizens need to do to have successful careers over their lifetime?” she asked.

Deidre Myers, Deputy Secretary For Workforce Development, Oklahoma Department of Commerce.
Twitter

At Oklahoma State University’s annual Economic Outlook Conference Tuesday, industry professionals criticized low teacher pay, but forecasted continued job growth in education and several other jobs through 2015.

The Oklahoma Department of Commerce’s Deidre Myers wants employers to think outside of basic qualifications during the hiring process.

Myers questioned the value of requiring applicants to have specific majors like economics or finance when looking for jobs in the business field. She says most jobs require analytic and critical thinking skills…rather than an expertise in a narrowly defined field.

Left-to-right: Economists Robert Dauffenbach, Russell Evans, Mickey Hepner, and Dan Rickman during a panel discussion moderated by Oklahoma City advertising executive Rhonda Hooper
Carrie Snodgrass / Greater Oklahoma City Chamber

Several economists praised Oklahoma's metro areas as engines of growth, but criticized state leaders for failing to plan for the long term.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Oklahoma’s poverty rate is higher than the county’s average, and soup kitchens and food pantries across the state are struggling to keep up with demand. 

In a tiny back room at First Presbyterian Church in Muskogee, men roll pallets in and sort food piled against a wall-to-wall mirror for one of the city’s community food pantries.

“This is fun. We sort; we stock. We're kind of the behind-the-scenes worker bees,” Sam Jarvis says.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Hundreds of Norman High School students and parents lined the streets in Norman Monday protesting the school administration’s response to three rape allegations. Protest organizers demanded school officials implement anti-bullying policies to protect future victims.

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