KGOU

Lauren Frayer

In a cramped ground floor office in Madrid, Alejandro Gonzalez Raga recalls the day of his arrest in Cuba, 13 years ago.

There was a knock at the door. It was Cuban state security.

"They said, 'You are detained in the name of the people,'" he recalls. "Well that's one I'd never heard before — 'in the name of the people.' Then they took me away."

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Turkey has now signed an agreement with the 28 countries of the European Union. It's an attempt to stem the flow of migrants and refugees into Europe. From Brussels, Lauren Frayer reports.

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As hundreds of thousands of Arab and African migrants arrive in Europe, Spanish lawmakers meet to discuss the continent's crisis — and all eyes are on one woman. She's the only national politician whose skin is the same color as many of the African migrants crossing the Mediterranean to Spain. But she made a different journey from Africa.

"I was born in Equatorial Guinea when it was a Spanish colony," explains Rita Bosaho, Spain's first black member of parliament. "My parents died when I was very young, and I came to live with a foster family in Spain."

Ascensión Mendieta has finally found her father.

Mendieta is 90 now. She was 13 when she last saw him. He was marched away from their home in the middle of the night, with a stranger holding a pistol to his head. The year was 1939.

Spain's three-year Civil War, pitting Nazi-backed Fascists against Communist-backed Republicans, had just ended. Half a million Spaniards had been killed. But the violence didn't stop. Fascist forces loyal to General Francisco Franco, the victor, continued to execute opponents for months and even years after the war officially ended.

In an interview, Syrian President Bashar Assad accused more than 80 countries of supporting terrorists in Syria, and he said he wants to go down in history as "the one who saved his country."

Spain's royals don't keep their yachts at the Royal Yacht Club anymore.

The posh nautical club on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca still hosts a King's Cup sailing regatta each year. But the Spanish royal family are no longer regulars.

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Last September, Miguel Ángel Galán was busy in his office south of Madrid when he happened to glance up at a TV on in the background.

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