Logan Layden

Broadcast Reporter for StateImpact Oklahoma

Logan Layden is a native of McAlester, Oklahoma. He graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2009 and spent three years as a state capitol reporter and local host of All Things Considered for NPR member station KGOU in Norman.

Pages

StateImpact Oklahoma
8:55 am
Thu September 19, 2013

The Fight For Southeast Oklahoma Water Has 19th Century Roots

University of Oklahoma law professor and tribal law expert Taiawagi Helton says Choctaw and Chickasaw water rights were never revoked.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

When Oklahoma City decided to build a pipeline that would eventually carry water from Sardis Lake, in southeast Oklahoma, to the city, the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations filed suit in federal court saying pretty much all of the water in that part of the state belongs to them.

That was in 2011. The parties have been negotiating outside of court since early 2012, and the case was stayed for a sixth time Sept. 17.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
8:58 am
Wed September 18, 2013

State, Tribes Want More Time to Figure Out Who Controls Southeast Oklahoma Water

Sardis Lake is at the heart of the tribal water lawsuit against the state.
Credit Freewine / Flickr Creative Commons

The Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations sued the state more than two years ago to stop Oklahoma’s City attempt to pipe water northwest from Sardis Lake. On Tuesday, all the parties involved asked for the case to be stayed a sixth time, for 120 more days.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
2:17 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

List Of Schools Unwilling To Wait For Government Action on Tornado Shelters Grows

Credit Wesley Fryer / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s only been little more than three months since an EF5 tornado ripped through Moore, Okla., and devastated two schools. And already, the state’s public schools are responding.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
1:35 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Moore Building Code Changes Likely To Focus On Homes, Not Businesses

An open sign is one of the few items left after a tornado struck this convenient store in Moore, OK.
Credit State Farm / Flickr Creative Commons

When the massive EF5 tornado ripped through Moore on May 20, it took out homes and business alike. Since then, the Moore City Council has been considering updating building codes to make homes safer. But as the Journal Record‘s Molly M. Flemming reports, the city’s construction standards for commercial buildings aren’t being altered much:

Those codes are likely to stay the same, with one slight change.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
1:28 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

As One Battle Ends, Another Sparks Between The EPA And OG&E

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's Muskogee Power Plant was part of more than $80 million in renovations done at OG&E coal plants between 2003-2006.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The clash between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Oklahoma Gas & Electric over pollution from coal-fired power plants continues to escalate.

On Tuesday, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and OG&E both asked the 10thU.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider its July decision in favor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. At issue was whether EPA has the authority to usurp the state’s plan for limiting haze on federal land; a plan EPA has deemed inadequate.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
3:24 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Sierra Club Report Claims Keystone XL Pipeline Fails Obama’s Climate Test

A worker inspects a segment of the Keystone Pipeline before it's lowered into a trench near Stroud, Okla.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

President Obama is still deciding whether to approve the northern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline, which would unlock vast supplies of Canadian tar sands oil for the U.S. and global markets.

During a major climate speech in June, Obama reiterated his support for the project, with one stipulation:

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
8:43 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Can Coal Plants Dump Unlimited Amounts Of Toxic Metals Into OK’s Waterways?

Grand Riverkeeper Earl Hatley stands at the edge of the GRDA power plant's property near Chouteau, Okla
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

There’s a report out from a group of environmental organizations including Waterkeeper Alliance and the Sierra Club that says there are “essentially no limits” on the amounts toxic metals coal-fired power plants can dump into Oklahoma’s waterways.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
2:01 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

GRDA And Gov. Fallin Make Nice As Plans For New Natural Gas Plant Move Forward

Empty coal cars leaving the Grand River Dam Authority's coal-fired complex in Chouteau, Okla.
Credit Doug Wertman / Flickr Creative Commons

The summer was tough on the Grand River Dam Authority’s relationship with Gov. Mary Fallin.

It started when the GRDA announced plans earlier this year to spend almost $400 million to build a new natural gas power plant, and upgrade its newest coal-fired plant in compliance with new federal regulations.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
4:44 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Damaged Land Could Once Again Cost Oklahoma Mining Regulator Its Federal Funding

A gate into a silica sand mining operation near Mill Creek in south-central Oklahoma.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Coal mining can cause a lot of damage to the landscape, and the federal government has rules about how mining companies are supposed to treat the land after they’re done with it.

Basically, they’re supposed to return it to approximately what it was like before.

The federal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement is charged with making sure the Oklahoma Department of Mines is enforcing that rule. If the Oklahoma mining regulator doesn’t, the feds can step in and take over that role.

Read more
StateImpact Oklahoma
11:04 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Longhorn Mountain: Sacred Kiowa Spiritual Site And Future Limestone Mine

Kiowa historian Phil "Joe Fish" DuPoint and Kiowa museum director Amie Tah-Bone stand at the base of Longhorn Mountain, near Coopertown, Okla. DuPoint and Tah-Bone say a new limestone mine will desecrate the mountain, which the tribe considers a sacred site and source of ceremonial cedar.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Limestone mining on Longhorn Mountain, northwest of Lawton, could start anytime. The company that leases the land on the western side has a permit to mine, and just needs to put up some bond money with the state Department of Mines to get started.

This is a surprise to the Kiowa Tribe, which has used Longhorn Mountain for hundreds of years as a temple where tribe members pray, have vision quests and retrieve sacred cedar used in many rituals.

But the mining shouldn’t come as a surprise. Cushing, Okla.-based Material Service Corporation — and President Larry Stewart — has had a permit for a 370-acre mine on the site for almost 10 years. It’s up to the company to decide when and whether to go forward with the project.

Read more

Pages