Logan Layden

Broadcast Reporter for StateImpact Oklahoma

Logan Layden is a native of McAlester, Oklahoma. He graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2009 and spent three years as a state capitol reporter and local host of All Things Considered for NPR member station KGOU in Norman.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:07 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Oklahoma Attorney General Ready To Fight EPA Proposal To Cut Carbon Emissions

The OG&E Power Plant In Muskogee.
Credit Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. Environmental Protection agency on Monday announced an ambitious plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at existing coal-fired power plants across the country as part of President Barack Obama’s push to curb climate change.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt blasted the move, saying in a statement the plan “has no legal basis or the force of law.”

“It will undoubtedly lead to higher electricity rates, job losses and increased manufacturing costs as coal-fired power plants, which provide 40 percent of our baseload power, are taken offline,” Pruitt says.

But officials with the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign in Oklahoma says keeping the current rules unchanged will be more costly because communities are already paying to deal with carbon pollution-fueled “climate disruption,” like flooding, wildfires and extreme heat.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
1:21 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Drought In Southwest Oklahoma Dented But Not Dead After Days Of Rain

Credit U.S. Drought Monitor

The latest update of the U.S. Drought Monitor shows some improvement in the hardest hit part of the state — southwest Oklahoma — after a very wet Memorial Day weekend.

Drovers CattleNetwork’s Angela Bowman looked at the impact recent rains have had across the southern plains, and found that while the last week helped, it won’t take long for drought to fully reassert itself, and it’s too late for the state’s wheat crop:

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:52 am
Thu May 29, 2014

What Became Of The Bills StateImpact Followed This Legislative Session?

The Oklahoma Senate.
Credit Becky McCray / Flickr Creative Commons

From the start of the legislative session on February 3rd, StateImpact Oklahoma had its eye on what was sure to be a heated issue: the coming expiration of a tax credit for horizontally drilled oil and gas wells. Without action, rates would go from one-percent for the first four years of a well’s life, back to 7 percent.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
3:04 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

U.S. Supreme Court Won’t Hear Attorney General’s Challenge To Federal Haze Rule

Oklahoma Gas & Electric's coal-fired Sooner Plant in Red Rock, Okla.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Regional Haze Rule is meant to clear the air at national parks and wildlife refuges by reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:35 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Norman Lawmakers Push Wastewater Reuse In Search For Long-Term Water Fix

Lake Thunderbird in Norman, Oklahoma - June 2013
Kristina and David Flickr Creative Commons

Norman’s water problems are well documented. From dwindling supplies at Lake Thunderbird — the city’s deeply troubled main source of water — to anoverstressed and aging water treatment plant. Not to mention the outcry over the use of drinking water to drill an oil well with the public under mandatory conservation rules.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:48 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Officals: Streams Removed From Impaired Waters List Because Of Better Farming

Bird Creek in northeast Oklahoma is one of nine streams no longer considered impaired due to high turbidity.
Credit Granger Meador / Flickr Creative Commons

The drought goes on, and resources are strained, but there is some positive news to report about Oklahoma’s water.

Nine streams and creeks are coming off the federal government’s list of impaired waters, and it’s partly because farmers and ranchers are changing the way they grow crops and raise livestock and reduced harmful runoff.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:47 am
Mon May 19, 2014

City Of Duncan Water Rationing Unchanged As Waurika Lake Withers

From the latest update of the U.S. Drought Monitor, showing most of western Oklahoma in extreme or exceptional drought, the worst categories.
U.S. Drought Monitor

In October 2013, Waurika Lake, a source of water for Lawton, Duncan, and surrounding communities in southwest Oklahoma, was at 44 percent of its conservation pool. As of Tuesday, the water level was at 39.53 percent, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:25 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Chickasha Sells Water To Oil Driller To Help Pay For Water Infrastructure Needs

Chickasha, Oklahoma
J. Stephen Conn Flickr Creative Commons

When a city needs $150 million over the next half-century for upgrades and repairs to its aging water infrastructure system, its leaders might have to get creative to find the money.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:43 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Drought And Passive Landowners Add Fuel To Oklahoma’s Burning Red Cedar Problem

Billy Hays in the cab of a Bobcat, which Oklahoma County modified to cut and shred Eastern Red Cedars.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

The eastern red cedar tree causes allergies, crowds out other species, guzzles water, and fuels Oklahoma’s most devastating wildfires, including one near Guthrie last week.

And lengthy drought has intensified the problem. But eliminating the tree is complicated by the passive attitude of many landowners, and a state forestry service with little authority.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
11:03 am
Wed April 30, 2014

Supreme Court Rules On Coal Pollution, Dealing Blow To AG Pruitt And OG&E

Oklahoma Gas and Electric's Muskogee power plant.
Logan Layden StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt and Oklahoma Gas and Electric, the state’s largest utility, haven’t had much luck going up against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency lately.

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