KGOU

Mary Louise Kelly

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There was a moment last week in Moscow when I had occasion to wonder if I was being surveilled.

"They'll be tracking you from the moment you land," my CIA sources back in Washington had warned, as I prepared for a reporting trip to Russia. "For God's sake, don't log on to your regular email accounts from there."

I've reported from Russia before. I'm careful.

But one evening, typing away in NPR's Moscow bureau, the cursor began to jump around on its own. Words moved. I raised my hands from the keyboard and watched in wonder as the screen went black.

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A wave of anti-government protests hit Moscow and more than a hundred other cities across Russia today. Demonstrators defied a massive show of force by riot police to protest corruption under Vladimir Putin's regime.

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We are broadcasting from here in Moscow on a day of anti-government protests across this country.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in Russian).

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Here in the Russian capital, and what a day it's been.

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UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in Russian).

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in Russian).

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David Greene is on the line from Moscow. David, are people saying just the same thing there?

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It has been six weeks since FBI Director James Comey publicly acknowledged that the bureau is running an investigation into Russia and the 2016 election.

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And we start with the return of Hillary Clinton and FBI Director James Comey.

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If you had to pick one story that's dominated these first almost-hundred days of the Trump presidency, you could do worse than this one.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Russia is fake news.

In the early days of the 20th century, the United States Radium Corporation had factories in New Jersey and Illinois, where they employed mostly women to paint watch and clock faces with their luminous radium paint. The paint got everywhere — hair, hands, clothes, and mouths.

They were called the shining girls, because they quite literally glowed in the dark. And they were dying.

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