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Former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson testifies before the House Intelligence Committee on June 21, 2017
NPR

Wednesday is another big day of testimony before two Congressional committees investigating Russian attempts to influence the 2016 Presidential election. Notably, former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson (under President Obama) is scheduled to appear Wednesday before the House Intelligence Committee. 

US Capitol building
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Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee in an open hearing on Tuesday. Senators will likely ask about his recusal from the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and what if anything he knew about President Trump reportedly asking former FBI Director James Comey to ease off the inquiry into onetime national security adviser Michael Flynn. Here is Sessions' prepared opening statement to the committee, annotated by NPR journalists.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions reads his opening statement at a public hearing of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, June 13, 2017.
NPR

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee less than one week after James Comey told the committee he could not discuss openly certain information about Sessions' recusal from the investigation into Russia's election meddling last year.

In this screenshot taken from the live video, former FBI Director James Comey listens to questions during a hearing before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence June 8, 2017.
NPR

Former FBI Director James Comey is testifying before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence this week, speaking publicly for the first time since he was fired by President Trump nearly a month ago. The Senate Committee is looking into the circumstances around Comey's dismissal and how they relate to the FBI investigation of Russian interference in the U.S. Election.

Former FBI Director James Comey's opening statement for the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Thursday shows that the president wanted it publicly known that he was not under investigation.
Eric Thayer / Getty Images

Former FBI Director James Comey is testifying before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence this week, speaking publicly for the first time since he was fired by President Trump nearly a month ago. The Senate Committee is looking into the circumstances around Comey's dismissal and how they relate to the FBI investigation of Russian interference in the U.S. Election. The White House has given conflicting messages about the reasons for Comey's firing. Sources close to Comey say the President told Comey to shut down the Russia investigation. That's a charge that the White House denies.

President Trump announces his decision for the United States to pull out of the Paris climate agreement in the Rose Garden at the White House on Thursday, June 1, 2017.
Win McNamee / Getty Images

The United States will withdraw from the international climate agreement known as the Paris accord, President Trump announced on Thursday. He said the U.S. will negotiate either re-entering the Paris agreement or a new deal that would put American workers first. NPR journalists fact-checked and added context to his remarks, including comments about the economy and U.S. energy sector.

Mandel Ngan / AFP/Getty Images

President Trump signed an executive order Thursday relaxing political restrictions on religious groups. Among other provisions, Trump directs the IRS to ease up on faith-based organizations who may have had their tax-exempt status threatened for supporting a particular candidate. NPR reporters annotate the order, adding context and analysis.

illustration of report card with checkmarks
Chelsea Beck / NPR

Before his election, back in October, then-presidential candidate Donald Trump laid out a 100 Day Action Plan. He called it his Contract With The American Voter. Among other things, it called for the full repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act, suspension of immigration from certain "terror-prone regions," and the lifting of "roadblocks" to let "infrastructure projects like the Keystone Pipeline move forward."

illustration of Trump's profile with speech bubble
NPR

President Trump is the latest in a succession of U.S. presidents pledging unbreakable support for Israel. Last year, for instance, the US signed a $38-Billion military aid package with the Israelis even as Washington pressed Israel to make peace with the Palestinians. As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump signaled an intent to bolster Israel in even more demonstrative ways. But lately, in the early days of the Trump administration, the language of support has become somewhat less robust.

President Trump walks down the steps of the U.S. Capitol on Friday.
Alex Wong / Getty Images

Donald Trump gave his inaugural address after being sworn in as president of the United States on Friday afternoon. NPR's politics team, with help from journalists across the newsroom, will be live-annotating his remarks.

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Donald Trump takes the oath of office
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Follow NPR's live blog of Inauguration Day for news highlights, analysis, photos and videos from Washington, D.C., throughout the day.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Stream will bring you live news, photos and analysis from NPR's political team on the ground in Iowa and in Washington, D.C. It will open at 4 p.m. ET and be updated all night.

Get Caught Up:

The 13th annual Americana Music Association Honors and Awards Show took place on Wednesday, Sept. 17, live from the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tenn.

Americana figurehead Jim Lauderdale hosted the evening, backed by a house band featuring Buddy Miller, Don Was, Joachim Cooder, Tim Lauer, The McCrary Sisters, Brady Blade, and Ry Cooder.

Below is a list of artists who performed, as well as a list of the 2014 nominees.

Featured Performers

Loretta Lynn

Jason Isbell

Jackson Browne

One of the men responsible for getting people tied up in knots while they played Twister has died.

Charles "Chuck" Foley died earlier this month in St. Paul, Minn. He was 82.

Foley and his business partner Neil Rabens invented the game for Milton Bradley in 1966. The pair originally called it Pretzel, and it was Milton Bradley who came up with the name Twister.

Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared to rebuff the United States when he said NSA leaker Edward Snowden was in Moscow but is a "free person" who is "entitled to buy a ticket and fly to wherever he wants."

Snowden, Putin said, is in the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport and has neither crossed the Russian border nor "committed any crime" on Russian soil.

Obama In Oklahoma: 'You Are Not Alone'

May 26, 2013

President Obama toured the devastation in Moore, Okla. Sunday afternoon, comforting some victims and pledging federal support. He said that he came to city as a representative of the American people.

"I'm just a messenger here," Obama said, "letting everybody know that you are not alone."

As Recovery Continues, Obama Heads To Oklahoma

May 26, 2013

President Obama is scheduled to visit the city of Moore, Okla., today, to survey the devastation left behind by by a monster EF-5 tornado.

The AP reports:

A new rifle goes on sale on Wednesday, and it's not like any other. It uses lasers and computers to make shooters very accurate. A startup gun company in Texas developed the rifle, which is so effective that some in the shooting community say it should not be sold to the public.

On Wednesday's Morning Edition, David Greene talks with writer and breast cancer survivor Peggy Orenstein about actress Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy to reduce her risk of breast cancer.

A serial killer who committed suicide in an Alaska jail last year confessed to murdering at least 11 people across the country. But Israel Keyes didn't name names, and investigators trying to figure out who he killed are running into a major stumbling block: There is no unified, mandatory national database for missing persons.

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