KGOU

Paige Willett

KGOU Operations Director/All Things Considered Host

Paige is a University of Oklahoma grad who began working for KGOU as a journalism and broadcasting student. She served as KGOU's Community Calendar producer until graduating in December 2012. Paige enjoys comedy, movies, photography and playing the drums. Her Australian Shepherd named Autumn is her small, furry child.

Ways to Connect

Paige Willett / KGOU

At Massive Graphics in Norman, workers stamp t-shirt after t-shirt for the festival. Sitting on a nearby table are neat piles of freshly printed shirts for Norman Music Festival X with designs like a tambourine playing monkey and an acoustic guitar. The screen printing company is owned by Kent Johnson. He’s also the vice president of the volunteer board that organizes Norman Music Festival every year, and he’s been there since the beginning.  

Paige Willett Lough / KGOU

Dr. Karlos Hill is an Associate Professor of African and African-American Studies at the University of Oklahoma and founding director of African and African-American Studies Distinguished Lecture Series. Black History Month is an American mainstay, and Hill says he celebrates it “365.”

In many years, the observance has served to heal wounds and educate people about the achievements and lasting contributions of African-Americans.

Emory University Philosophy Department

Dr. George Yancy is Professor of Philosophy at Emory University. His work focuses primarily in the areas of critical philosophy of race, critical whiteness studies, and philosophy of the black experience.

OU Women & Gender Studies Program

Dr. Patricia Hill Collins is professor of sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park and a past president of the American Sociological Association Council. Collins was the one hundredth president of the ASA and the first African-American woman to hold this position.

Paige Willett Lough / KGOU

As a Professor of Philosophy at John Carroll University, Doctor Mariana Ortega has focused her research on questions of self, identity, and visual representations of race, gender and sexuality. More specifically, she has spent some of her career exploring how these topics intersect, claiming that philosophy sometimes takes a more general view of complicated topics like race.

Hip-hop artist and activist Jasiri X
Heather Mull

 

Singer-songwriter and activist Nina Simone once said, “An artist’s duty is to reflect the times.” Hip-hop artist and activist Jasiri X tries to keep Simone’s imperative at the core of what he does and has adopted the guidance as part of his artistic statement.

“Hip-hop really helped me to find my own identity,” Jasiri X says. “And so, when I started writing music I always wanted it to be something that had some type of meaning, and not just me writing raps to write raps.”

 

University of Oklahoma Vice President of the University Community Jabar Shumate.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

 

 

The University of Oklahoma made national headlines in March 2015 when members of a the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity were recorded singing a racist chant on a bus while traveling to an event. Immediately following the spread of the video, the university expelled two students and shut down the SAE fraternity’s chapter on campus.

Chemistry Professor & Head of Open Chemistry Collaborative in Diversity Equity (OXIDE) Rigoberto Hernandez
Paige Willett Lough / KGOU

In an article for Scientific American, author Katherine W. Phillips suggests that diversity in the workplace can enhance creativity, encourage discovery and lead to innovation. According to Rigoberto Hernandez, those assets may be most important in the scientific community.

 

Author Lauret Savoy
Provided

America’s history is the history of its people, and according to author Lauret Savoy, the history of the people is connected directly to the land. Savoy is a teacher, earth scientist, writer, photographer, and pilot as well as a woman of mixed African American, Euro-American and Native American heritage.

Marq Lewis, of We The People, videos a speaker at a county commissioner's meeting, concerning Sheriff Stanley Glanz, in Tulsa, Okla., Monday, July 13, 2015.
AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

Tensions between law enforcement and the citizens they serve have increased in recent years, and the cycle of violence has led to loss of life for both citizens and law enforcement.

The recent shooting deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile have brought people out into the streets to protest against police brutality. In Oklahoma, the shooting death of Eric Harris in Tulsa led to the arrest and imprisonment of ex-reserve deputy Robert Bates.

A volunteer with Oklahomans for Health hands a passerby a petition to sign at the group’s tent at Northwest Expressway and Meridian Avenue in Oklahoma City. The group is collecting signature for a ballot initiative that would legalize marijuana.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The group collecting signatures for a medical marijuana ballot question is roughly two-thirds of the way to its goal of 80,000 signatures by August 11.

Oklahomans for Health, led by former state Rep. and 2014 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Joe Dorman, is now offering its volunteers cash to collect valid names:

The group is now advertising an incentive for its circulators – $1 for every person who signs both petitions, as long as it’s a registered Oklahoma voter and as long as the measure reaches the ballot.

Former Oklahoma Corporation Commission Member Patrice Douglas
Patrice Douglas / Facebook

Former Edmond mayor Patrice Douglas has turned down the lead job at the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust that would have paid her $250,000 per year. The Oklahoman reports the position’s lucrative salary has generated criticism among elected officials.

Curtis Davis loads a cardboard baler at St. Anthony hospital in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

False Medical Claims Investigations in Oklahoma

About seven years ago, the U.S. Attorney General’s office began working with district court prosecutors to crack down on false medical claims. They are investigated all the time, and settlements have become more common in Oklahoma. Many of the investigations are settled before a complaint is filed.

Adam Brooks, the managing editor of The Journal Record newspaper, said most false claims involve overcharging Medicaid.

A rendering of the pop culture museum in Tulsa.
OKPOP

The Oklahoma Historical Society has applied to possibly build the Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture in downtown Tulsa across from the ONEOK Field. The vacant lot, owned by the Tulsa Development Authority, is one of two publicly-known sites for the museum.

Bob Blackburn, the director of the Oklahoma Historical Society’s, told The Tulsa World’s Curtis Killman the organization is considering all of the options.

Rally goers greeted each other with hugs at the Freedom Oklahoma offices in Oklahoma City on June 12, 2016.
Paige Willett Lough / KGOU

Freedom Oklahoma held a candle light vigil for the victims of the Orlando, Florida shooting Sunday evening at their offices in Oklahoma City. The state’s LGBT advocacy organization welcomed about 500 people to the event.

Peggy Johnson opened the vigil with a song and was followed by local religious leaders, legislators and gay community advocates speaking about peace, healing and love. The June 12th shooting in Orlando comes during Pride Month, and Freedom Oklahoma director Troy Stevenson said that has not been lost on the people in attendance.

Tate Publishing & Enterprises at 127 Trade Center Terr. in Mustang.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Tate Publishing, a Christian book and music publisher based in Mustang, Oklahoma, is facing a lawsuit from Xerox. The printing company alleges Tate owes over $1.7 million.

 

Xerox and Tate have been working together since about 2003, and Xerox helped Tate increase their printing operation.

 

Adam Burnett / KGOU

Despite Oklahoma drivers’ licenses not being Real ID compliant, the Transportation Security Administration will continue to accept them as sufficient identifications to board domestic flights – at least for another couple of years.

A TSA spokesperson told The Oklahoman the agency will continue to accept the licenses through the compliance deadline in the middle of January 2018, although the state could see an extension through October of 2020.

Garland Moore

The City of Oklahoma City is going to try to reopen portions of the Northwest Expressway next week after the May Avenue bridge collapsed Thursday afternoon.

Updated May 20, 2015, 1:22 p.m.

Oklahoma City Public Works Director Eric Wenger said a quote this morning indicates it will cost about $55,000 and take months to repair the bridge.

empty classroom
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Updated May 18, 5:20 p.m.

Two bills regarding a teacher pay raise in the Oklahoma House were apparently a mistake. The Tulsa World’s Randy Krehbiel reported the bills were not intended to be added to Tuesday’s Appropriations and Budget Committee agenda.

jfcherry / Flickr.com

Five county health department locations in Oklahoma will close July 1 due to the state’s projected $1.3 billion budget shortfall. Deborah Nichols, chief operating officer at the Oklahoma State Department of Health, told The Oklahoman’s Jaclyn Cosgrove the closings are only a portion of the department’s cuts.

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