KGOU

Rachel Hubbard

After three years as a part-time announcer at KTJS Radio in Hobart, Rachel Hubbard started her career at KOSU as a student reporter in 1999. Following graduation from Oklahoma State University, she served as KOSU’s state capitol reporter and news director. Today, in her role as associate director/general manager, Rachel continues to oversee the newsroom but also manages the day to day operations of the station. During her tenure at KOSU, Rachel has won national awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc., and the Scripps Howard Foundation for her news coverage. She has also received numerous state and regional awards for news coverage and has been named to Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 under 40. Rachel loves to cook and is fond of non-traditional her non-traditional travel destinations including Timbuktu, Mali and a pygmy village in Uganda. She lives in Edmond with her husband Matt, stepsons Alex and Rafe and her two dogs, Oscar and Felix.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

It was a wild day at the state capitol as lawmakers tried to find new sources of revenue to fill the nearly $900 million budget shortfall and fund teacher pay raises. But, with just three days left to find new money, they’re likely back at the drawing board.

Oklahomans might be holding on to their money leading up to the election. One researcher suspects people here may be even more anxious than voters than other states. 

The business at Dean’s Drive-Through Pawn Shop in south Oklahoma City is slower than it used to be. Brett Fisher's dad started the shop in 1968. Owning a business was never easy, but they did it as a family and still had time to ride dirt bikes together. Brett bought the business 23 years ago, and things have never been tougher.

Two dancers practice in an empty lot next to their International Dance Studio (IDance) in Capitol Hill.
Josh Robinson / Oklahoma Engaged

43 states had a higher voter turnout than Oklahoma in the last presidential election in 2012. We wanted to know more about why the state’s voter turnout is so low.

With support from the Kirkpatrick Foundation, KGOU and KOSU are collaborating on a series called Oklahoma Engaged. In the first of several stories, we focus on the state’s changing electorate.

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Fire approaches a windmill in northwest Oklahoma.
Roy Anderson / Oklahoma Highway Patrol

Updated 4/9/2016, 8:28 a.m.

A coalition of firefighters from five states worked Friday to contain a wildfire near Woodward in northwestern Oklahoma. The flames have scorched more than 57,000 acres.

High winds caused power lines to arc earlier in the week, sparking the fire. Those same winds spread the flames over 90 square miles of dry grassland in Woodward and Harper Counties. No one has been hurt, but farm equipment was engulfed.

25-year-old Adacia Avery Chambers
Stillwater Police Department

Updated 4:46 p.m. 

After weeks of publicity, a judge has issued a gag order in the case of the woman suspected of driving her car into a crowd of spectators at the Oklahoma State University homecoming parade.

Adacia Chambers made her second appearance in court to be arraigned on four counts of second degree murder and 46 counts of assault, but while she was there, District Judge Louis Duel also ruled on motions filed by the prosecution.

Defense attorney Tony Coleman (left) stands silently as Floyd Chambers (right) talks about his daughter Adacia.
Rachel Hubbard / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Two days after the fatal car crash at Oklahoma State University that claimed four lives and injured nearly four dozen more people, the woman suspected of driving her car into a crowd at the school's homecoming parade made her first appearance in court.

Police say Adacia Chambers ran a red light and drove around a barricade before striking pedestrians and crashing into a pole Saturday morning.

25-year-old Adacia Avery Chambers
Stillwater Police Department

The woman held in connection with a traffic collision during Saturday morning’s homecoming parade at Oklahoma State University that killed four people and injured dozens more will be charged with second-degree murder.

Updated 2:07 p.m.: Bond set at $1 million, family addresses media

Bond has been set at $1 million for Adacia Chambers, the woman arrested in connection with Saturday's deadly car crash during Oklahoma State University's homecoming parade.

Thousands gathered at a Christian bookstore in Edmond Wednesday for a chance to meet Republican presidential hopeful Ben Carson.

Carson spent several hours signing books, but he did take a few minutes to talk about the issues facing Oklahoma voters including what his national plan for education would be. Carson told reporters he believes it’s a state issue.

The sun hasn't been up long in Kingfisher, Okla., but it already feels like it's burning. Trucks are moving wheat as people try to get their work done early. It looks like business as usual for a hot summer day an hour northwest of Oklahoma City.

Henry Senn, Jim Willms and Bill Stolz come to CHS Plains Partners, the local grain elevator, just about every day to share stories from the good old days and talk about wheat prices.

Michelle Roselle (right) is a senior at Oklahoma City University and portrays Oklahoma City bombing survivor Florence Rogers (left) in "The 20th Anniversary Oklahoma City Bombing Project," a play from Oklahoma City University’s School of Theatre.
Rachel Hubbard / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Editor's Note: In a previous version of this story, Michelle Roselle's opening monologue was misidentified as portraying Florence Rogers instead of Jenifer Reynolds. 

Everyone remembers exactly where they were when they found out about the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building on April 19, 1995. It’s a moment frozen in time.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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