Rebecca Cruise

Contributor and Guest Host, World Views

A regular panelist on World Views and the primary substitute host, Rebecca Cruise specializes in security studies and comparative politics focusing on issues of security community development, international organizations, post-conflict resolution, political participation and gender. Though taking an international perspective in much of her work, her regional focus tends toward Southeastern and Central Europe.

She has published a number of articles, including pieces in International Politics, Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the Croatian International Relations Review. Dr. Cruise also co-wrote a book exploring international maritime security policy. Currently, she is working on the manuscript for her forthcoming book entitled, Eastern Efficacy: Female Political Participation in Post-Communist Europe. Beyond her research interests, Dr. Cruise has developed and taught a number of courses for the University of Oklahoma including Global Security, Comparative National Security, Women in International Security and International Activism.

After receiving a BA from the University of Portland, Dr. Cruise earned her Ph.D. from the OU Department of Political Science in 2011.

Ways to Connect

Syrian interior opposition member Mahmoud Marai, third right, listens to Elian Mous'ad, second right, during a meeting with the UN Syria Envoy during Syria peace talks at the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.
Fabrice Coffrini / Pool Photo via Associated Press

February’s tenuous cease-fire in Syria seems to breaking down for good.

Opposition leaders blame airstrikes around Aleppo have been blamed on both the Russian and Syrian forces. Civilians and doctors were killed when a Doctors Without Borders hospital was hit this week in the northern city.

Selma Hadzihalilovic
Ambassador Swanee Hunt / Blogspot

Selma Hadzihalilovic didn’t seek out activism. It found her.

She was just a teenager when war broke out in her native Bosnia and Herzegovina. She was training to become a nurse at a medical high school when the conflict between Croats and Serbs turned her life upside down.

Cyrus Copeland, his mother Shahin, sister, and father Max Copeland in a family photo.
Provided / Cyrus Copeland

Four years ago, Cyrus Copeland sat in the living room with his mother when she asked him to fetch his father’s will from the library to answer a question about land rights.

He returned with a box he thought held the document, but he found something even more interesting – 35-year-old papers from the family’s time in Iran in 1979.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the story that dominated international news this week - the so-called “Panama Papers” and the law firm at the center of the leak.

Then Cruise talks with University of Texas at Austin historian Toyin Falola, who dropped out of high school to join a post-colonial peasant rebellion in southwest Nigeria. It took the life of his grandfather, and became the driving force behind everything he does.

Toyin Falola at Sokoto State University in Nigeria, August 2014.
toyin falola / Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

When Toyin Falola was a teenager, he dropped out of high school to join the first major peasant rebellion in post-colonial Africa. The two-year Agbekoya conflict in southwest Nigeria claimed the life of his grandfather, and by the time Falola entered college, the riots shaped everything.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss two sides of international education. China has charged an education advocate in Tibet with inciting separatism, and a one-room basement library in Afghanistan is providing books to citizens once ruled by the Taliban.

Then contributor Joshua Landis talks with Jeffrey Mankoff from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He argues the U.S. tried to outsource solving the Ukraine crisis onto German Chancellor Angela Merkel. They’ll also discuss Russia’s involvement in Syria.

Mateo Mohammad Farzaneh studies and teaches Iranian history at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago. He's just written a book about the country’s early 20th century constitutional revolution.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and University of Oklahoma Latin American Studies professor Alan McPherson discuss President Obama’s historic trip to Cuba and Argentina.

Argentina's president Mauricio Macri chats with the President Obama during his visit to Argentina on March 23, 2016.
Casa Rosada / (CC BY 2.5 AR)

President Obama made a historic trip to Cuba this week – the first by a sitting U.S. president since Calvin Coolidge visited the island nation 88 years ago.

Obama said he wanted the trip to signify the end of the Cold War in Latin America. The 44th president wasn’t even born yet when Congress enacted a trade embargo after the Fidel Castro-led communist takeover in 1959.

Iran's parliament in Tehran, 1906.
Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

Russia and the West are sparring over oil and jockeying for position to gain an upper hand in the Middle East. That sounds like it could’ve come straight from Sunday’s edition of The New York Times, but it actually describes the dynamic more than 100 years ago.  Caught in the middle was Iran, fighting to preserve its young, fledgling democracy.

Yes, that Iran.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss some of the international reaction to this year’s presidential candidate, and how other countries view some of the candidates.

Then Suzette talks with University of Central Oklahoma political scientist Husam Mohamad. He argues U.S. support toward a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is more of a shift in rhetoric rather than actual power.

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