Rebecca Cruise

Contributor and Guest Host, World Views

A regular panelist on World Views and the primary substitute host, Rebecca Cruise specializes in security studies and comparative politics focusing on issues of security community development, international organizations, post-conflict resolution, political participation and gender. Though taking an international perspective in much of her work, her regional focus tends toward Southeastern and Central Europe.

She has published a number of articles, including pieces in International Politics, Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the Croatian International Relations Review. Dr. Cruise also co-wrote a book exploring international maritime security policy. Currently, she is working on the manuscript for her forthcoming book entitled, Eastern Efficacy: Female Political Participation in Post-Communist Europe. Beyond her research interests, Dr. Cruise has developed and taught a number of courses for the University of Oklahoma including Global Security, Comparative National Security, Women in International Security and International Activism.

After receiving a BA from the University of Portland, Dr. Cruise earned her Ph.D. from the OU Department of Political Science in 2011.

Ways to Connect

A member of the black student protest group Concerned Student 1950 gestures while addressing a crowd following the announcement that University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe would resign, at the university in Columbia, Mo. - Nov. 9, 2015
Jeff Roberson / AP

From South Africa, to Palestine, to Haiti, to a small college town in the middle of the United States, you’ll find injustice everywhere.

Clemson University women’s leadership lecturer Saadiqa Lundy has created empowerment and development programs in Africa and the Caribbean, But when Lundy met her husband Chenjerai Kumanyika, she became more of an activist and a protester. She says teaching a subject like that is completely different than actually being there.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the terrorist attack in Istanbul, and some of the security issues these types of attacks continue.

Later, a conversation with Ambassador John Limbert He and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. Many were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

Next week, British voters will decide whether or not to withdraw from the European Union, and Suzette Grillot talks about this so-called “Brexit” with Mitchell Smith, the director of the University of Oklahoma’s EU Center.

But first, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss political developments in Italy regarding the Roman mayoral election, and conflict and corruption surrounding precious gem trade in Afghanistan.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the time they spent in Italy over the past several weeks, and what they've learned and observed about the European migrant crisis.

Then Suzette talks with Purdue University historian Jennifer Foray about the Dutch history of decolonization, and memorialiaztion, commemoration, and responses to war and trauma in the Netherlands.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the new generation of Kosovar Albanians that are being recruited into organizations like ISIS, and a massive sinkhole in Florence, Italy.

Then Suzette talks with United Nations Special Rapporteur on contemporary racism Mutuma Ruteere. He argues one side effect of globalization is that it actually makes it easier to develop racist or xenophobic beliefs.

Political scientist and self-described “military sociologist” Zoltan Barany argues it’s possible to predict how a general will respond to a domestic revolt if we know enough about the army, the state and society it serves, and the external environment.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about former Boko Haram kidnapping victims, and the expansion of NATO as the alliance invites the small Balkan nation of Montenegro to join.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss new London mayor Sadiq Khan, and Germany's decision to rescind the conviction of 50,000 Germans convicted of homosexuality between 1949 and 1969.

Then, Suzette talks with anthropologist Laura Graham and filmmaker David Hernández-Palmar about their work with indigenous populations in South America.

Thom Shanker spent nearly 14 years covering the Pentagon for The New York Times, and says U.S. foreign policy should be about earning respect and trust instead of winning hearts and minds. He’ll also talk with Suzette Grillot about his book Counterstrike that focuses on the U.S. campaign against Al Qaeda.

But first, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss the North Korean Workers Party's first Congress in nearly four decades, new details about American missionary Kenneth Bae's time in a North Korean prison camp, and the cruise ship from Miami that docked in Cuba this week.

Syrian interior opposition member Mahmoud Marai, third right, listens to Elian Mous'ad, second right, during a meeting with the UN Syria Envoy during Syria peace talks at the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.
Fabrice Coffrini / Pool Photo via Associated Press

February’s tenuous cease-fire in Syria seems to breaking down for good.

Opposition leaders blame airstrikes around Aleppo have been blamed on both the Russian and Syrian forces. Civilians and doctors were killed when a Doctors Without Borders hospital was hit this week in the northern city.

Joshua Landis joins Rebecca Cruise to discuss this week's airstrikes in Syria, and the Obama administration's decision to send more troops to the region.

Then Rebecca talks with activist Selma Hadzihalilovic. She was just 16 when war broke out in Bosnia in the 1990s, and she started working with a shelter for women who were raped by soldiers as a psychological warfare tactic. She won the University of Oklahoma’s 20-16 Clyde Snow Social Justice Award, and we’ll hear from her later this half-hour.

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