KGOU

Rebecca Cruise

Contributor and Guest Host, World Views

A regular panelist on World Views and the primary substitute host, Rebecca Cruise specializes in security studies and comparative politics focusing on issues of security community development, international organizations, post-conflict resolution, political participation and gender. Though taking an international perspective in much of her work, her regional focus tends toward Southeastern and Central Europe.

She has published a number of articles, including pieces in International Politics, Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the Croatian International Relations Review. Dr. Cruise also co-wrote a book exploring international maritime security policy. Currently, she is working on the manuscript for her forthcoming book entitled, Eastern Efficacy: Female Political Participation in Post-Communist Europe. Beyond her research interests, Dr. Cruise has developed and taught a number of courses for the University of Oklahoma including Global Security, Comparative National Security, Women in International Security and International Activism.

After receiving a BA from the University of Portland, Dr. Cruise earned her Ph.D. from the OU Department of Political Science in 2011.

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the alleged "acoustic attack" against U.S. diplomats in Cuba, as well as tensions between Poland and the European Union.

Then, Rebecca talks with Brazilian sociologist Biance Freire-Medeiros about favela tourism.

A hilly road in Rocinha.
chensiyuan / Wikimedia Commons

While beach-side resorts and events such as Carnival have long made Rio de Janeiro a hot spot for international tourism, in recent years more and more visitors are venturing outside the glamor of Rio’s wealthy Zona Sul region to explore Brazil’s sprawling slums, known as favelas.

World Views: August 4, 2017

Aug 4, 2017

First, Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise will discuss upcoming elections in Kenya, and a recent report of state preparations to face a global pandemic.

Then, Suzette talks with Charlie Kenney about the ongoing political and economic turmoil in Venezuela.

From Alaska, Rebecca Cruise discusses how Alaskans are reacting to the testing of North Korean missiles that could potentially reach that state. From Jerusalem, Suzette Grillot talks about Friday's attack that killed two Israeli police officers at the Western Wall.

Then Suzette talks with filmmaker Gary Marcuse about his film Waking the Green Tiger and the environmental movement in China.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the French trial of Equatorial Guinea's vice president, and India Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to the White House.

Then, Suzette talks with SOIL director of strategy Nick Preneta about his organization's work in Haiti to turn human waste into fertilizer.

Rebecca Cruise talks with Paul Worley from Western Carolina University about the first indigenous woman to run for president of Mexico.

Then, Suzette Grillot interviews Ted Henken about entrepreneurs in Cuba.

Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis talks about the diplomatic falling out between Qatar its neighbors, and the recent terrorist attack in Iran.

And Suzette Grillot speaks with Laura Murray-Kolb about the effects of iron deficiency on children and mothers.

A community leader presents her group's work in Amouja village in Bihar, India.
Srijana Karki / World Neighbors

In order to reduce poverty and introduce community development, oftentimes it’s best to start with women.

That’s the approach taken by Oklahoma City-based non-governmental organization World Neighbors in its work in Nepal and India. World Neighbors currently works in about 20 villages in Bihar, India and in nearly 32 communities over five districts in Nepal.

The three main areas of work are sustainable agriculture and rural livelihood, community-based natural resource management, and reproductive health and gender equity.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about upcoming elections in Iran.

Then, Rebecca speaks with Volodymyr Dutovyk about the ongoing conflict in Ukraine.

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

 

Ukraine has been in conflict since 2014, when President Viktor Yanukovych fled the country, and Russian troops annexed the Crimea region. Fighting has been off-and-on ever since, with Russian-armed separatists in the eastern Ukraine region of Donbass fighting against pro-government forces. The Council on Foreign Relations estimates over 9,600 people have been killed in the violence, and 1.1 million Ukrainians have become migrants or refugees.

Suzette Grillot speaks to Rebecca Cruise about the ongoing civil unrest in Venezuela. They also discuss U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson's explanation of the Trump administration's "America first" foreign policy.

Then, Rebecca speaks with scholar Reinhard Heinisch about the rise of populism in Austria and the rest of Europe.

 

Austria confronted its Nazi past much later than Germany, and one scholar believes that’s why Austria was one of the first European countries to embrace right-wing and populist politics in 1980s and 90s.

Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis talk about the offensive in Syria, and protests in Russia.

Then, Suzette Grillot talk to University of Oklahoma College of Earth and Energy dean Mike Stice about global oil production.

A demonstration of workers from the Putilov plant in Petrograd (modern day St. Peterburg), Russia, during the February Revolution.
State museum of political history of Russia

 

Women played a central role in the Russian Revolution, but their importance was largely erased from history after the Bolsheviks took power.

Historian Rochelle Ruthchild wants to change that.

“Women went out on the streets to for International Women's Day to demonstrate. And that actually sparked the Russian Revolution which led to the toppling of Tsar Nicholas II,” Ruthchild told KGOU’s World Views.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the outcomes of the Dutch elections, and a food poisoning case that has sickened thousands of children in Egypt.

Then, Rebecca interviews historian Rochelle Ruthchild about the women’s movement in Russia and the Soviet Union. Ruthchild wrote the book Equality and Revolution: Women’s Rights in the Russian Empire, 1905-1917. She’s also a member of The 888 Women’s History Project, which recently produced the documentary film Left On Pearl about the 1971 International Women’s Day March in Boston.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the international reaction to Tuesday’s election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States.

Then Rebecca talks with Mexican author Nadia Villafuerte’s Her work focuses on the difficulties Central American migrants face coming across Mexico’s southern border. They'll also discuss women's and gender issues and access to education.

Nadia Villafuerte
Oscar Garcia

Born in Chiapas, Mexico, author Nadia Villafuerte has traveled across continents to share her research and vision with a wide range of audiences.

In her three solo-authored books, Barcos en Houston, ¿Te gusta el latex, cielo? and Por el lado salvaje, Villafuerte has used her personal and academic knowledge of Mexico’s lesser-discussed southern border to frame her stories.

World Views: October 28, 2016

Oct 28, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the refugee and migrant camp near Calais, France known as “The Jungle,” and this year’s record number of refugee deaths in the Mediterranean.

Then Rebecca talks with University of Texas at Dallas political scientist Paul Diehl. His latest book explores the evolution of peace in the international system, and they’ll also examine the politics of global governance.

An October 13 UN Security Council meeting on the threat to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts. The Council considered the third report of the Secretary-General on the threat posed by ISIS to international peace and security.
Rick Bajornas / United Nations

Raised in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, today’s college students have never meaningfully related to a global security climate that predates ongoing tensions in the Middle East. In a world where constant armed conflict has become a permanent part of collective memory, current events often influence conceptualization of peace as well.

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grllot discuss the situation in Yemen after rebel groups fired missiles at a U.S. naval vessel.

Then Rebecca Cruise talks with Lucio Bianchi. He's an activist and supporter of Italy's Movimento 5 Stelle ("Five Star Movement"), and will explain the country's growing populism.

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