Rebecca Cruise

Contributor and Guest Host, World Views

A regular panelist on World Views and the primary substitute host, Rebecca Cruise specializes in security studies and comparative politics focusing on issues of security community development, international organizations, post-conflict resolution, political participation and gender. Though taking an international perspective in much of her work, her regional focus tends toward Southeastern and Central Europe.

She has published a number of articles, including pieces in International Politics, Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the Croatian International Relations Review. Dr. Cruise also co-wrote a book exploring international maritime security policy. Currently, she is working on the manuscript for her forthcoming book entitled, Eastern Efficacy: Female Political Participation in Post-Communist Europe. Beyond her research interests, Dr. Cruise has developed and taught a number of courses for the University of Oklahoma including Global Security, Comparative National Security, Women in International Security and International Activism.

After receiving a BA from the University of Portland, Dr. Cruise earned her Ph.D. from the OU Department of Political Science in 2011.

Ways to Connect

Joshua Landis and Rebecca Cruise remember former United Nations Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, who died this week at age 93. He served in the post from 1992-1996.

Then, Suzette Grillot talks with Northwestern University social anthropologist Adia Benton. Her research in Sierra Leone focuses on what she calls "HIV exceptionalism."

Poet Valzhyna Mort says her native Belarusian is usually described as a “language of lullabies,” but she called that a myth that seeps into the entire culture. She'll talk about the poetry and language of eastern Europe with host Suzette Grillot.

But first, Rebecca Cruise discusses North Korea’s expansion of its nuclear program and whether it’s a threat to U.S. interests, and the United Arab Emirates’ effort to become the happiest country on Earth.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the potential for a peace agreement between the Colombian government and the FARC rebel group, and the expanding U.S. and NATO military presence in central and eastern Europe.

Then, Suzette talks with Laura DeNardis. She’s an expert the global dynamics of internet governance, and we’ll talk about the development of the Domain Name System, or DNS, and the management of IP addresses.

Rebecca Cruise and Brian Hardzinski discuss Taiwan’s election of its first female president, and the outgoing leader’s visit to a small group of islands in the South China Sea. Both issues are causing problems with mainland China.

Then, a conversation with New York University historian Edward Berenson about the evolution of French jazz music during World War I and World War II, Josephine Baker, and the symbolism of the Statue of Liberty.

The U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom monitors the right to thought, conscience, and individual expression around the world. Suzette Grillot talks about some of their work with the agency's acting co-director of policy and research Elizabeth Cassidy.

But first, Rebecca Cruise talks with Joshua Landis about how the continued decline in oil prices is affecting international markets., and the upcoming meetings on Syria.

Joshua Landis and Rebecca Cruise react to President Obama’s State of the Union address, the release of U.S. sailors from Iranian custody, and Turkey’s response to a terrorist attack in Istanbul.

Then, Brian Hardzinski talks with anthropologist Don Kulick. Even though there are countless public services available in Sweden and Denmark for people with disabilities, that’s not the case with their private sexual lives.

Two riverine command boats like this one were taken into custody by Iran, along with 10 U.S. sailors.
MC2 Ecklund / U.S. Navy

Earlier this week Turkey attacked Islamic State forces in Iraq and Syria after a suicide bombing in Istanbul that killed 10 tourists. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the tank and artillery attack killed nearly 200 militants.

Climate change threatens coastal communities across the world, such as the Gunayala islands off the northeast coast of Panama.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

In Paris last week world leaders reached a groundbreaking climate deal to significantly limit carbon emissions in the coming years, with a goal of limiting the world’s rise in temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Rebecca Cruise talks with University of Oklahoma sociocultural anthropologist Noah Theriault about the Paris climate agreement, and its effect on some of the small island countries of Southeast Asia.

Then, we'll hear Joshua Landis' conversation with Nazila Fathi, a journalist and author who grew up in Iran, and was nine years old when the Islamic Revolution changed her entire life. She left Iran 20 years later, and then returned to cover the 2009 election protests as a correspondent for The New York Times.

Rebecca Cruise provides an update on this week's climate talks in Paris, and Joshua Landis discusses the British Parliament's vote to increase the country's involvement in Syria.

Then, retired diplomat Joe Cassidy talks about his 25-year career in the Foreign Service. In July, he wrote an editorial in Foreign Policy magazine with his prescription to fix the ailing U.S. State Department.

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