KGOU

Rebecca Cruise

Contributor and Guest Host, World Views

A regular panelist on World Views and the primary substitute host, Rebecca Cruise specializes in security studies and comparative politics focusing on issues of security community development, international organizations, post-conflict resolution, political participation and gender. Though taking an international perspective in much of her work, her regional focus tends toward Southeastern and Central Europe.

She has published a number of articles, including pieces in International Politics, Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the Croatian International Relations Review. Dr. Cruise also co-wrote a book exploring international maritime security policy. Currently, she is working on the manuscript for her forthcoming book entitled, Eastern Efficacy: Female Political Participation in Post-Communist Europe. Beyond her research interests, Dr. Cruise has developed and taught a number of courses for the University of Oklahoma including Global Security, Comparative National Security, Women in International Security and International Activism.

After receiving a BA from the University of Portland, Dr. Cruise earned her Ph.D. from the OU Department of Political Science in 2011.

Ways to Connect

Peter Lochery delivering a talk at the University of Oklahoma in September 2015.
Jawanza Bassue / The University of Oklahoma

Earlier this year the University of Oklahoma’s Water Technologies for Emerging Regions (WaTER) Center awarded Peter Lochery its biennial International Water Prize for his contributions to the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere.

Rebecca Cruise talks with energy analyst Andreas Goldthau, who says if Europe embraces technology like hydraulic fracturing, it’ll reduce the reliance on Russian oil and natural gas.

But first, Joshua Landis analyzes Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s surprise visit to Moscow this week to brief Russian President Vladimir Putin on both current and future military operations in Syria. 

A Rosneft oil rig drilling near Ugut, Russia.
Tatiana Bulyonkova / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The year-long drop in crude oil prices has caused economic anxiety across the globe, especially in so-called “petrostates” that rely heavily on oil and natural gas to drive their economies.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss Russia's air strikes on Syria, and what the country's motivation could be for trying to take on a greater role on the world stage.

Then, Suzette talks with filmmakers Paco de Onís and Pamela Yates. They use their documentaries to raise awareness and create social change.

Suzette Grillot talks with Thomas Fingar, the former head of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research. In the months leading up to the 2003 invasion, he cast doubts on whether or not Iraq had nuclear weapons.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis discuss President Obama’s meetings with Chinese president Xi Jinping about cybersecurity, and Russian president Vladimir Putin over renewed tension in Syria.

Ambassador Seyed Hossein Mousavian
Chatham House / flickr

Ambassador Hossein Mousavian has been a key diplomat for Iran for the past quarter century. He represented the Islamic Republic in Germany from 1990 to 1997, and then took a post as the head of the Iranian National Security Council’s Foreign Relations Committee until 2005, where he served as the country’s chief spokesman during nuclear negotiations with the European Union a decade ago.

Joshua Landis talks about Islamic State militants destroying significant artifacts in the Middle East, and Rebecca Cruise explains the ongoing migrant crisis throughout Europe.

Then Suzette Grillot is joined by Braulio Fernández, a professor and literary critic at the University of the Andes in Colombia. While everyone he went to school with studied Spanish literature, Braulio Fernandez gravitated toward something else.

Today on the program, Suzette Grillot speaks with Georgia Tech political scientist Jarrod Hayes about how common identities influence international politics.

But first, Rebecca Cruise discusses this week’s bombing in Thailand, and Thursday’s announcement by Greek Prime Minister Alexisi Tsipras that he’s resigning and calling snap elections.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the problem of shipping hazardous material in light of the Chinese port explosion, Amnesty International’s announcement that they want to see the sex trade decriminalized, and the African continent's first full year without a polio case.

Then, Suzette talks with Taiwanese author T’ien-Wen Chu. She won the University of Oklahoma's Newman Prize for Chinese Literature for her collection of short stories that intimately draws the reader into the text, and chronicles Taiwan's fraught linguistic past.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss efforts to control the proliferation of nuclear weapons during and after the Cold War as the world marks 70 years since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Then Suzette talks with Greek filmmaker Vassilis Loules, who uses the medium to show how hope persists through the past’s darkest times. His documentary Kisses to the Children tells the stories of five Greek Jewish children who survived the Holocaust.

World Views: July 24, 2015

Jul 24, 2015

Guest host Rebecca Cruise is joined by University of Oklahoma professor and European Union expert Mitchell Smith about how Greece got to its current economic crisis, and why its citizens are still on a "quest for hope."

Then Suzette Grillot talks with geographer Kathleen O’Reilly about the gender and social issues of sanitation projects in India.

Police guard the National Bank of Greece in Athens. Undated, uploaded Feb. 13, 2015.
Global Panorama / Flickr

The Greek parliament passed a series of economic and judicial reform measures stipulated by creditors on Thursday, allowing talks to go forward on a bailout package for the country.

If a deal is reached, it would mark the third bailout package for Greece in five years and is expected to be worth as much as 85 billion euros, according to the Associated Press.

In light of this week’s nuclear agreement with Iran, Asia-Pacific trade talks and renewed diplomatic relations with Cuba, Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about why 2015 has been arguably President Obama’s most successful year in foreign policy.

Then I’ll talk with Nigerian filmmaker Kenneth Gyang about bringing attention to issues facing his country through narrative storytelling.

World Views: July 10, 2015

Jul 10, 2015

Saturday marks 20 years since Serbian forces systematically killed 8,000 Bosnian Muslims in the town of Srebrenica. Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss what has (and hasn't) changed about how the international community responds to genocide in the two decades since the atrocity.

Then Suzette speaks with author and journalist Stephen Kinzer about how easing hostility between the U.S. and Iran might be the best way to advance the interests of the United States in the Middle East.

Rebecca and Suzette Grillot talk about protests in Hong Kong on the anniversary of the handover back to China, and remember Nicholas Winton, a British humanitarian who rescued more than 600 children during the Holocaust. He died Wednesday at the age of 106.

Rebecca Cruise talks with journalist and activist Rebecca MacKinnon about information freedom in the digital age. The Internet allows people to organize politically and instantly share information across the globe. But an open web isn’t always guaranteed.

dark keyboard and mouse
Michael Schreifels / Flickr

When President Obama signed the USA Freedom Act last month, he said the measure would “strengthen civil liberty safeguards” in government surveillance programs. The Freedom Act includes reformed provisions from the PATRIOT Act and was meant reign in government surveillance activities.

World Views: June 26, 2015

Jun 26, 2015

Guest host Brian Hardzinski talks with regular contributor Rebecca Cruise about apartheid-era South Africa and the former country of Rhodesia, and why many white supremacist groups embrace the African country that no longer exists.

Then Cruise talks with ESPN founder Bill Rasmussen about establishing the first 24-hour sports broadcasting network and how it became the self-proclaimed worldwide  leader in sports. 

A control room in the ESPN studios in Bristol, Conn.
mike dunn / Flickr

At 7 p.m. on September 7, 1979, ESPN hit the airwaves with the first episode of its flagship program, SportsCenter. Although ESPN has become a staple of international sport and television, cofounder Bill Rasmussen says that when he first pitched the idea of a 24-hour sports network, reactions were mostly negative.

“I had people off the street say [a 24-hour sports network is] never going to work. I had business people say it’s never going to work,” Rasmussen said.

But he believed his idea was a good one.

University of Oklahoma political scientist Paul Goode joins Rebecca Cruise to discuss Russian President Vladimir Putin’s trip to Italy this week.

Then we’ll hear Suzette’s conversation with journalist Barbara Slavin. They’ll discuss what the ongoing nuclear talks mean for U.S.-Iranian relations and the possibility for diplomacy.

Italian newspaper reporters speak to Russian President Vladimir Putin
Press Service of the President of Russia / Wikimedia Commons

Russia may have been excluded from this week’s G7 summit in Germany, but with EU sanctions against Russia up for renewal this month, Russian President Vladimir Putin used a visit to Italy on Wednesday as a platform to speak out.

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