KGOU

Rebecca Cruise

Contributor and Guest Host, World Views

A regular panelist on World Views and the primary substitute host, Rebecca Cruise specializes in security studies and comparative politics focusing on issues of security community development, international organizations, post-conflict resolution, political participation and gender. Though taking an international perspective in much of her work, her regional focus tends toward Southeastern and Central Europe.

She has published a number of articles, including pieces in International Politics, Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the Croatian International Relations Review. Dr. Cruise also co-wrote a book exploring international maritime security policy. Currently, she is working on the manuscript for her forthcoming book entitled, Eastern Efficacy: Female Political Participation in Post-Communist Europe. Beyond her research interests, Dr. Cruise has developed and taught a number of courses for the University of Oklahoma including Global Security, Comparative National Security, Women in International Security and International Activism.

After receiving a BA from the University of Portland, Dr. Cruise earned her Ph.D. from the OU Department of Political Science in 2011.

Ways to Connect

After a brief update on the situation in Ukraine, Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss some of the more under-the-radar protests in Thailand and Venezuela.

Later, more in a series of conversations about identity in international literature with authors Andrew Lam, Krys Lee, and Ananda Devi.

Suzette Grillot wraps up a three week, two continent trip with a conversation from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil with University of Oklahoma anthropologist and International Studies professor Erika Robb Larkins.

Later, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss the five Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film ahead of Sunday evening's Academy Awards.

Rebecca Cruise talks with University of Oklahoma political scientist Paul Goode about competing narratives in the Western and Russian media about what's happening in Ukraine, and why he thinks the crisis isn't likely to end soon despite Friday's agreement.

Later, Suzette Grillot's conversation with author Paul Bogard about the human, environmental, and economic consequences of artificially lighting the night sky. He's the author of The End of Night: Searching for Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

Sasha Maksymenko / Flickr Creative Commons

Media across the world have expressed outrage and concern over violence in Ukraine. University of Oklahoma political scientist Paul Goode says competing narratives in the Western and Russian press don’t accurately capture what has been happening on the ground not just in Kiev, but throughout all of Ukraine.

“The Western media is very captured by the notion that this is a protest between Ukraine leaning towards Russia or leaning towards the EU,” Goode says. “It sort of fits within this Cold War-trope that has been persistent for the last 20 years.”

Joshua Landis provides an update on this week's Syrian peace talks in Switzerland, and Rebecca Cruise discusses the escalation of violence in Ukraine.

Later, a conversation about mother tongue-based bilingual instruction in West Africa with Alice Iddi-Gubbels, the founder and executive director of PAMBE Ghana.

World Views host Suzette Grillot and contributor Rebecca Cruise continue producing the program from the road, and spent this week in the United Arab Emirates.

Later, a conversation with Ambassador John Limbert to mark the 33rd anniversary of the end of the Iran hostage crisis. Limbert and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. They were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

World Views host Suzette Grillot and contributor Rebecca Cruise are in the middle of a four-city tour of China on behalf of their day jobs as the Deans of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies, and comment on their experiences in Shanghai, Nanjing, and Xi'an.

Later, a conversation with environmental scientist Erle Ellis. He spent four years studying how China’s rural agricultural villages used easy-to-obtain synthetic nitrogen.

Joshua Landis and Rebecca Cruise explain how Syria’s civil war is expanding into a region-wide conflict, and what affect two suicide bombings in Russia this week could have on the upcoming Winter Olympics. 

Later, a conversation with longtime Afghanistan observer Andrew Wilder about this year’s scheduled U.S. combat troop withdrawal, and April elections to replace the term-limited Hamid Karzai.

Joshua Landis, Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot revisit the global predictions they made this time last year, and also look ahead to their expectations for politics, economics, culture, and society in 2014.

Later, a conversation with poet Lauren Camp and author Deji Olukotun about technology’s effect on literature.

Joshua Landis provides an update on the ongoing removal of chemical weapons in Syria, and Rebecca Cruise examines the recent executions of high-level government officials in North Korea, and what they could mean. 

Later, a conversation with a trio of scientists and engineers about how three very different developing countries share many of the same sanitation and hygiene concerns.

Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis join Suzette Grillot to discuss subtle reminders of Nelson Mandela's controversial legacy during a week of celebration of the late president's life, and Pope Francis's selection as Time  magazine's 2013 "Person of the Year.'

Later, a conversation with Oklahoma native and former Army interrogator Eric Maddox. Ten years ago Friday, months of his intelligence work paid off when U.S. soldiers captured deposed Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss China 's move to grab airspace over the East China Sea, and ongoing protests in Ukraine over a jailed political leader, and a scuttled trade pact with the European Union.

The Dallas Morning News Mexico Bureau Chief Alfredo Corchado joins Grillot to talk about his 20-year career. His memoir Midnight in Mexico chronicles his coverage of the country’s war against the drug cartels.

Earlier this week a six-month deal was reached to curb Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for lighter economic sanctions. Rebecca Cruise joins Suzette Grillot to talk about the reaction among Saudis, Israelis, Americans, and Europeans.

Later, a conversation with LaNelma Johnson, whose Bahá’í faith led her and her family to India in 1971, where they taught children ages five to 18 at a small, rural school in Panchgani. Johnson told the story of her family’s 12 years in India in her memoir Okie in a Saree.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the implications of the Roma child found living with a couple in Greece, and the October 26 protest by Saudi women in defiance of the country's traditions against driving.

Later, a conversation about water and sanitation in Africa with the University of Oklahoma 2013 International Water Prize winner Ada Oko-Williams, and University College London hydrogeologist Richard Taylor.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss record levels of smog that are forcing the closure of schools and businesses in Northeast China, and heavy-handed tactics by Russia toward its former Soviet neighbors.

University of Oklahoma historian Kyle Harper joins the program to talk about how smallpox and the bubonic plague contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire. His latest project focuses on the effects of disease and climate change on the history of civilization.

The European Union is now pledging to help Italy after a boat capsized last week and killed hundreds of African migrants. Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss how European governments are struggling with refugee and asylum policies.

Richard Clarke is famously known for criticizing the Bush Administration for not doing enough to stop 9/11.  But he now focuses on issues of cybersecurity and intellectual property theft, especially by the Chinese government.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the foreign policy implications of the partial federal government shutdown, and the lingering effects of last month's mall shooting in Nairobi on Kenya's tourism industry and political stability.

Later, Suzette talks with Reggie Whitten, the founder of the Oklahoma City-based charity Pros for Africa. His foundation works closely with Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe, a nun from Uganda who operates a school for children affected by Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the righting of the Costa Concordia cruise liner off the coast of Italy, and the two-hour outage of Iran's internet firewall that allowed citizens access to social media. 

Later, a conversation with New Zealand filmmaker Costa Botes. He’s directed documentaries about Canadian sled dogs, a cross-dressing attorney, and the inventor of the Jelly Belly jelly bean.
 

Earlier this week President Obama asked congressional leaders to postpone a vote on legislation that would authorize the use of force against Syria. Joshua Landis provides an update on what's next in the volatile region.

Later, journalist Erielle Reshef joins Suzette Grillot for a conversation about covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Before returning to her home state last year to anchor and report for KOCO-TV, the Oklahoma City native spent several years working for the Israeli Broadcasting Authority.

Joshua Landis, Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about the fear in Japan that the amount of contaminated water at the Fukushima nuclear power plant is getting out of hand, and increasing number of attacks and violence against women in India.

Later, a conversation with about indigenous people and issues in Guatemala with Francisco Calí. He’s the only indigenous member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

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