KGOU

Sarah Hurd

KGOU Student Producer

Sarah Hurd has worn many hats at KGOU. She worked as Development Assistant, entering pledges and payments. She served as intern for World Views for the Fall 2014 semester, transcribing and webifying interviews. She was also a student in the Radio News class that fall. When Sarah isn’t camping out at the KGOU headquarters she can be found biking around Norman, supporting her favorite local bands and studying for her classes at the OU College of International Studies and Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication. 

Rebecca Cruise explains how a proposed internet tax drew tens of thousands of Hungarians to the streets of Budapest in protest, and Joshua Landis provides an update on a victory by secularists in Tunisia’s elections.

Later, a discussion with Oklahoma City imam Imad Enchassi. As a child in Lebanon’s refugee camps, he witnessed the massacre of thousands of his fellow Palestinians. Suzette Grillot talks about humanitarian work in the Middle East with Enchassi and Oklahoma City University political scientist Mohamed Daadoui.

child in a native american halloween costume
HalloweenCostumes.com / Google Images Creative Commons

The idea of “cultural appropriation” and the use of Native American attire made headlines earlier this year after Gov. Mary Fallin’s daughter Christina posted a photo of herself wearing a Native headdress on Instagram. But if you explore any Halloween costume shop this October and there is a good chance you will find Native American costumes, many featuring a feathered headdress.

But this year, some costume manufacturers are experiencing pushback from people that believe the costumes are culturally insensitive.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about the dispute between Norway and the International Olympic Committee over hosting the 2022 winter games, and the release of an American prisoner in North Korea after Kim Jong-un’s weeks-long absence from the public spotlight.

Later, a conversation with Jean Preston, who worked for the State Department shortly after Guatemala’s nearly four-decade civil war. She says the U.S. Embassy often served as the one place where indigenous leaders, private sector executives, and government officials could peacefully meet.

Jean Preston
Jessica Woods / OU Daily

When the University of Oklahoma’s former Diplomat in Residence Jean Preston was ten years old, she picked up the book The Ugly American by Eugene Burdick and William Lederer at a garage sale. The book describes the lives of American people living in a fictionalized South East Asian country (based on Vietnam).

“I said, "Gosh wouldn't that be a great job! I'd get to travel around the world, represent the United States, meet all sorts of interesting people, get to learn about their cultures, explain our culture and our government to them,” Preston says.

"...a thoroughly modern sculpture by the Scandinavian artist Clara Sörnäs.   It shows five slave figures, slightly larger than life, chained together in a pit.
missy & the universe / Flickr

For most Americans, the word "slavery" conjures up images of the distant past - a land of cotton, plantations, and blue and grey coats. It seems like a relic from a different time and a different world, but in reality, more people are enslaved today than at any point in human history.

Emily Soreghan

The idea of local, sustainable food isn't new. It's pretty much the only way early settlers on the Oklahoma prairie didn't starve to death.

But in the 21st century, everything from home gardens, to restaurants, to huge organic agribusinesses help pass the practices, and the connection between the land and the food that comes from it, to future generations.

Katie Shauberger’s yard has two small garden plots, which she showed me on a cool September night. Katie is a senior at The University of Oklahoma and an avid gardener who has many reasons for growing her own food

Joshua Landis provides an update on the attacks by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants near the Turkish border, and the Syrian government’s ability to focus on battling rebels because the United States is devoting its energy to combating ISIS.

Later, a conversation with Ron Burton. He’s a Norman resident who just finished a year-long term as the president of Rotary International.

Polio Eradication Billboard
Daniel Oines / Flickr Creative Commons

In 1905, a Chicago lawyer named Paul Harris began a small club with three of his friends. They rotated their meetings between their different offices, which prompted them to name it The Rotary Club.

Since then Rotary International has grown exponentially and now includes 34,000 Rotary Clubs around the world with 1.2 million members.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Navy Adm. Mike Mullen reviews Pakistani troops during a ceremony honoring Mullen's arrival to Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 9, 2008.
Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley, U.S. Navy / Wikimedia Commons

In 1947, the Indian subcontinent gained independence from the United Kingdom and split into three states: the Muslim majority countries of East and West Pakistan and the Hindu majority country of India.

“This is very important for us to understand,” says University of Waterloo professor Mariam Mufti. “Because subsequently all of Pakistan's actions on the international community have been driven by this foreign policy that was very India-centric.”

Joshua Landis provides an update on airstrikes in Syria and Iraq, and U.S. strategy to combat the Islamic State.

Later, a conversation with Akash Patel, the founder and executive director of the Aspiring Americans Initiative. His Oklahoma City-based non-profit works to connect undocumented students with educational opportunities.

Students in caps and gowns sitting in rows at a graduation
John Walker / Flickr

While Akash Patel was still a senior at the University of Oklahoma he embarked on a research project for class credit that turned into a career.

“We found that there were a lot of immigrant students who were going through the public education system who were falling through the cracks,” Patel says. “They weren't going to college and some of them weren't finishing high school.”

Rebecca Cruise reports on the Xi Jinping's tour of South Asia and its effects on the future of trade between China and those countries. She also outlines President Obama's strategy to help contain the Ebola outbreak devastating West Africa.

Later in the program, Suzette Grillot interviews groundbreaking social entrepreneur Paul Polak about his strategies for pulling people out of poverty around the world.

When Paul Polak visited Bangladesh for the first time he did what he says people with humanitarian aims don’t do enough. He asked the residents what they needed.

“They quickly told me in Bangladesh that they were poor because they made most of their money from farming on small one-acre farms,” Polack says. “And what they needed most to earn more income was affordable irrigation.”

Joshua Landis explains President Obama's strategy to confront ISIS without pursuing the kind of nation building projects that past administrations have attempted. 

Rebecca Cruise reports on the pros and cons of a possible Scottish independence including questions of currency, EU membership, industry and nationalism.

Later in the program, an interview with Puerto Rican author Esmeralda Santiago exploring her ties to her native country and her relationship with art and activism.

Puerto Rican Flag
banditob

When Esmeralda Santiago arrived in New York City in the early 1960s, she was completely terrified.

“I always think of the trip from Puerto Rico to the United States as probably the most traumatic thing that ever happened to me,” Santiago says. “I was a rural girl. We lived out in the country. I had never seen television. We had no electricity or running water.”

The alienation Santiago felt informed her writing. That turmoil, and her love for the history of Puerto Rico and the voices of characters she heard in her dreams, became Santiago’s novel Conquistadora.

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis discuss the turmoil in Iraq caused by ISIS. Rebecca Cruise reports on state of Ukraine and its possible cease fire with Russia.

Later in the program, an interview with Boston College Near East Historian and political scientist Franck Salameh about the many dialects of Arabic and the future of teaching it.

Arabic Keyboard
Francesco_G / Flickr Creative Commons

The beheadings of American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff by the radical group the Islamic State, and continued tensions in Gaza reignite long-standing questions about why there’s so much tumult in the region.

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma junior Amanda Tomlinson about the speech in Arabic she gave at the United Nations General Assembly this summer and the importance of multilingualism.

Later in the program, an interview with Pakistani actor Iqbal Theba about his role on the TV show Glee, and the role of race in the entertainment industry.

Amanda Tomlinson speaks before the United Nations General Assembly
United Nations

On June 27, the winners of the “Many Languages, One World” contest sponsored by the United Nations presented their essays to the General Assembly. Out of almost 1,500 students worldwide who took part in the contest, 60 were chosen; including University of Oklahoma student Amanda Tomlinson.

The contest required an essay written in one of the six official languages of the UN: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish – any language except the native tongue of the author.

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