Susan Shannon

Program Coordinator / Host of Indian Times

Susan K Shannon was born in Pawhuska, Oklahoma on September 22nd, 1954. She is a member of the Osage Nation and the daughter of George A Shannon and the late Mary Agnes Wagoshe (way-gosh-shee). Her father is also an OU graduate who upon graduation was offered a job in San Francisco, so Susan spent her early years there until the family moved back to Oklahoma. She graduated from Tulsa Memorial High School in 1973. After having attended OU in the mid-1970’s, she returned in August of 1991 and got her degree in Native American Studies in 1996 with a minor in Film/Video studies. She began working at KGOU Radio station fulltime in July of 1996.

She worked as office manager at KGOU from 1996 until 2012. In 1997 Susan reported her first story for National Native News. In August of 2001, she was invited to Anchorage, Alaska for training and to meet the staff. Through those contacts she was given a full scholarship to attend the Native American Journalists Association training conference in San Diego. She has been a Ford Foundation scholarship recipient, which enabled her to attend the National Federation of Community Broadcasters Conference in San Francisco, where the first day was devoted to Native American broadcasters. She contributes stories to the locally produced radio show “Oklahoma Voices” focusing on native people and events.

Her photographs have been in OU Native Art shows as well as Gilcrease Museum and the State Capitol. She has participated in her tribal ceremonials since she was three years old and received her Indian name from then-Chief Paul Pitts. She is a member of the Deer Clan.

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6:18 pm
Wed February 26, 2014

A Think-Twice Proposal for Divorcing Couples

Lead in text: 
A house committee has approved a bill that would require couples with children considering divorce to take a course on the effects of divorce on children.
Feb. 26: Bill Would Require Marriage Program A House committee has approved a bill that would require certain couples who have children and are seeking a divorce to go through an Oklahoma Marriage Initiative program before the divorce is granted. House Bill 2249 by Rep.
Indian Times
8:25 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Lawmakers Come Up With Solution To Finish Museum

Credit American Indian Cultural Center And Museum

The American Indian Cultural Center and Museum sits unfinished at the crossroads of I–35 and I–40. Its financial history has had its ups and downs, but there may be still be a happy ending for the museum, thanks to two state senators, Clark Jolley and Kyle Loveless.

“In determining what to do with the American Indian Cultural Center, we had several challenges,” Loveless said. “One, the tight budget year. Two, the house's insistence on no further indebtedness through bond packaging.”

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Indian Times
9:53 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Newsmakers In Indian Country

Credit Congressman Markwayne Mullin

House Ethics Committee Consider Investigation Of Markwayne Mullin

The House Ethics Committee will consider an investigation of Republican Congressman Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma.

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Indian Times
10:25 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Native Crossroads Film Festival To Premier Native Made Films

Chaske Spencer
Credit musicgrl87 / Flickr.com

The 2nd Annual Native Crossroads Film Festival is bringing several feature and short films that will explore the theme of this year's festival – links between land and indigenous cultural identities. Assistant Professor Joshua Nelson (Cherokee) said this year’s top three films to be screened are making their Oklahoma premier.

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Indian Times
10:07 am
Sun February 2, 2014

Ramp It Up: Skateboard Culture In Native America

Credit Tim Evanson / Flickr.com

Skateboarding is most often associated with teenaged, white urban dwellers, but a new exhibit is providing a different picture of the sport.

The traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian is called “Ramp It Up: Skateboard Culture In Native America” and will open February 8th at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in Norman

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Indian Times
9:45 am
Sun February 2, 2014

Chief Of Osage Nation Impeached

Credit Susan Shannon

Osage Principal Chief John Red Eagle was removed from office last week.

According to senior reporter Benny Polacca (Hopi/Pima/Havasupai/Tohono O’odham) of the Osage News, the problems started last summer.

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Indian Times
2:20 pm
Sat January 25, 2014

Native Americans Are The Most Stalked Group

Credit Susan Shannon

January is National Stalking Awareness Month. Stalking is a crime, and the most stalked group of people is Native Americans.

The National Violence Against Women Prevention Research Center at the University of Missouri at St. Louis defines stalking as "the willful, malicious, and repeated following and harassing of another person that threatens his or her safety."

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Indian Times
2:59 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

Indian Times: Weekly Review

Credit Susan Shannon

Contempt Charges Dropped Against Dusten Brown

A South Carolina judge has dismissed contempt of court charges filed against the biological father of a young girl caught up in a custody dispute. The contempt case was dropped on Jan. 16 after Dusten Brown and the Cherokee Nation reached an agreement with Matt and Melanie Capobianco, who are the adoptive parents of 4-year-old Veronica.

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Indian Times
2:16 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Review Of Last Week’s Top Stories In Oklahoma’s Indian Country

Credit Susan Shannon

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma has been selected as one of the first five organizations in the nation to test a new anti-poverty program to improve life in chronically poor areas. The tribe will create a “Promise Zone” in an economically challenged area in southeastern Oklahoma and use community groups, businesses and schools to focus on specific education and economic development goals.

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Oklahoma Voices
3:44 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Native American Code Talkers Receive Congressional Gold Medal

Credit PhotosNormandie / Flickr.com

During Native American Heritage Month last November, Congress bestowed the Congressional Gold Medal, its highest civilian honor, to American Indians who used their native languages to outwit the enemy and protect American battlefield secrets during World Wars I and II.

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