Susan Shannon

Program Coordinator / Host of Indian Times

Susan K Shannon was born in Pawhuska, Oklahoma on September 22nd, 1954. She is a member of the Osage Nation and the daughter of George A Shannon and the late Mary Agnes Wagoshe (way-gosh-shee). Her father is also an OU graduate who upon graduation was offered a job in San Francisco, so Susan spent her early years there until the family moved back to Oklahoma. She graduated from Tulsa Memorial High School in 1973. After having attended OU in the mid-1970’s, she returned in August of 1991 and got her degree in Native American Studies in 1996 with a minor in Film/Video studies. She began working at KGOU Radio station fulltime in July of 1996.

She worked as office manager at KGOU from 1996 until 2012. In 1997 Susan reported her first story for National Native News. In August of 2001, she was invited to Anchorage, Alaska for training and to meet the staff. Through those contacts she was given a full scholarship to attend the Native American Journalists Association training conference in San Diego. She has been a Ford Foundation scholarship recipient, which enabled her to attend the National Federation of Community Broadcasters Conference in San Francisco, where the first day was devoted to Native American broadcasters. She contributes stories to the locally produced radio show “Oklahoma Voices” focusing on native people and events.

Her photographs have been in OU Native Art shows as well as Gilcrease Museum and the State Capitol. She has participated in her tribal ceremonials since she was three years old and received her Indian name from then-Chief Paul Pitts. She is a member of the Deer Clan.

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Indian Times
9:23 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Comanche Code Talkers Remembered

Credit Comanche National Museum & Cultural Center

During World Wars I and II, the United States military used select Native American service men to relay secret battle messages based on words from their native languages. These groups came to be known as “Code Talkers” and were the unsung heroes of those world wars. The Comanche Code Talkers were pledged to secrecy about their work in World Wars I and II, and they kept that secret until the program was declassified.

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Indian Times
9:46 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Lois Bougetah Smoky, Kiowa Artist Ahead Of Her Time

Heather Ahtone
Credit Lester Harragarra

The Jacobson House in Norman is currently exhibiting work from the only female member of the Kiowa Five, Lois Bougetah Smoky. The Kiowa Five were a group of Kiowa artists that were brought to the University of Oklahoma by Oscar Jacobson, the first Director of the OU Art School.

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Indian Times
7:30 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

NARF And NCAI Advise Tribes To Stay Away From Supreme Court

John Echohawk
Credit Native American Rights Fund

The relationship between the Supreme Court of the United States and Native Americans has a rocky history and recent rulings have not gone the way Indian Country hoped. The Supreme Court, friend or foe, is charged with interpreting the law of the land.

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Indian Times
8:54 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Kiowa Tipi Resurfaces After Almost 100 Years

Matt Reed with Kiowa Tipi
Credit Susan Shannon

A Kiowa tipi over 100 years old was “discovered” amidst the artifacts at the Oklahoma History Center by Matt Reed, Curator of the American Indian collections for the Oklahoma Historical Society. Reed, a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma, at first was reluctant to believe he had… what he had.

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Indian Times
9:08 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Return To Longhorn Mountain: An Update

View from Longhorn Mountain
Credit Warren Queton

Summer is coming to a close and it was a headline making summer for Oklahoma’s natives and tribes. We revisit one of those stories, the fate of Longhorn Mountain.

Last June, it was learned that half of Longhorn Mountain near Lawton had been leased to a rock crushing company that would soon start mining gravel. Longhorn Mountain is a sacred site to the Kiowa Tribe that had passed out of tribal ownership, and though the tribe had been notified by the Oklahoma Department of Transportation about the construction of a road, they didn’t understand what exactly was going to happen.

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Indian Times
8:40 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Tourism In Indian Country Unlikely Key To Preserving Culture

American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association
Credit AIANTA

Tourism in Indian Country…what does that bring to mind?  White tourists looking at baubles, bangles and bright shiny beads?  The American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association, or AIANTA, thinks it’s so much more than that.  The organization was formed in 1993 to help tribes recognize that cultural tourism could help preserve traditions.

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Indian Times
10:56 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

How A Granddaughter’s Memory And Her Persistent Husband Relocate Bust of Ancestor

Evelyn Trumbly Taylor with the bust of her grandfather Albert Penn
Credit Larry Taylor

100 years ago, give or take a year, according to whom you are speaking, the Smithsonian sent an artist out to different reservations to make busts of Native Americans, the thinking being that these were a “vanishing people” and should be preserved for posterity.

Then, these busts were forgotten, becoming just more acquisitions for the Smithsonian Institution’s vast holdings.

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Indian Times
3:32 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Indian Nations Celebrate Labor Day Indian Style

Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur, Oklahoma
Credit Susan Shannon

Labor Day signals the end of summer but it also means that some of the largest Native American celebrations are going to happen in Oklahoma.

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Indian Times
8:52 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

“Baby Friendly Initiative” Promotes That Breast Is Best

Native Woman Breast Feeding Her Child
Credit Drawing by Robert Sisk (Loyal Shawnee/Eastern Delaware)

How a baby begins life after birth affects the rest of the baby’s development. The Baby Friendly Initiative, begun by the World Health Organization and UNICEF, recognizes that. It currently has made inroads in 152 countries, including the United States, and now Oklahoma. The first hospital to make the grade is Claremore Indian Hospital.

Georgiana Sweetwater, who goes by Gibby and is from the Pawnee Nation, is the Nurse Manager for OB In-Patient Services and Women’s Clinic. She attended a workshop sponsored by the United Nations in Albuquerque.

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Sand Creek Massacre Of 1864
8:18 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Descendants of Sand Creek Massacre Determined To Get Justice

Sand Creek Battle Ground Monument
Credit jb1Ookie / Flickr.com

The Sand Creek Massacre of 1864 is one of the darkest hours in the history between the US Government and Native American Tribes. To add insult to injury, certain reparations were promised in the Treaty of Little Arkansas, but never happened. So the descendants are taking their grievances to court.

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