KGOU

Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

In this Thursday Jan. 7, 2016 photo, an elderly woman drinks water from a bucket after waiting for hours for the municipality to deliver free water, in Senekal, South Africa.
Denis Farrell / AP

As resource distribution issues grow increasingly global, so do the organizations dedicated to solving them. From the Wounded Warrior Project to Water for People, Ned Breslin has used his experience to transform how nongovernmental organizations approach issues of water and sanitation in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

World Views: December 2, 2016

Dec 2, 2016

University of Nebraska political scientist Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado joins Suzette Grillot to discuss the legacy of Fidel Castro, who died November 25.

Then Suzette talks with Ned Breslin about the 20 years he spent in Africa working on water and sanitation issues.

Then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally organized by Tea Party Patriots on Capitol Hill, Sept. 9,2015, to oppose the Iran nuclear agreement.
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Unusual, unpredictable and inescapable in US media coverage, the American presidential election also dominated news outlets across the globe.

World Views: November 18, 2016

Nov 18, 2016

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis discuss the escalating tension in Egypt over the country's perilous economic situation, a crackdown on dissent, and its increasingly fraught relationship with Saudi Arabia.

Then Grillot talks with University of Virginia civil and environmental engineer Jim Smith. He's the founder of the non-profit organization that works to provide clean water and sanitation technology to developing parts of South Africa.

Volunteers from the Kheir Zaman local supermarket sell a kilogram of sugar for 7.50 L.E. (0.84 US cents), in the Sayeda Zeinab neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt - October 26, 2016.
Nariman El-Mofty / AP

A week ago the International Monetary Fund approved a $12 billion loan to Egypt as the country slips into a perilous economic situation created by a declining currency, food shortages, and a strained relationship with a chief benefactor – Saudi Arabia.

“What we’re seeing from one end of the Middle East to the other is no money,” said Joshua Landis, the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma. “You look at the spreadsheet for Egypt, and everything is moving in the wrong direction.”

Workers mold clay pots as part of PureMadi's water filtration efforts in South Africa.
Jim Smith / PureMadi

Since 2000, access to safe and reliable drinking water has catapulted into public awareness thanks to the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals. Amidst a proliferation of non-governmental organizations, charities and UN initiatives, the search for truly sustainable solutions to water access and cleanliness has intensified.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the international reaction to Tuesday’s election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States.

Then Rebecca talks with Mexican author Nadia Villafuerte’s Her work focuses on the difficulties Central American migrants face coming across Mexico’s southern border. They'll also discuss women's and gender issues and access to education.

World Views: November 4, 2016

Nov 4, 2016

University of Oklahoma Vice President for Weather and Climate Programs, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences Dean, and National Weather Center director Berrien Moore talks with Suzette Grillot about his involvement with last year’s Paris Climate Conference, and some of the domestic politics surrounding climate change.

But first, Joshua Landis provides an update on the Middle East, including the latest on the fight against ISIS in the Iraqi city of Mosul.

Participants attend a panel entitled "Science on a Sphere Presentation"at the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, north of Paris, Dec. 8, 2015.
Michel Euler / AP

Between Nov. 30 and Dec. 12, 2015, 19,385 national delegates from across the world met in Paris for COP21 to discuss rising emissions, green energy, and the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

World Views: October 28, 2016

Oct 28, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the refugee and migrant camp near Calais, France known as “The Jungle,” and this year’s record number of refugee deaths in the Mediterranean.

Then Rebecca talks with University of Texas at Dallas political scientist Paul Diehl. His latest book explores the evolution of peace in the international system, and they’ll also examine the politics of global governance.

Al Jazeera English Channel staff prepare for a broadcast in the Doha newsroom in Qatar on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2006., the day before the network's launch.
Hamid Jalaudin / AP

A decade ago, retired U.S. Marine and current Al Jazeera English journalist Josh Rushing’s life looked significantly different. Rushing frequently served as an interview subject representing the Corps during Operation Iraqi Freedom, a position he describes as “selling the war.”

“I would now call it ‘casting’ without much sense of irony,” Rushing said of his selection as a spokesperson. “I was cast for the position. I was a young Marine. I had a certain look. I had a young family. I fit exactly the bill they were looking for.”

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grllot discuss the situation in Yemen after rebel groups fired missiles at a U.S. naval vessel.

Then Rebecca Cruise talks with Lucio Bianchi. He's an activist and supporter of Italy's Movimento 5 Stelle ("Five Star Movement"), and will explain the country's growing populism.

Brian Hardzinski
KGOU

Just 10 years ago, only 30 percent of American adults reported owning a laptop computer -- a number that has now doubled, according to the Pew Research Center’s latest data.

World Views: October 7, 2016

Oct 7, 2016

During the first presidential debate last month, both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton said cybersecurity would be a significant challenge for the next U.S. president. Suzette Grillot discusses the international aspects of hacks, internet attacks, and political espionage with the University of Oklahoma’s Mark Raymond.

 

But first, Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the peace deal voters in Colombia defeated, and a proposed new law in the UK requiring businesses to declare how many foreign-born employees they’ve hired.

World Views: September 30, 2016

Sep 30, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the legacy of Israel’s prime minister and president Shimon Peres, who died this week, and President Obama’s nomination of the first U.S. Ambassador to Cuba in decades.

 

Then Suzette talks with the University of Oklahoma’s Diplomat In Residence Rob Andrew. He's spent 13 years in the Foreign Service, including assignments in Mexico, Costa Rica, Sweden, and Russia.

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