Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

President Obama talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry during the 70th United Nations General Assembly Sept. 28, 2015.
Pete Souza / The White House

In the wake of Russian aggression in the region, President Obama announced Wednesday that he will be strengthening America’s military presence in Eastern Europe.

"As we approach the 2016 NATO Summit in Warsaw, it is clear that the United States and our allies must do more to advance our common defense in support of a Europe that is whole, free, and at peace," President Obama said in a statement.

Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) insurgents, 1998.
Institute for National Strategic Studies / Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

President Obama has agreed to seek financial support from Congress to support the Colombian government in the implementation of a peace resolution with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, rebel group.

The resolution, Peace Colombia, would end 50 years of conflict in the nation. Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said he expects to sign the deal next month, but both FARC and the Colombian government have agreed to a March 23 deadline, reports the BBC’s Natalio Cosby:

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the potential for a peace agreement between the Colombian government and the FARC rebel group, and the expanding U.S. and NATO military presence in central and eastern Europe.

Then, Suzette talks with Laura DeNardis. She’s an expert the global dynamics of internet governance, and we’ll talk about the development of the Domain Name System, or DNS, and the management of IP addresses.

dark keyboard and mouse
Michael Schreifels / Flickr

Cars, drones, refrigerators – almost everything is connected to the internet in some way, and that raises significant questions about control and governance. Who’s in charge, and who sets standards?

American University communications professor Laura DeNardis has studied these issues since the modern internet’s infancy in the 1990s. She told KGOU’s World Views countries, industry, and civil society work together in what she called “multi-stakeholder governance.”

The U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom monitors the right to thought, conscience, and individual expression around the world. Suzette Grillot talks about some of their work with the agency's acting co-director of policy and research Elizabeth Cassidy.

But first, Rebecca Cruise talks with Joshua Landis about how the continued decline in oil prices is affecting international markets., and the upcoming meetings on Syria.

Afghan women at a polling location during 2010 parliamentary elections.
UK Ministry of Defense / Open Governement License

In 1998, President Clinton signed the International Religious Freedom Act, which codified religious freedom as an official foreign policy goal of the United States, and established the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, or USCIRF.

Growing up in Ghana, Meshack Asare loved to read, but the only books available were educational texts designed to teach English. He became a prolific children's author to provide the world with the kind of books he would've loved to read as a child, and just won the 2015 NSK Neustadt Prize for Children's Literature.

But first, Joshua Landis provides an update on Saudi Arabia’s break in relations with Iran after protests at the Saudi embassy in Tehran. On Sunday the kingdom executed a popular Shiite cleric.

The portrait of Nimr Baqr al-Nimr, the recently deceased Shia cleric in al-Awamiyah, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.
Abbas Goudarzi / Wikimedia Commons

Since the January 2 assassination of popular Shiite cleric Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, Iranians have continued to rally against Saudi Arabia, leading to a severing of diplomatic ties between the kingdom and the Islamic Republic.

Shevaun Williams / Shevaun Williams & Associates/World Literature Today

For 45 years, Meshack Asare has vividly written and illustrated stories for children that relate to their experiences growing up in Africa.

The Ghanaian author and artist grew up in the 1940s and 50s, the son of an accountant and a trader. His father loved to read – history books and magazines filled with vibrant color photographs. But Asare says there was nothing for a child to read other than textbooks designed to teach English reading and writing.

“It began with not reading children’s books, or the kinds that I would have loved as a child,” Asare said.

Messages of support for migrants and refugees chalked on a wall in Budapest, Hungary - Sept. 3, 2015.
Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung / Flickr

Last year saw the Middle East dominate international headlines, with instability that started in 2010 with the Arab Spring in Tunisia and Lebanon continuing and spreading across the region.

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