KGOU

Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss news about Spain's Basque separatist group and political protests in Armenia. 

Then Suzette Grillot talks with Amnesty International's Matt Wells about his work documenting violence against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. 

AP Photo/Thein Zaw

Myanmar’s leaders deny human rights abuses against its Rohingya Muslim population. But international organizations like Amnesty International have documented systematic, military-led violence against the country’s religious minority following insurgent attacks in August 2017.

“What we've seen over the last seven months is the Myanmar military has really launched an attack on the [Rohingya] population as a whole,” said Matt Wells, a human rights investigator with Amnesty International.

KARYN MILLER-MEDZON / HERE & NOW

  Linguists generally agree that almost half of the world’s nearly 7,000 languages will be extinct within the next century as dominant languages take over and indigenous languages die with their last remaining speakers.

The United States is no different. Linguist Marcia Haag says many Native American languages are on the verge of extinction.

AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico

Last week former Brazilian president Luiz Inacio “Lula” da Silva began serving a 12 year sentence for corruption and bribery. Prior to his surrender, thousands of Lula’s supporters gathered in São Paulo, insisting the charges are meant to prevent him from running, and likely winning, Brazil’s upcoming presidential election.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss how the Chinese National People's Congress eliminated term limits, and what that decision might mean for this week's decision by the Trump administration to levy tariffs on Chinese imports.  And they'll explore a new initiative in South Korea to reduce the number of hour that workers work each year.

Then, Rebecca Cruise will talk about U.S.-China relations with Chinese politics expert Joseph Fewsmith.

Iran's Ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Reza Najafi waits for the start of the IAEA board of governors meeting at the International Center in Vienna, Austria, Monday, March 5, 2018.
Ronald Zak / AP

Iranian-born Trita Parsi advised the Obama administration during the restoration of diplomacy between Iran and the United States. It began with a phone call between President Obama and Iranian president Hassan Rouhani in 2013 and culminated with what’s known as the Iran nuclear deal in 2015. Parsi’s latest book,  "Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran and the Triumph of Diplomacy," offers an inside look at the deal.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss  Sinn Fein's new leadership in Ireland and the push for women's rights among Kurds in Northern Syria. 

Then, Suzette talks with Trita Parsi about his new book, "Losing and Enemy: Obama, Iran and the Triumph of Diplomacy."

An Oscar statue at the 90th Academy Awards Governors Ball Press Preview on Thursday, March 1, 2018, in Los Angeles.
Richard Shotwell / Invision/AP

The glitz and glamor of Hollywood will gather on March 4 for the 90th Academy Awards. This year’s ceremony boasts several tight races, including for Best Foreign Language Film.

World Views: March 2, 2018

Mar 2, 2018

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise preview this year's Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film. The 2018 nominees are A Fantastic Woman (Chile), The Insult (Lebanon), Loveless (Russia), On Body and Soul (Hungary) and The Square (Sweden).

In this July 16, 2016, file photo, Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha waves as he arrives for a group photo of leaders at the 11th Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM) in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.
Mark Schiefelbein / AP Photo

Thailand’s prime minister, Prayuth Chan-ocha, has called for elections several times since he took power following a military coup in 2014. And he has found a way to delay them each time.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the Winter Olympics, Canada's Own the Podium program and sexual harassment allegations against U.S. snowboarder Shaun White. They also talk about the resignation of UNICEF deputy director Justin Forsyth over accusations of inappropriate behavior with female staff members when he was director of Save the Children.

Achy Obejas
Kaloian

Even though Achy Obejas’s family left Cuba when she was very young, the island nation has an enormous influence on her work.

Rebecca Cruise talks to Joshua Landis about the latest developments in Syria.

Then, Suzette Grillot interviews writer, translator and journalist Achy Obejas. They talk about Cuba, literature and why rupture is a major theme of Obejas's work.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about giant lily pads that have reappeared in Paraguay, and how drought is India is affecting world chickpea prices.

In this photo taken Tuesday Aug. 6, 2013, residents of Puros, northern Namibia, stand at the entrance of a shop in the deserted town.
Jerome Delay / AP

Sharing small amounts of money with poor people can help alleviate poverty and spur economic growth.

In his book Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution, anthropologist James Ferguson focuses on the question of who is owned what. He is particularly interested in the question of what claims poor people have, and the kinds of resources that can be shared with them.

Adnan Mahmutovich
http://www.adnanmahmutovic.com/

Adnan Mahmutovic fled the war-torn former Yugoslavia as a teenager, and settled as a refugee in Sweden. He began working as a care assistant for a man who had suffered a stroke, and the job became his introduction to Swedish life.

Poet Valzhyna Mort reading at the 2015 Neustadt Festival opening night, October 21, 2015.
Tyler Christian / World Literature Today (Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0)

Valzhyna Mort grew up in Belarus as the Soviet Union collapsed, and she’s spent her entire career using poetry to dispel misconceptions and bring her country out of Russia’s shadow.

“A great myth was that it was a really big reading nation, and I don’t know if it was really true, in terms of how much reading was done,” Mort told KGOU’s World Views. “But it’s certainly true that every household had a library. No matter what your parents did, how educated they were, you had a library.”

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the Trump administration's decision to forego its planned appointment of an ambassador to South Korea. They'll also discuss Israel's first use of an anti-boycott law after the singer Lorde canceled her concert there.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss protests in French over Dutch experiments with pulse fishing, and ongoing protests in India over a Bollywood film.

 Then, Rebecca talks with Andrea Glorioso, counsellor for digital economy for the European Union’s delegation to the United States, about the EU's digital single market plans.

Poet Mahtem Shiferraw’s collection of poetry Fuchsia examines personal displacement and nomadism from the perspective of immigrants.

Shiferraw, who grew up in Eritrea and Ethiopia before moving to Los Angeles, says she was inspired by poetry as a child. She attended an Italian school in Ethiopia, where she was immersed in a culture that embraced poetry.

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