KGOU

Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about British Prime Minister Theresa May's speech outlining Brexit. And as we continue our month-long series on international literature, Suzette talks to University of Toronto literature professor Dragana Obradovic about experiencing war as a child.

Dragana Obradovic, left, with her colleague Christina Kramer
University of Toronto

 

War broke out in the former Yugoslavia when Dragana Obradovic was only eight years old. Her family fled the region as refugees. By the time she was in her 20s, she felt a void about her childhood in the Balkans: She was old enough to remember the war, but too young to grasp its significance. Obradovic began asking questions about her own identity.

Dubravka Ugrešić
Jerry Braun

 

Dubravka Ugresic’s books focus on what she calls “the literariness of literature.” She’s fascinated by literature and likes to play with form and style, as she did in her 1993 novel Steffie Speck in the Jaws of Life, which references authors such as Gustave Flaubert and romance novels.

She is the recipient of many awards, including the University of Oklahoma’s Neustadt International Prize for Literature.

 

 

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about Malta assuming the presidency of the European Union. They also talk about the violent counterinsurgency and growing refugee problem in Myanmar.

And as we continue our month-long series about international literature, Suzettes interviews Croatian writer Dubravka Ugresic,. Ugresic fled her home after criticizing the nationalist movement that engulfed the former Yugoslavia.

Chad Post
Chad Post

 

A world of literary tradition remains outside the grasp of many American readers because few works are translated into English. Chad Post, the publisher of the University of Rochester’s Open Letter press, works to increase access to international literature by translating and publishing ten books each year.

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis talk about the Syrian cease-fire that was brokered by Russia and Turkey.

Then Suzette talks with Chad Post, the publisher and director of Open Letter Books, a non-profit literary, translation press housed at the University of Rochester in New York. He’s also the managing editor of Three Percent, a blog that promotes literature in translation.

An anti-Syrian government fighter, left, looks at a Syrian soldier, right, as he leaves the last besieged rebel-held neighborhood of Al-Waer in Homs province, Syria, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016.
SANA via AP

 

A cease-fire backed by Russia and Turkey is falling apart in Syria, and that leaves few good options for rebels in that country who are fighting against president Bashar al-Assad

Joshua Landis, the head of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, told KGOU’s World Views that Assad intends to take back all Syrian land currently held by rebels. Meanwhile, Turkey’s involvement in the cease-fire is an indication that country will no longer back the rebels.

A group of shamans, holding a President-elect Donald Trump poster, perform their annual pre-New Year ceremony, at Agua Dulce beach in Lima, Peru.
Karel Navarro / AP

2016 started with a strong possibility the United States would elect its first female president, but by the end of the year an outsider with no political experience, an unorthodox campaign style had tapped into discontent with establishment politics and ascended to one of the most powerful positions in the world.

If 2015 was the “year of the protest,” 2016 could arguably be dubbed the “year of the response,” especially at the ballot box in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere.

A wall of photographs of journalists killed while reporting the news lines a wall during the rededication of the Journalists Memorial at the Newseum in Washington, Monday, June 9, 2014.
Charles Dharapak / AP

International journalism has always been a dangerous line of work. Dozens of war correspondents have been killed in every major conflict since World War II.

Suzette Grillot talks about Brazil’s current political and economic challenges with University of Oklahoma anthropologist OU anthropologist Misha Klein.

Then Suzette talks with University of Pennsylvania visiting scholar Shervin Malekzadeh. He studies political participation and education in post-revolutionary Iran, especially when it comes to women.

Iranian schoolgirls wearing headscarves, background, gather in a courtyard at a female school as schoolboys play soccer in their school in this photo taken in Feb. 2002 in Tehran.
Hasan Sarbakhshian / AP

Before he started graduate school and became a university professor, Shervin Malekzadeh taught public school in low-income and minority communities in Washington, D.C. and California.

World Views: December 9, 2016

Dec 9, 2016

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis talk about the expected victory by Syrian forces in Aleppo, and what that could mean for the opposition and U.S. interests in the region.

Then Suzette talks with University of Nebraska-Omaha political scientist Jonathan Benjamin-Alvarado about the future of U.S.-Cuba relations under a Trump administration.

Russian and Syrian army soldiers gather at the last checkpoint before the front line with rebels, in Karam al-Tarab, east of Aleppo, Syria, Sunday, December 4.
Hassan Ammar / AP

Syrian forces have now seized control of more than half of the territory in Aleppo once held by rebels who opposite President Bashar al-Assad, and supporters of the Assad regime expect victory in the country’s largest city.

It’s a crushing blow to the opposition, and could trigger a domino effect as rebels retreat to more rural areas of Syria.

Two passengers deplane from JetBlue flight 387 waving a United States, and Cuban national flag, in Santa Clara, Cuba, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016.
Ramon Espinosa / AP

Since President Obama took office nearly eight years ago, relations between the United States and Cuba have slowly normalized. Following the election of Donald Trump, however, some Americans and Cubans now feel uncertain about their countries’ foreign policy futures.

In this Thursday Jan. 7, 2016 photo, an elderly woman drinks water from a bucket after waiting for hours for the municipality to deliver free water, in Senekal, South Africa.
Denis Farrell / AP

As resource distribution issues grow increasingly global, so do the organizations dedicated to solving them. From the Wounded Warrior Project to Water for People, Ned Breslin has used his experience to transform how nongovernmental organizations approach issues of water and sanitation in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

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