KGOU

Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the alleged "acoustic attack" against U.S. diplomats in Cuba, as well as tensions between Poland and the European Union.

Then, Rebecca talks with Brazilian sociologist Biance Freire-Medeiros about favela tourism.

An anti-government demonstrator cries during a vigil in honor of those who have been killed during clashes between security forces and demonstrators in Caracas, Venezuela, Monday, July 31, 2017.
Ariana Cubillos / AP

Tension continues to grow in Venezuela this week after the government held elections over the weekend to elect a constituent assembly that can rewrite the country’s constitution. President Nicolás Maduro plans to move forward with 545-member body that is loyal to him. Opposition parties boycotted the election, calling it unconstitutional.

Suzette Grillot talks with Charlie Kenney about this weekend's election in Venezuela.

Then, Suzette continues her conversation with Juan Cole about historical factors that shape the modern Middle East.

In this photo taken Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014, textile workers strike to demand a minimum wage, the removal of their company's head and the head of the firm's holding company, and back pay of yearly bonuses in Mahalla al-Kobra, Egypt.
Sabry Khaled / AP Photo / El Shorouk Newspaper

Though violence related to religion and sectarian identity exists in the Middle East, there are other areas of conflict in the region that are often misunderstood or underreported.

Juan Cole, a historian at the University of Michigan who writes on the blog Informed Comment, says labor issues in Egypt, for instance, have produced some of the biggest conflicts in that country over the past two decades.

School children attend the first day of classes at the Talaat Harb government primary school, in the popular district of Shubra, Cairo, Egypt, Monday Sept. 28, 2015.
Mohamed Elraai / AP

Rapid population growth is a major catalyst for many of the issues currently facing the Middle East.

Juan Cole, a commenter on the Middle East and a historian at the University Michigan, says the demographic bulge has implications on a number of things, such as unemployment and infrastructure. The large number of young people also puts a strain on education.

Suzette Grillot talks with Joshua Landis about the Trump administration's plan to end covert support for the anti-Assad rebels in Syria.

Then, Suzette begins a two-part series of discussions with historian Juan Cole about the causes of conflict in the Middle East.

In this May 16, 2013 file photo, Chinese demonstrators hold banners as they participate in a protest against a planned refinery project in downtown Kunming, in southwestern China's Yunnan province.
Aritz Parra / AP

China’s environmental movement is one of the few areas in which Chinese citizens can generally speak their mind, according to documentary filmmaker and journalist Gary Marcuse.

Marcuse, whose documentary Waking the Green Tiger explores the demonstrations that blocked a dam project in the Tiger Leaping Gorge, says there are between 50,000 and 100,000 environmental demonstrations every year in China. Many citizens protest the country’s high levels of smog and other environmental issues.

From Alaska, Rebecca Cruise discusses how Alaskans are reacting to the testing of North Korean missiles that could potentially reach that state. From Jerusalem, Suzette Grillot talks about Friday's attack that killed two Israeli police officers at the Western Wall.

Then Suzette talks with filmmaker Gary Marcuse about his film Waking the Green Tiger and the environmental movement in China.

World Views: July 7, 2017

Jul 7, 2017

Joshua Landis talks with historian Salim Yaqub about the factors that create instability in the Middle East, and why the Israeli-Palestinian peace process has stalled.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the French trial of Equatorial Guinea's vice president, and India Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to the White House.

Then, Suzette talks with SOIL director of strategy Nick Preneta about his organization's work in Haiti to turn human waste into fertilizer.

SOIL

Sanitation and waste treatment is underdeveloped in Haiti, a nation that has suffered massive earthquakes and hurricanes, a cholera epidemic and ineffective governance. Now, non-profit organizations like Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods, or SOIL, are collaborating with the Haitian government to help improve waste treatment and sanitation.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the Trump administration's changes to Cuba policy, and the ongoing conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Then, Suzette talks with Mateo Farzaneh about the role of Iranian women in the Iran-Iraq War. Farzaneh's forthcoming book is Iranian Women and Gender in the Iran-Iraq War.

Islamwomen.net

Mateo Farzaneh was recently visiting the Iranian city of Khorramshahr, a border city that put up a battle against Iraqi forces in 1980 during the Iran-Iraq War. The city fended off troops for 34 days before the Iraqis finally occupied it. Inside a mosque that is famous for its resistance to the foreign occupation, Farzaneh noticed an oversight.

“I walked in and I saw a ton of portraits of men as being the martyrs and people that sacrifice everything. But there was not a single photograph of women,” Farzaneh told KGOU’s World Views.

Rebecca Cruise talks with Paul Worley from Western Carolina University about the first indigenous woman to run for president of Mexico.

Then, Suzette Grillot interviews Ted Henken about entrepreneurs in Cuba.

A private entrepreneur who sells house and kitchen supplies waits for customers at his home in Havana, Cuba, Tuesday, May 24, 2016.
Desmond Boylan / AP

Ted Henken was visiting the Cuban beach resort of Varadero, looking for a place to stay. He asked a waiter if for accommodation suggestions. During the waiter’s smoke break, he took Henken to five bed and breakfasts within 15 minutes.

Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis talks about the diplomatic falling out between Qatar its neighbors, and the recent terrorist attack in Iran.

And Suzette Grillot speaks with Laura Murray-Kolb about the effects of iron deficiency on children and mothers.

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about Taiwan's same-sex marriage ruling. They also discuss Turkey's cancelation of Oklahoma City Thunder player Enes Kanter's passport, and what it means to be stateless.  Then, Suzette interviews Michael Georgieff, a professor pediatrics and child psychology at the University of Minnesota. Much of his work focuses on iron deficiency in the brains of young children. 

In this Feb. 10, 2017 photo, nurses take care of a newborn baby in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai government is distributing prenatal vitamins containing folic acid and iron to women between the ages of 20-34.
Sakchai Lalit / AP

Research into micronutrients is beginning to show how deficiencies can impact neuropsychological functioning through the life of a patient.

Historically, studies of a shortage of macronutrients, like protein, have shown an association with a lack of cognitive ability. However, until relatively recently, there was little research into how micronutrient deficiencies impact the brain, according to Laura Murray-Kolb, a nutritional scientist at Penn State University.

Children eat a meal at an orphanage.
Marina Kroupina / Center for Neurobehavioral Development, University of Minnesota

Making sure people across the globe have access to proper nutrition is a goal of international organizations like UNICEF and the World Health Organization.

But sometimes, simply acquiring the right nutrients isn’t enough, especially if outside factors get in the way of allowing the body to process nutrients correctly.

RC Davis is the executive director of World Literature Today at the University of Oklahoma and the author of "Mestizoes Come Home!: Making and Claiming Mexican American Identity."
University of Oklahoma

Starting in the 1960s, the Mexican-American community began a period of reawakening.

In his new book, Mestizos Come Home! Making and Claiming Mexican American Identity, RC Davis explores how this community took hold of its past and cultural identity.

“They said we are going to embrace our culture and we're going to learn our history, we're going to share history with others. We're going to invite people in to learn about our culture. So it was a very deliberate act of cultural recovery,” Davis told KGOU’s World Views.

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