KGOU

Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca talk about women in leadership role worldwide, and in Germany.

Then, Suzette discusses the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution with historian Joshua Sanborn.

A demonstration of workers from the Putilov plant in Petrograd (modern day St. Peterburg), Russia, during the February Revolution.
State museum of political history of Russia

This year is the 100th anniversary of the Russian revolution of 1917, one of the most important geopolitical events of the 20th century. The revolution was a product of several domestic factors and the First World War, which was especially destructive for Eastern Europe.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise will discuss the independence vote in Spain's Catalan region, and the Trump administration's expulsion of Cuban diplomats.

Then, Suzette talks with British Consul General Karen Bell about trade, security and Brexit.

Conservative Party Leader and Prime Minister, Theresa May, addresses delegates during a speech at the Conservative Party Conference at Manchester Central, in Manchester, England, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017.
Rui Vieira / AP

Trade between Oklahoma and the United Kingdom is thriving, and it’s Karen Bell’s job to promote and enhance trade and investment.

Karen Bell is the Consul General of the United Kingdom, stationed in Houston, Texas. Oklahoma falls within the five-state area in which she works.

“The UK is already the fifth largest market for exports of goods and services from Oklahoma. And the value actually to your local economy on trade with the UK, is getting on for half a billion dollars,” Bell told KGOU’s World Views.

Former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva greets supporters after giving his testimony to a federal judge overseeing a bribery investigation in Curitiba, in Curitiba, Brazil, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017.
Denis Ferreira / AP

Corruption scandals continue to plague Brazilian presidents, past and present. Former two-term president Luiz Inácio “Lula” da Silva, was found guilty of taking bribes involving a luxury beachfront apartment, in connection with assisting Brazilian Petroleum giant, Petrobras, in securing government contracts. He was sentenced to nine-and-a-half years in prison. President Lula denies all charges against him and appealed the decision.

World Views: September 29, 2017

Sep 29, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the elections in Germany and Angola, and separatist referenda in Iraqi Kurdistan and Spain's Catalan region.

Then, Suzette talks with Fabio De Sa E Silva, a Brazil expert at the University of Oklahoma's Department of International & Area Studies, about Brazilian corruption investigations.

Portrait of Father Stanley Rother
Archdiocese of Oklahoma City

Born in the small town of Okarche, Oklahoma, Father Stanley Rother was ordained into the Roman Catholic Church in Oklahoma City in 1963. He served as a missionary pastor in Guatemala from 1968 until 1981, when he was murdered.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss obesity and processed foods in the developing world.

Then, Suzette talks with University of Oklahoma political scientist Charlie Kenney about the political and social conditions that led to the death of Oklahoma priest Stanley Rother in Guatemala in 1981.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the ongoing humanitarian crisis regarding the Rohingya in Myanmar, and Turkey's missile deal with Russia.

Then, Suzette talks with Gershon Lewental about corruption investigations into the family and associates of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017.
Ronen Zvulun / Pool Photo via AP

Allegations of corruption are circling Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, his family and inner circle. While Netanyahu has not been indicted yet, many of his close friends, colleagues and family have been ensnared in the investigations.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss Canada's offer to accept DACA recipients, and the relationship between the United States and China.

Then, Suzette talks with Bansari Mehta about World Experiences Foundation. The organization holds its annual gala and awards ceremony on September 9.

Bansari Mehta
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

When Bansari Mehta first left India to pursue a master’s degree in Oklahoma, she was surprised by how often she was asked to point to her home country on the map.

“Those were the days that I realized that there is something that’s missing,” Bansari told KGOU’s World Views. “As lovely as the people of Oklahoma are, they did not have much of a broader understanding about things outside of the state or outside of the country.”

Ostriches are seen at a farm in the Cerrado ecosystem, outskirts of Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011.
Eraldo Peres / AP

The Central Brazilian state of Goiás is home to a diverse ecosystem known as the Cerrado, which can be understood as the Brazilian savanna. The area is massive, encompassing around 2 million square kilometers, and is home to 44 species that can be found nowhere else on earth.

Around the world, fire management is often used for the purpose of disturbing ecosystems, such the Cerrado, in such a way that it can increase the diversification of species. But in Brazil, the concept of fire management is not well developed in policy. 

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss historic flooding in south Asia and the corruption investigation into Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales.

Then, Suzette, talks with plant ecologist Lara Souza about climate change and fire on Brazil's savanna.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss this week's elections in Angola and upcoming elections in Cambodia.

Then, Suzette talks with Katerina Tsetsura about the ongoing conflict in Ukraine and civil society engagement.

Ukrainian government army soldiers examine weapons captured from rebels in the city of Slovyansk, Donetsk Region, eastern Ukraine Saturday, July 5, 2014.
Dmitry Lovetsky / AP

Conflict and suffering continue in Ukraine as pro-Russian forces in eastern regions of the country continue to fight with Ukrainian soldiers. The violence dates back to 2014, when Russia annexed Crimea and supported separatists in eastern Ukraine. Despite the ongoing hostilities, a small group of activists is working to build civil society in the country.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the alleged "acoustic attack" against U.S. diplomats in Cuba, as well as tensions between Poland and the European Union.

Then, Rebecca talks with Brazilian sociologist Biance Freire-Medeiros about favela tourism.

An anti-government demonstrator cries during a vigil in honor of those who have been killed during clashes between security forces and demonstrators in Caracas, Venezuela, Monday, July 31, 2017.
Ariana Cubillos / AP

Tension continues to grow in Venezuela this week after the government held elections over the weekend to elect a constituent assembly that can rewrite the country’s constitution. President Nicolás Maduro plans to move forward with 545-member body that is loyal to him. Opposition parties boycotted the election, calling it unconstitutional.

Suzette Grillot talks with Charlie Kenney about this weekend's election in Venezuela.

Then, Suzette continues her conversation with Juan Cole about historical factors that shape the modern Middle East.

In this photo taken Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014, textile workers strike to demand a minimum wage, the removal of their company's head and the head of the firm's holding company, and back pay of yearly bonuses in Mahalla al-Kobra, Egypt.
Sabry Khaled / AP Photo / El Shorouk Newspaper

Though violence related to religion and sectarian identity exists in the Middle East, there are other areas of conflict in the region that are often misunderstood or underreported.

Juan Cole, a historian at the University of Michigan who writes on the blog Informed Comment, says labor issues in Egypt, for instance, have produced some of the biggest conflicts in that country over the past two decades.

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