Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Al Jazeera English Channel staff prepare for a broadcast in the Doha newsroom in Qatar on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2006., the day before the network's launch.
Hamid Jalaudin / AP

A decade ago, retired U.S. Marine and current Al Jazeera English journalist Josh Rushing’s life looked significantly different. Rushing frequently served as an interview subject representing the Corps during Operation Iraqi Freedom, a position he describes as “selling the war.”

“I would now call it ‘casting’ without much sense of irony,” Rushing said of his selection as a spokesperson. “I was cast for the position. I was a young Marine. I had a certain look. I had a young family. I fit exactly the bill they were looking for.”

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grllot discuss the situation in Yemen after rebel groups fired missiles at a U.S. naval vessel.

Then Rebecca Cruise talks with Lucio Bianchi. He's an activist and supporter of Italy's Movimento 5 Stelle ("Five Star Movement"), and will explain the country's growing populism.

Brian Hardzinski

Just 10 years ago, only 30 percent of American adults reported owning a laptop computer -- a number that has now doubled, according to the Pew Research Center’s latest data.

World Views: October 7, 2016

Oct 7, 2016

During the first presidential debate last month, both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton said cybersecurity would be a significant challenge for the next U.S. president. Suzette Grillot discusses the international aspects of hacks, internet attacks, and political espionage with the University of Oklahoma’s Mark Raymond.


But first, Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the peace deal voters in Colombia defeated, and a proposed new law in the UK requiring businesses to declare how many foreign-born employees they’ve hired.

World Views: September 30, 2016

Sep 30, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the legacy of Israel’s prime minister and president Shimon Peres, who died this week, and President Obama’s nomination of the first U.S. Ambassador to Cuba in decades.


Then Suzette talks with the University of Oklahoma’s Diplomat In Residence Rob Andrew. He's spent 13 years in the Foreign Service, including assignments in Mexico, Costa Rica, Sweden, and Russia.

University of Oklahoma Diplomat In Residence Rob Andrew

Despite its location in a landlocked, central state, the University of Oklahoma’s serves as the home base for Rob Andrew, the U.S. State Department’s Diplomat in Residence for the Central U.S. region.

He grew up in an internationally engaged family - Andrew’s mother is Canadian. His earlier career as a U.S. Army officer who served in the Middle East during the first Gulf War eventually led him to the Foreign Service.

World Views: September 23, 2016

Sep 26, 2016

Joshua Landis provides an update on the latest news from Syria, and Suzette Grillot talks with Kay Bickham from the Oklahoma City chapter of the International Visitors Council.

Oklahoma City Skyline at night
StevenSmith1 / Flickr Creative Commons

While pop-culture references to Oklahoma frequently involve depictions of either tranquil farm folk or tornadic American sharpshooters, few Americans realize the distinctly international role of that the state has. Along with over 200,000 immigrants who call Oklahoma home, both Tulsa and Oklahoma host international delegations through an organization known as Global Ties.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss Italy's response to drug trafficking through North Africa, and how it's affecting groups like the Islamic State, who are fighting over the region.


Then Grillot talks with journalist and author Maria Armoudian. Her latest book tells the book tells the stories of reporters who cover war zones, the challenges of shrinking budgets, and censorship.

Swaths of cannabis in northern Morocco. The U.N. estimates 80,000 families in the rugged northern Rif mountains make their living from growing marijuana. Their efforst have made Morocco the main hashish supplier for Europe and the world.
Abdeljalil Bounhar / AP

Since 2013, European Union officials have seized hundreds of tons of hashish, worth more than $3 billion, from 20 ships traversing a lucrative drug trafficking route across the Mediterranean.

The drugs flow through multiple countries – Morocco, Libya, Egypt, and some Balkan states – and even areas controlled by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants, who are taxing the shipments as it goes through their territory.

Maria Armoudian
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Maria Armoudian’s first book explored the role radio played in exploiting deeply-held divisions between Hutus and Tutsis during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide.

U.S. men's gymnastics coach Mark Williams says he could sit down for a meal in the Olympic Village and overhear conversations in five different language. He'll share his experiences from Rio de Janeiro and his thoughts on sports diplomacy in a conversation with Suzette Grillot.

But first, Rebecca Cruise talks with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Noah Theriault about the Philippines' new president and his controversial tactics to confront drug trafficking and violence in his country.

Germany's Fabian Hambuechen, Britain's Nile Wilson, and United States' Danell Leyva celebrate during the medal ceremony for horizontal bar during 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Aug. 16, 2016.
Rebecca Blackwell / AP

An Olympic hallmark since the 1932 games, the Olympic Village in Rio de Janeiro hosted University of Oklahoma men’s gymnastics coach Mark Williams and his team this summer. Of all the spectacles he saw in Brazil, Williams found the facility one of the most striking.

“The Olympic village is just an amazing place. You can sit down and have lunch and have five different languages in your ear,” Williams said. “One day I just started to count, and I think I got up to 35 different countries represented within about 100 feet of me.”

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump walks with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto at the end of their joint statement at Los Pinos, the presidential official residence, in Mexico City, Wednesday.
Dario Lopez-Mills / AP

As the United States gears up for the 2016 presidential election, voters must tackle the ever-present concerns of foreign policy and international engagement. In an era of globalization, increasingly open channels of information, disputes over land and growing trans-national trade, Americans are trying to figure out America’s role in the world.

Suzette Grillot checks in with Erika Larkins. She just returned from a year-long assignment in Brazil, and she'll offer her takeaways from the 2016 Summer Olympic games, which wrapped up Sunday.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis join the program to discuss Turkey's recent military moves in Syria, and North Korea's testing of a submarine-launched missile.