KGOU

Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot checks in with Erika Larkins. She just returned from a year-long assignment in Brazil, and she'll offer her takeaways from the 2016 Summer Olympic games, which wrapped up Sunday.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis join the program to discuss Turkey's recent military moves in Syria, and North Korea's testing of a submarine-launched missile.

A security official stands guard ahead of a men's preliminary volleyball match between Cuba and Iran at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016.
Matt Rourke / AP

In the years since its selection as the site of the 2016 Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro has drawn strong opinions both domestically and abroad about the sustainability and feasibility of the global sporting event.

World Views: August 19, 2016

Aug 19, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about the ethical issues of China’s use of prisoners for organ transplants. The country says the practice has ended, but doctors and non-governmental organizations question whether or not that’s true. They also discuss political strife in South Africa.

Later, we'll revisit Suzette's 2013 conversation with Oklahoma City television journalist Erielle Reshef. Earlier in her career she spent several years working for the Israeli Broadcasting Authority. Two weeks ago she announced she’s leaving her television job at KOCO Channel 5.

Erielle Reshef reports from an Iron Dome missile defense site in Ashkelon during a 2012 rocket barrage.
Erielle Reshef / Facebook

Editor's Note: This conversation originally aired Sept. 13, 2013.

Between 2010 and 2012, Oklahoma City native Erielle Reshef reported twice from Gaza during instances of cross-border violence between Israelis and Palestinians.

Russia's Yulia Efimova, left, looks on as United States' Lilly King celebrates after winning the gold medal in the women's 200-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.
Michael Sohn / AP

Beyond the athletic competition, feats of strength, and patriotic triumph, the Olympics serve as a moment where countries can come together and put their differences aside. But politics has played out during the first week of competition.

In the early 1900s, opponents of the Shah wrote a constitution and established a parliament in Iran. 
Suzette Grillot talks with Boston University historian Houchang Chehabi about Iran’s brief 20th century experiment with democracy.

But first, Rebecca Cruise joins the show to talk about some of the positive and negative moments of sportsmanship in the Olympics.

A female supporter of the Iranian opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi flashes a victory sign during a July 17, 2009 rally.
Unknown / Obtained By AP

Iran flirted with democracy during the early part of the 20th century, but it didn’t quite stick.

At the top of Rocinha favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Editor's Note: This interview originally aired June 3, 2014..

A week before the 2014 FIFA World Cup begins in Brazil, soccer’s international governing body has expressed concern that three of the stadiums won’t be ready, and legendary Brazilian striker Ronaldo says he’s “appalled” by his country’s preparations for the sport’s biggest event.

Military medical personnel attend a drill that simulates a biological or nuclear attack at Galeo Air Base in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, July 15, 2016.
Renata Brito / AP

The 2016 Summer Olympics open Friday night in Rio de Janeiro. Like soccer’s World Cup two years ago, the event has drawn the world’s attention to Brazil’s largest city and raised questions about health, security, and the country’s economic and political climate.

As the 2016 Summer Olympics get underway in Rio de Janeiro, we revisit Suzette Grillot's 2014 conversation with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Erika Robb Larkins about the city's poorest neighborhoods.

Larkins then joins the show from Brazil to provide an update on the city's mood and preparation ahead of Friday's opening ceremonies.

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