Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

"...a thoroughly modern sculpture by the Scandinavian artist Clara Sörnäs.   It shows five slave figures, slightly larger than life, chained together in a pit.
missy & the universe / Flickr

Iran only abolished slavery in 1928, but since then, it’s been largely erased from the national consciousness. Historian Beeta Baghoolizadeh, who studies Iranian slavery, says the taboo surrounding slavery and Iran’s effort to distance itself from its past is due to its precarious position on the world stage 87 years later.

A 2014 photo of MetroJet EI-ETJ, the Airbus A321-231 that crashed in Egypt Saturday.
Sergey Korovkin / Wikimedia Commons

There’s still no definitive indication as to what caused Saturday’s crash of a Russian passenger jet, despite reports that a bomb caused the plane to disintegrate mid-flight, Russian and Egyptian officials reject the assumption, although the U.S. has said satellite imagery showed a big flash near the plane before it crashed in the Sinai region of Egypt. Islamic State rebels have claimed responsibility for the crash.

Aftermath of an attack by a group of AKP supporters on the Hürriyet newspaper headquarters in September 2015.
Hilmi Hacaloğlu / Voice of America

On Sunday, Turkey’s ruling AKP party surpassed expectations and regained its majority in the country’s parliament. But the elections have been marred by violence and suppression of the media, and Turkey has been dealing with external problems along its Syrian border as refugees continue to flood into the country to escape the civil war.

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss the International Olympic Committee easing restrictions on refugee athletes, and a recent International Monetary Fund report describing the effect low oil prices could have on Middle East cash reserves:

Then Suzette talks with Leslie Woodward, one of the founders of the Post-Conflict Research Center in Sarajevo. Her organization works to ease the two-decade-old wounds of the wars in the Balkans.

The Al-Faisaliah Tower in downtown Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
Mohammed Al-Deghaishim / United Nations Information Centres

Falling oil prices and continued instability in the Middle East will continue to deplete liquid financial assets in the region’s oil exporters, according to the International Monetary Fund.

The IMF released its Middle East economic outlook report earlier this month, which indicates that Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest exporter of oil, could run out of cash reserves in five years unless crude prices rebound.

Leslie Woodward (right) and Velma Šarić (middle) interview a man as part of their work with the Post-Conflict Research Center.
Velija Hasanbegović / Post-Conflict Research Center

Throughout the 1990s, Bosnia and Herzegovina was no stranger to genocide and war. Divided by three major ethic groups, tension is still palpable two decades later.

Oklahoma City native Leslie Woodward, the founder and project director of the Post-Conflict Research Center, uses positive storytelling through multimedia as a peace-building strategy for the region.

Rebecca Cruise talks with energy analyst Andreas Goldthau, who says if Europe embraces technology like hydraulic fracturing, it’ll reduce the reliance on Russian oil and natural gas.

But first, Joshua Landis analyzes Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s surprise visit to Moscow this week to brief Russian President Vladimir Putin on both current and future military operations in Syria. 

Syrian protesters hold signs with the faces of president Bashar al-Assad and Russian President Vladimir Putin in Damascus - March 4, 2012
Freedom House / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Syrian president Bashar al-Assad made a surprise visit to Moscow this week to meet with Russian president Vladimir Putin. It marks the first time he’s left the county since the civil war began in 2011.

Suzette Grillot is still in Turkey, and talks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir again this week about Saturday's bombing in Ankara, and the response from the government and everyday Turks.

Then Suzette explores some of the parallels between Brazil’s military dictatorships, and the country’s LGBTQ subculture in the 20th century with Brown University historian James Green. They'll also discuss evolving U.S. opposition to Brazil’s military junta in the 1960s and 70s.

Brazil's Tancredo Neves campaigning before his 1985 election. He was the first democratically elected president in a quarter-century, but died before taking office.
Cidadão de Minas / Flickr

After the Cuban Revolution in 1959, U.S. policy makers worried other left-leaning governments in Latin American could turn into a revolutionary movement. In early 1964, the U.S. did little to stand in the way of a military coup in Brazil that overthrew the democratically elected President Joao Goulart – leading to a 21-year authoritarian dictatorship.

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