Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

top secret confidential document
RestrictedData / Flickr

Most of the information in the intelligence world is unclassified.

That may seem counterintuitive, but longtime intelligence analyst Thomas Fingar says the whole point of intelligence is to aid decision-makers.

“It's not giving them what they want, it's giving them what the analysts that they are working with feels they need - if they think that their understanding is incomplete or inaccurate to help them to understand how to put it in perspective and the like. So it's influenced by the policy agenda,” Fingar said.

President Barack Obama presents President Xi Jinping of the People's Republic of China with a gift of an inscribed redwood park bench at the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, Calif., June 8, 2013.
Pete Souza / The White House

President Obama and Chinese president Xi Jinping are meeting this week to discuss an arms deal for cyberspace. It’s the first of its kind – an agreement not to use cyber weapons to attack each other’s infrastructure. The move would protect things like medical facilities, cell phone towers, banking systems, and power grids.

President Barack Obama meets with Prime Minister Vladimir Putin at his dacha outside Moscow, Russia, July 7, 2009.
Pete Souza / The White House

Next week President Obama plans to meet with Russian president Vladimir Putin at the United Nations to discuss efforts and support in Syria. Russia has been backing the Syrian administration of Bashar al-Assad since the civil war began more than four years ago – sending planes, tanks and troops to bolster Bashar al-Assad’s government and tenuous hold on power in the troubled country. But the rise of Islamic State militants has created even more questions about who to stand behind in the Middle East.

Suzette Grillot talks with Maxine Margolis, an anthropologist at the University of Florida and Columbia University’s institute of Latin American Studies. She’s spent her career studying the thousands of college-educated Brazilians come to the United States every year.

But first, last week’s discussion of the ongoing migrant crisis continues with Mitchell Smith, who chairs the University of Oklahoma's European Union Center. He discusses the EU policy responses to the refugees and other migrants arriving in Europe.

Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Since the 1990s, Brazil has slowly positioned itself as a major economic world player. It’s been one of the fastest-growing economies in the world over the past two decades, with abundant natural resources and ongoing appreciation of its currency. Goldman Sachs economist Jim O’Neill coined the term BRIC in a 2001 paper to describe how Brazil, Russia, India, and China could become economic juggernauts by the year 2050.

Messages of support for migrants and refugees chalked on a wall in Budapest, Hungary - Sept. 3, 2015.
Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung / Flickr

On Monday the 22 member states of the European Union plan to hold a special meeting in Brussels to discuss what to do about the hundreds of thousands of migrants fleeing areas of Iraq and Syria torn apart by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants.

European Union Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker wants the nearly two dozen countries to endorse a plan forcing member states to grant asylum to nearly 160,000 refugees fleeing the Middle East.

The train station in Budapest, Hungary on September 4, 2015.
Rebecca Harms / Flickr

The latest figures from the International Organization for Migrants says more than 364,000 migrants have arrived in Europe so far this year, with 2,800 dying along the way.

Earlier this week Hungarian authorities shut down Budapest's train station as it overflowed with migrants trying to get to other parts of Europe.

World Views panelist and central and southeastern Europe expert Rebecca Cruise Hungary has taken criticism for how it's handling the migrant crisis.

ISIS propaganda shows explosives damaging the historic ancient Temple of Baalshamin in the ancient site of Palmyra.
Wnt / Wikimedia Commons

The Syrian government announced this week Islamic State militants destroyed 2,000-year-old tower tombs in the central city of Palmyra, claiming the Roman-era sites promote idolatry.

Joshua Landis talks about Islamic State militants destroying significant artifacts in the Middle East, and Rebecca Cruise explains the ongoing migrant crisis throughout Europe.

Then Suzette Grillot is joined by Braulio Fernández, a professor and literary critic at the University of the Andes in Colombia. While everyone he went to school with studied Spanish literature, Braulio Fernandez gravitated toward something else.

William Shakespeare's First Folio, behind glass at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.
Jessie Chapman / Wikimedia Commons

Braulio Fernández’s literary journey began as a young child.

“I recall one afternoon when my dad came home and he gave me an issue of Robinson Crusoe, an illustrated issue hardback, and it was absolutely magic,” said Braulio Fernández, the director of the literature program at the University of the Andes in Santiago, Chile.