KGOU

Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the violent demonstrations in Venezuela against the Nicolas Maduro regime, and Australia's new, more stringent tests to earn citizenship.

Then, Suzette will talk with Afghanistan's ambassador to the United States, Hamdullah Mohib, about foreign investment in his country and the role of women in modern Afghan society.

Ambassador Hamdullah Mohib
The Embassy of Afghanistan

 

Like many young Afghans, Ambassador Hamdullah Mohib has lived in a country that has been at war most of his life. Born in 1983, Ambassador Mohib stressed that he and Afghanistan's young population as a whole have benefited from the relative stability brought to the country by the arrival of U.S. troops in 2001. But this stability only came after Afghanistan lurched from monarchy to communism to anarchy and then to extremism and finally to democracy over the decades.

 

http://saragoldrickrab.com/

More people want to pursue higher education now in the United States, and more students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds want to go to college or university. Even though a desire to achieve higher education is greater, it has also created enormous problems, according to Temple University education and sociology professor Sara Goldrick-Rab.

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis about recent developments in Syria and how the Trump administration's policy toward Syria and Russia is changing.

Then, Suzette talks to Temple University education and sociology professor Sara Goldrick-Rab about challenges facing higher education.

This satellite image released by the U.S. Department of Defense shows a damage assessment image of Shayrat air base in Syria, following U.S. Tomahawk Land Attack Missile strikes on Friday, April 7, 2017.
DigitalGlobe/U.S. Department of Defense via AP

 

American forces launched over 50 missiles at a Syrian air base Thursday night, to retaliate against the Bashar Assad regime’s use of chemical weapons.

Joshua Landis, the director of the University of Oklahoma’s Center for Middle East Studies, told KGOU’s World Views he doesn’t expect President Donald Trump to get involved in regime change.

“Regime change would not be good for America,” Landis said.

Mosaic Theater founding artistic director Ari Roth.
Mosaic Theater

 

Ari Roth says conflict is “the coin of the realm” in theater. So theater is naturally effective at giving voice to conflict regions.

“When you're in a conflict region and you care about the people involved. You want to see healing. You want to see repair. You want to see bridges being built,” Roth told KGOU World Views.

Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis talk about the offensive in Syria, and protests in Russia.

Then, Suzette Grillot talk to University of Oklahoma College of Earth and Energy dean Mike Stice about global oil production.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about the attack in London, the ban of electronic devices on flights from several countries in the Middle East and North Africa, and the impeachment of South Korea's president.

Then, Joshua Landis interviews Azerbaijan's ambassador to the United States, Elin Suleymanov.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the outcomes of the Dutch elections, and a food poisoning case that has sickened thousands of children in Egypt.

Then, Rebecca interviews historian Rochelle Ruthchild about the women’s movement in Russia and the Soviet Union. Ruthchild wrote the book Equality and Revolution: Women’s Rights in the Russian Empire, 1905-1917. She’s also a member of The 888 Women’s History Project, which recently produced the documentary film Left On Pearl about the 1971 International Women’s Day March in Boston.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about International Women's Day and protests that occurred around the world, Nike's new advertisement featuring athletic wear for Muslim women, and the second version of President Trump's travel ban.

Then, Suzette talks with filmmaker Luis Argueta about his documentary films about the immigration raid in Postville, Iowa. 

Suzette Grillot talks to Joshua Landis about the latest in Syria.

Then, Suzette interviews Andrew Horton about his new documentary Laughter Without Borders. The film tells the story of clowns who visit children in stressed environments, like refugee camps.

Jan Damm, left; Sabine Choucair, center; and Kolleen Kintz, back perform in Greece for Clowns Without Borders.
Clowns Without Borders

 

 

Andrew Horton believes the best way to understand a country’s people is to learn what makes them laugh.

“Laughter crosses borders,” he says.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talks about nominees in the Best Foreign Language films category at the 2017 Oscars.

Then, Joshua Landis discusses Iran with Narges Bajoghli, an anthropologist and filmmaker. She’s a researcher in International Public Affairs at the Watson Institute at Brown University.

Nadim Shehadi

 

During the 20th century, countries in the Middle East developed strong, nationalist states that created a homogenous model for their societies. Lebanon, however, did not follow suit. As Middle East expert Nadim Shehadi likes to say, Lebanon skipped the 20th century altogether.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about ongoing protests in Romania.

Then, Suzette interviews Orville Schell about China's relationship with the world. Schell is an award-winning journalist and former dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at University of California-Berkeley.

An informal settlement in Zambia, taken during John Harris' 2014 trip.
David Boeck

 

Urbanization is rapidly expanding on a global scale, and it is creating a demand for reorganization of cities and spaces. Urban and regional planners, like John Harris, weigh the different needs of societies to ensure the city suits the people who live in it. Harris focuses on sustainable urbanization, especially in Africa where he has dealt with informal settlements.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about President Trump's executive order that pauses the resettlement of refugees in the United States and bans travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.

Then, Suzette talks with John Harris about sustainable development and informal communities in Africa.

Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, center, with court security guards at left and right, appears before the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Tuesday July 3, 2001.
AP

 

Ellen Elias-Bursac, current standing Vice President for the American Literary Translation Association and former revision expert for the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal, has helped ease the challenges created by language barriers. During her time at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Elias-Bursac was given the responsibility of translating and verifying evidence during the war crime trials.

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about British Prime Minister Theresa May's speech outlining Brexit. And as we continue our month-long series on international literature, Suzette talks to University of Toronto literature professor Dragana Obradovic about experiencing war as a child.

Dragana Obradovic, left, with her colleague Christina Kramer
University of Toronto

 

War broke out in the former Yugoslavia when Dragana Obradovic was only eight years old. Her family fled the region as refugees. By the time she was in her 20s, she felt a void about her childhood in the Balkans: She was old enough to remember the war, but too young to grasp its significance. Obradovic began asking questions about her own identity.

Pages