Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

A protester in Reykjavik on April 4, 2016 holds up a sign displaying her anger with Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson announced he would take a leave of absence after being linked to the Panama Papers.
Art Bicnick / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The release of the so-called “Panama Papers” – more than 11 million documents and personal files detailing financial information and offshore accounts of prominent individuals – dominated the international news cycle this week. It’s raised questions about the role of technology and the expectation of privacy.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss two sides of international education. China has charged an education advocate in Tibet with inciting separatism, and a one-room basement library in Afghanistan is providing books to citizens once ruled by the Taliban.

Then contributor Joshua Landis talks with Jeffrey Mankoff from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He argues the U.S. tried to outsource solving the Ukraine crisis onto German Chancellor Angela Merkel. They’ll also discuss Russia’s involvement in Syria.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss some of the international reaction to this year’s presidential candidate, and how other countries view some of the candidates.

Then Suzette talks with University of Central Oklahoma political scientist Husam Mohamad. He argues U.S. support toward a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is more of a shift in rhetoric rather than actual power.

Men at the Awarta checkpoint in the West Bank show their stomachs to prove they're not carrying explosives, October 1, 2006.
Michael Loadenthal / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

There’s been little progress on achieving peace between Israelis and Palestinians since the 1993 talks in Oslo ended in a memorable handshake between the late Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and President Yasser Arafat.

University of Central Oklahoma political scientist Husam Mohamad argues U.S. support of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is more of a shift in rhetoric rather than actual power.

"Deport Obama and Allah too" sign
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

There are just five major party contenders left in the 2016 U.S. presidential election – three Republicans and two Democrats – but the world’s attention is focused on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

U2 performing on one of their concerts of the 360° tour in Gelsenkirchen, Germany on August 3, 2009.
SteBo / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Rock music and charity have gone hand-in-hand for decades.

Former Beatle George Harrison organized the Concert for Bangladesh in 1971 to raise money and awareness of genocide after the country’s war for independence. Queen Elizabeth knighted The Boomtown Rats’ front man Bob Geldof for organizing the 1985 Live Aid concerts that spanned two continents, and Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, and Neil Young followed suit for American family farmers. After 9/11, dozens of groups gathered in Madison Square Garden for 2001’s Concert for New York City.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about her trip to Brazil and the reaction and response to the Zika virus, and some of the health and security issues related to a lawsuit against the United Nations over a cholera outbreak in Haiti.

Then Suzette and Joshua Landis talk with Middle East analyst Joseph Bahout about Lebanon’s relationship with Syria as the fifth anniversary of the civil war approaches.

A portrait of President Bashar al-Assad among the trash in the Syrian city of al-Qsair in 2012.
Freedom House / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Syria’s civil war approaches its fifth anniversary a little over a week from now, and there’s no end in sight as the conflict becomes even more nuanced and multi-faceted.

It started with protests against the regime of Bashar al-Assad on March 15, 2011, but quickly became a weaponized conflict and spread beyond the country’s borders as militants poured in, and global players used the unrest as a proxy to advance their own regional interests.

Suzette Grillot has been traveling through South America for the past two weeks, and she'll talk about Argentina’s history and current political situation with Grady Wray, a Spanish professor who leads OU’s study abroad program in Buenos Aires. 

Then Rebecca Cruise joins her for the show's annual preview of the Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film. The 2016 Academy Awards are this Sunday.

Academy Awards
mafleen / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

In one of the more controversial award shows in recent memory, Hollywood’s elite will gather in the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles on Sunday for the 88th Academy Awards.

Pages